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ASUS based Motherboards - Windows update can kill your computer

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posted on May, 8 2016 @ 06:51 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP

originally posted by: charlyv
a reply to: BlackboxInquiry

I will be a 7 holdout just like I was an XP holdout. I hate the the Windows 10 environment basically because they have no option to really go back to a standard well known format, so useful to programmers especially. I don't know many software people that like the crazy big icon nonsense and relocation of commonly used menus and commands.

I'm a programmer and got used to it quickly.

But maybe that's because I work everyday with Windows 10, 7, XP and 2008, and sometimes also Vista, 8 and 8.1, all in the same day.


I work with them all as well. The trouble is, you sit down with one workstation to work on , that has not been modified by the company IT's, and you have to go through 10 minutes of getting a usable working setup , otherwise you waste a half hour or more, clicking through needless buried crap. The point remains... a simple menu driven environment when debugging and using a compiler for people who know where all the underlying stuff is.

BTW: staying on topic, my home system is based on an Asus crosshair V formula Z mobo and a Corsair AX1200i PS. Rock solid and extremely crash resistant (as far as hardware problems go).
edit on 8-5-2016 by charlyv because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 8 2016 @ 07:08 PM
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originally posted by: charlyv
The trouble is, you sit down with one workstation to work on , that has not been modified by the company IT's, and you have to go through 10 minutes of getting a usable working setup , otherwise you waste a half hour or more, clicking through needless buried crap.

I am also the company's IT department.



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:23 PM
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originally posted by: DontTreadOnMe
a reply to: Vroomfondel

I really have no clue as to how to go into the BIOS

I think I've done it before....to change boot order.
And, I hear what you are saying...Windows Updates has been known to be very sneaky.

I have a memory stick (Windows 7 OS) I can reinstall. Would I do it now that 10 installed itself as an overlay? I think I am taking my laptop and joining the circus, to work with 3 toed Sloths, a third ring very slow 24 hour acrobatic high wire act (nothing happens but the anticipation of a slip/fall is everything).
edit on 8-5-2016 by vethumanbeing because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2016 @ 06:07 AM
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a reply to: vethumanbeing

So for a new system its best to do a clean Vanilla install of windows 7 then create a backup image on flash or CD?
And of coarse before you create that image you have to install all the recommended updates minus the ones that autoupdate windows 10 and Bing.

The Windows 7 disk I bought came with a COA code but do they have a simple repair function to restore just the key system files without overlaying your existing programs and settings?.



posted on May, 9 2016 @ 11:26 AM
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To think 2016 will finally be "the year of the Linux desktop" (for real this time), but the irony being that Microsoft themselves played the biggest role in that happening. Completely breaking things with updates is the same thing they did to XP users, although they dismissed it as the OS being depreciated and no longer supported - yet stuff done in the update changes was their fault. (For those using XP due to legacy hardware, the last 5 or so official updates from around April and March were best avoided.)

If you're willing to give Linux a try I'd suggest a distro using Cinnamon for the desktop environment, as it's themes and UI layout will feel the most familiar to former Windows users. (Most others are more like the Mac desktop by default.) Things tend to be where you expect them to be and function in a similar way. If you already use free software (Firefox, Thunderbird, Open/Libre Office, GIMP), then a lot more will feel familiar too - such that the change wont be too abrupt. Only other thing I'd suggest is finding the graphical config editor suited to your distro, it'll save some hunting for the exact terminal commands for those settings not available from the desktop control panels. (Each distro apparently insists on having different directory structures for the same thing. So browsing through a GUI on something like dconf helps. The closest thing on Windows seems to be regedit, and how navigating that works.) Other than that, you may want to read up on wireless and graphics, some still have rough edges in regards to compatibility - newer hardware seems to get along much better though.



posted on May, 9 2016 @ 03:03 PM
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Goto Linux using a TRUSTED COMPUTING VERSION with built-in security.

I prefer HARDENED-GENTOO LINUX which allows me to customize it
and replace ALL my FileOpen() calls and all Malloc() (memory allocation)
and Pointer-reference calls with with a fully encrypted single-source
point (hard-coded encrypted memory addresses) embedded onto a
ROM BIOS (NOT Flash Upgradeable!) which then does ALL direct disk
access and RAM memory access.

This PREVENTS memory scanners, JMP/RTRN assembler code bypasses,
and if you REMOVE AES-256 memory/disk encryption, you can use
a quantum-computing/SHOR's resistant encryption system that
is truly secure.

For truly uncompromised computing though, you need to get away from
Intel/AMD/ARM processors and basically burn your own CPU chips
on an FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) that DOES NOT have
a built-in hard ARM-cpu core. i.e. get a French-or-German-or-Japanese
made FPGA and NOT Altera or Xilinx. In our company, we go as far as to
shave the the circuit layers of certain ordered cpu/FPGA chip samples to
examine all layers and run a circuit pathways analysis to find hard-coded
security compromises or we burn Open-SPARC chips onto CMOS substrates
(we have a 7 nanometre resolution stepper and EBM pathway burner).

