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The National Trail System: a list of the 6 Major U.S. Hiking Trails

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posted on May, 4 2016 @ 09:35 PM
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Posted by: Robert Richardson

"The National Trails System Act created the National Trails System on October 2, 1968. This Act created a series of trails and connecting side trails throughout the United States."

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offgridsurvival.com...
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The Pacific Crest Trail
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The Pacific Crest Trail (also known as the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail) is a long distance mountain hiking and horseback trail that goes from the United States border with Mexico to the border of Canada. The trail goes up through the states of California, Oregon, and Washington.
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The Pacific Trail is 2,650 miles long and runs parallel to the Pacific Ocean. The trail follows the highest parts of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade Ranges, and also dips down to just about sea level when going through the Oregon Washington border.
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The trail can take around 4 – 6 months to complete and on average only 180 people complete it each year. The trail goes through some of the most extreme wilderness in the USA.
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Once upon a time . . . a much younger time, in my life . . . I had fantasies of hiking the Pacific Crest Trail. I studied what was needed a fair amount.

Alas, life raced along and I never carved out the extra money or time sufficient to do it. Nor did I have anyone that eager to do it with me, in my social network. LOL.

I think this article gives a good overview of each of the major trails.

Amazon.com has some good videos available in Amazon Prime of folks who have hiked the Pacific Crest and Appalachian trails. I found them worth the time given my strong interest in such a trek.

It takes a lot of planning with resupplies mailed at strategic times and post offices along the way. And the boots probably need to be broken in ahead of time. LOL.

If you love the outdoors and backpacking . . . there's nothing quite like such a long trek, imho.

At my age . . . I much prefer my Tempurpedic to backpacking mattresses. Guess I've gotten softer in my old age. Though I never did enjoy rocks under my sleeping. LOL.

Cheers.




posted on May, 4 2016 @ 09:44 PM
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a reply to: BO XIAN

I've hiked the Long Trail, Appalachian Trail, and then also covered a lot of ground in Utah/Colorado in the Rocky Mtns. Colorado was mostly desert landscape and I really appreciated the cool trees and other larger wildlife I encountered. The trees were especially cool to me out there. They look like those ones you see in Africa - thick trunks, curvy and bulbous. Amazing landscapes... out here its tons of conifers, birches, tons of taller, skinnier trees and greener lushness.. typically smaller-sized wildlife (other than maybe moose -even the bears are typically smaller out east)
edit on 4-5-2016 by FamCore because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2016 @ 09:46 PM
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a reply to: FamCore

Much appreciate your sharing your experiences.

May I ask . . . what 3-5 most memorable things (memories, growth, insights, whatever) did you take from hiking the Long Trail?



posted on May, 4 2016 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: BO XIAN

1. wet socks

2. deer (/goat?) skull and other bones with skin still on it and a super gnarly rotten smell that makes me gag to this day

3. bashing my kneecap when hiking up a mountain in VT

4. other group of hikers we met who were from New Zealand

5. being totally disconnected from electronics, the news, the stock market, all of it. **** I need some of that again..



posted on May, 4 2016 @ 10:05 PM
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Ive hiked the pacific Crest trail. Had a great time. I started at the peak of Carson pass. There are Bears and Mountain Lions and other animals up there. The fishing in some lakes is awesone. We caught well over 100 pink flesh brook trout in 4th of July Lake. I hiked the Crest trail several years. It gets ruged in places. Im getting up there in years now and some of those mountains are a biotch to get over, even for a young man



posted on May, 4 2016 @ 10:10 PM
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PS you can legally carrie on the trails per the rangers. It cannot be concealed though. Other hikers kind of trip sometimes when they see you packing though. I did fire warning shots to scare off a bear in our camp/I carried all these side arms, and a short barrel 12 gade shotgun as well.



posted on May, 4 2016 @ 10:17 PM
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a reply to: FamCore

Interesting that 3 of your items were troublesome! LOL.

I think meeting interesting people out and about like that is often a treasure.

Yeah, being away from tech and "civilization" is usually a restorative treat.

Thanks for your kind reply.



posted on May, 4 2016 @ 10:19 PM
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a reply to: visitedbythem

Thanks. Sounds wise to pack a firearm (impressive array!), for sure. Congrats on your accomplishments.

What are your more memorable things you took from your experiences?

If you were 20 years old again, what would you do differently about such hiking?

edit on 4/5/2016 by BO XIAN because: added



posted on May, 4 2016 @ 10:38 PM
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I have many pictures/ I think they are on my older PC in the other room/ I would like to share crest pics with you sometime. It is a beautiful place. I have to get to bed now and work 12 hour shifts the next two days, but after tha Iwill find some pics to share with you



posted on May, 4 2016 @ 10:55 PM
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a reply to: visitedbythem

Sounds wonderful. I hope you share a good sample on this thread.

I hope you have pleasant and successful work shifts.



posted on May, 4 2016 @ 11:12 PM
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a reply to: BO XIAN



If you love the outdoors and backpacking . . . there's nothing quite like such a long trek, imho.


Its a lot better in your imaginations then actuality.

I did a portion of the AT intended to go to Maine..

Man, its no fun to carry a 50 lb pack up and down mountains, especially if it rains or drizzles several days in a row and you cannot get dry, and all your stuff gets wet and heavy.

With the AT, the reality is that often it goes alongside residential neighborhoods, and then you may go through some parks that are really nice. The reality, at least on the East coast is that it does not get too remote, maybe some parts up north.

I think the best thing to do is to drive to the nicest parks and then start exploring from there without having to walk a million miles to see them. And if you had enough after 2 weeks you can just go back to your car drive home.



posted on May, 4 2016 @ 11:20 PM
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a reply to: nOraKat

Worthy points. Particularly for physically challenged oldsters.

Out West, the scenery is usually quite splendid and extensive for mile after mile.

Yeah, it's a lot of too often dreary drudgery in many respects. And wet packs (preventable) and wet sleeping bags (almost always preventable with good gear and habits) are horrible to deal with.

I had a large A-16 aluminum backpack that had a great hip-belt design and would stand up on it's own when off. It could hold all I'd like to carry, for sure. I loved such backpacking experiences with loved ones to a high mountain lake etc. etc. It was enriching to my soul and usually to the relationships.

Now . . . I'll let younger folks manage it. LOL.



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 06:06 AM
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a reply to: BO XIAN

It depends on the frequency of the rain.. if you get a spell of several days, it is impossible to keep dry w the best habits. For example imagine putting your tent and things away in the rain. Your tent itself will be wet and you have to carry that, and while putting things away things are bound to get wet. Even with the best Gortex clothing you get wet one way or another. Damp and moist clothing never dries out and starts to smell. Socks will certainly get wet or moist and you run out and then you just have to wear wet socks which makes you prone to blisters.

One reason why I mostly go on short trips or day-hikes now ..



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 08:43 AM
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a reply to: nOraKat

Plenty true. I've never backpacked in regions that prone to rain for that long a period.

I suppose there's a risk of that in the Northern end of the Pacific Crest trail.

Yeah . . . I don't even do short overnights any more. I kind of miss it. But not enough to pay the price of an uncomfortable bed. LOL.



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