Most of you on here can't do that sort of security analysis and chip burning
because of the sheer cost and time of technical equipment and personnel
but for a company like ours thats deals with high secured systems
it's worth the money and time.

---

But for GENERAL OS security you can use a highly secured version
of Linux and replace all FileOpen and Malloc() calls to do what we
call Ring-0 inspection and protection of data and code to PREVENT
saves and loads of disk-based data and executable code from ANY
OTHER folder, file or memory location that is NOT on a hard-coded
protection list.

YES I know this sounds like a crazy-hard thing to do and it is,
but if YOU take your computer security seriously like we do
here then I would take a hard look at making sure you check
out Hardened-Gentoo and a hardened-compiler/assembler
to ensure that final compiles are not highjacked by
object file/C-library virus injection!

----

If you are TRULY PARANOID like we are, you can also flash
or burn the controller software on the Spinning-type
hard disks or the micro-OS controllers on Flash/SSD drives
and then use an OPEN BIOS for the graphics cards and
network cards. You can even do your own UEFI BIOS
onto a NON-FLASH UPGRADABLE EEPROM BIOS CHIP which
you can re-solder to the ASUS/TYAN/GIGABYTE motherboards.
De-soldering a MOBO chip really isn't all that hard, just make
sure you heat sink the solder-points properly before you do
a manual de-solder and re-solder of a MOBO BIOS chip.

---

So again, get rid of Windows 10 and goto a Secure Linux Distro!

edit on 2016/5/9 by StargateSG7 because: sp



posted on May, 9 2016 @ 03:19 PM
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originally posted by: StargateSG7
But for GENERAL OS security you can use a highly secured version
of Linux and replace all FileOpen and Malloc() calls to do what we
call Ring-0 inspection and protection of data and code to PREVENT
saves and loads of disk-based data and executable code from ANY
OTHER folder, file or memory location that is NOT on a hard-coded
protection list.

I have a simpler suggestion: for general OS security, learn about it and how to use it.



So again, get rid of Windows 10 and goto a Secure Linux Distro!

No thanks, I'm good.



posted on May, 9 2016 @ 03:44 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP

originally posted by: StargateSG7
But for GENERAL OS security you can use a highly secured version
of Linux and replace all FileOpen and Malloc() calls to do what we
call Ring-0 inspection and protection of data and code to PREVENT
saves and loads of disk-based data and executable code from ANY
OTHER folder, file or memory location that is NOT on a hard-coded
protection list.

I have a simpler suggestion: for general OS security, learn about it and how to use it.



So again, get rid of Windows 10 and goto a Secure Linux Distro!

No thanks, I'm good.


---

The problem is that m,odernhardware and software
is so easily bypassable by those with truly high end
technical talent. You really DO need a secured operating system
and Windows ain't a secure operating system (Trusted Solaris is/was)
some versions of ATT UNIX were/are and of course certain distros of Linux.

Hardware comes into it and when someone like me can just resign
a custom version of a System32/SysWOW64 DLL that has the same
CRC (Cycle Redunancy Check) checksum and byte-size as the original
DLL (Dynamic Link Library) but with my OWN version of the exported
Windows library functions and then force Windows to run it, then
that ain't real security!

You need a combination of software and trusted hardware
in order to get real security. The biggest problem is that
Windows IS rather easy-to-use for end-users which makes
Microsoft ever-richer in terms of sales of Server-OS'es
and Client-OS'es. Too many Linux distros are made for
techies and code-geeks like me and until that's fixed,
operating system security will continue to be compromised!



posted on May, 9 2016 @ 03:49 PM
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originally posted by: StargateSG7
You really DO need a secured operating system

Do I? Why?



posted on May, 9 2016 @ 03:56 PM
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a reply to: Vroomfondel

A bios update doesn't help?



posted on May, 9 2016 @ 04:40 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP

originally posted by: StargateSG7
You really DO need a secured operating system

Do I? Why?


---

OK! So if you're an end-user with only family photos
and some music on your computer, the only security
you need is some MULTIPLE backups of those photos
and music onsite (at home ) and at least one copy offsite.

Now for companies like the one I work for where we
store things like "The Answer to Life, the Universe and
Everything - aka 42" on our servers, then our ridiculous
security protocols make sense.

I suggest going for a Macbook Air --- you will like it
better than Windows...just remember to backup
your files to a portable drive at least one a week.


edit on 2016/5/9 by StargateSG7 because: sp



posted on May, 9 2016 @ 04:41 PM
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a reply to: Vroomfondel

Got hit by this and just got Ubuntu installed. Gonna miss you Win 7.



posted on May, 9 2016 @ 05:30 PM
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originally posted by: Cauliflower
a reply to: vethumanbeing

So for a new system its best to do a clean Vanilla install of windows 7 then create a backup image on flash or CD?
And of coarse before you create that image you have to install all the recommended updates minus the ones that autoupdate windows 10 and Bing. The Windows 7 disk I bought came with a COA code but do they have a simple repair function to restore just the key system files without overlaying your existing programs and settings?.

Windows 10 has to threaten me bodily harm first (I am waiting); otherwise to do as you say would be an alternative *recourse* pending potential attack.
edit on 9-5-2016 by vethumanbeing because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2016 @ 05:55 PM
link   

originally posted by: StargateSG7

originally posted by: ArMaP

originally posted by: StargateSG7
But for GENERAL OS security you can use a highly secured version
of Linux and replace all FileOpen and Malloc() calls to do what we
call Ring-0 inspection and protection of data and code to PREVENT
saves and loads of disk-based data and executable code from ANY
OTHER folder, file or memory location that is NOT on a hard-coded
protection list.

I have a simpler suggestion: for general OS security, learn about it and how to use it.



So again, get rid of Windows 10 and goto a Secure Linux Distro!

No thanks, I'm good.


---

The problem is that m,odernhardware and software
is so easily bypassable by those with truly high end
technical talent. You really DO need a secured operating system
and Windows ain't a secure operating system (Trusted Solaris is/was)
some versions of ATT UNIX were/are and of course certain distros of Linux.

Hardware comes into it and when someone like me can just resign
a custom version of a System32/SysWOW64 DLL that has the same
CRC (Cycle Redunancy Check) checksum and byte-size as the original
DLL (Dynamic Link Library) but with my OWN version of the exported
Windows library functions and then force Windows to run it, then
that ain't real security!

You need a combination of software and trusted hardware
in order to get real security. The biggest problem is that
Windows IS rather easy-to-use for end-users which makes
Microsoft ever-richer in terms of sales of Server-OS'es
and Client-OS'es. Too many Linux distros are made for
techies and code-geeks like me and until that's fixed,
operating system security will continue to be compromised!

I think this is OTT but you have a very solid attitude, practice like this will make sure that your loved photos are never lost and i applaud you for taking such measures.



edit on b5757519 by Biigs because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2016 @ 07:00 PM
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originally posted by: StargateSG7
I suggest going for a Macbook Air --- you will like it
better than Windows...just remember to backup
your files to a portable drive at least one a week.

A Mac? No, thanks, I don't like Apple's idea of how an operating system should work with the user.

Also, I don't have money even for a cheap Android tablet, much less a Mac.



posted on May, 9 2016 @ 09:33 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP

originally posted by: charlyv
The trouble is, you sit down with one workstation to work on , that has not been modified by the company IT's, and you have to go through 10 minutes of getting a usable working setup , otherwise you waste a half hour or more, clicking through needless buried crap.

I am also the company's IT department.


Well then I would count you as part of the solution that allows this beast into corporate America. This is still a large resistance. The acceptability really comes by the adoption of W2k12, which by server standards, is very powerful, but has an even weaker visual interface by comparison, for server management.
edit on 9-5-2016 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught



posted on May, 10 2016 @ 02:56 AM
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a reply to: charlyv

Being in Portugal, I doubt I can make any difference in corporate America.


I haven't seen W2k12 yet.



posted on May, 10 2016 @ 04:40 AM
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originally posted by: ventian
a reply to: Vroomfondel

Got hit by this and just got Ubuntu installed. Gonna miss you Win 7.


Why even know it's gone?

Mint (or similar) with a Windows 7 theme will be quicker and 98% more secure than Windows.

Ubuntu is alright but for 20 mins of dl'ing you can get something that is hard to tell apart.

www.noobslab.com...



edit on 10-5-2016 by Jukiodone because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 10 2016 @ 04:52 AM
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a reply to: Vroomfondel
I have a question regarding Asus monitors. I have a 24" Asus and am preparing to buy a new 27" from NewEgg later this afternoon. Would you recommend buying a different brand monitor? I've had my current monitor for over 4 years and it has been good until recently when it started flickering black occasionally. I really would hate to waste the money though if it has issues.



posted on May, 10 2016 @ 05:23 AM
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a reply to: beachpeach

Not vroomfondel, but I've got two 2K Asus monitors in front of me as I'm typing this. They're ok. I also have a lot of Benq monitors back at work, and if I had my druthers, I'd choose more Benqs, but just because I like the color balance better. Not for performance.

Benq has a warmer tone, and has less blue backlighting. It's easier on your eyes for a long term stare.



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