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Why isnt the moon obscured by atmospheric particles?

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posted on May, 3 2016 @ 01:43 AM
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If you were to look at a distant mountain it appears hazy and blurred and you cannot see any features on it.


This is caused by suspended atmospheric particles, vapor, smog etc.

Yet the moon which is much further from our eye than mountains appears so crystal clear you could almost count the craters on it.

So why is this?

edit on 3-5-2016 by clevargenuis because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-5-2016 by clevargenuis because: (no reason given)



+7 more 
posted on May, 3 2016 @ 01:44 AM
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Because the Moon is one of them hollowgrams.



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 01:47 AM
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I am absolutely no expert on anything like this... So if I am wrong then I apologise.

But is it possibly due to differences in atmospheric density the higher up you go? Among other things I imagine.





posted on May, 3 2016 @ 01:48 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
Because the Moon is one of them hollowgrams.


its a legitimete question. Maybe I'll just wait for someone who actually knows about this matter.



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 01:52 AM
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If you were to look at a distant mountain it appears hazy and blurred and you cannot see any features on it.


That depends on the weather condition.


edit on 3-5-2016 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 01:54 AM
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Can't give you a detailed reply, but part of it is the moon is really big.
And, though it is really far away, once you get past the atmosphere space is well, empty space. More or less.
And the higher you go, the less particles you run into, while particles tend to be held close to the ground.



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 01:55 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Dude, you've been here to long. Take a holiday somewhere more sensible. Like Unexplained Mysteries.



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 02:00 AM
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originally posted by: clevargenuis
If you were to look at a distant mountain it appears hazy and blurred and you cannot see any features on it.


This is caused by suspended atmospheric particles, vapor, smog etc.

Yet the moon which is much further from our eye than mountains appears so crystal clear you could almost count the craters on it.

So why is this?


Have a look at high high the atmosphere goes, and how much dust/moisture is in it, compared to how much dust/moisture is close to the ground.



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 02:00 AM
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originally posted by: RuneSpider
Can't give you a detailed reply, but part of it is the moon is really big.
And, though it is really far away, once you get past the atmosphere space is well, empty space. More or less.
And the higher you go, the less particles you run into, while particles tend to be held close to the ground.


yeah but if your on earth youre still looking at the moon THROUGH atmospheric particles.

if a mountain a few miles away is so hazy, you shouldnt be able to see far away moon craters in such clarity and detail.



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 02:01 AM
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a reply to: clevargenuis

As he said, the higher you go the less particles there are to block your view








posted on May, 3 2016 @ 02:01 AM
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originally posted by: hellobruce

originally posted by: clevargenuis
If you were to look at a distant mountain it appears hazy and blurred and you cannot see any features on it.


This is caused by suspended atmospheric particles, vapor, smog etc.

Yet the moon which is much further from our eye than mountains appears so crystal clear you could almost count the craters on it.

So why is this?


Have a look at high high the atmosphere goes, and how much dust/moisture is in it, compared to how much dust/moisture is close to the ground.


between your eye and the moon there is a lot of dust and moisture. but you still see the moon so clearly.



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 02:04 AM
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a reply to: brace22

Yes, pretty much. If you look out (horizontally) you have all sorts in the air that obscures the view to the horizon. If you look up then you are not layering the means to obscure.

That said, on a cloudy night you cannot see the moon.



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 02:05 AM
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a reply to: RuneSpider

most of the atmosphere is only about 10 miles thats the troposphere the part where the particals u speak of mainly are

when looking at a mountan at a distance its probly alot farther away than just 10 miles



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 02:05 AM
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During the day the atmosphere is more prone to having suspended moisture due to the heat of the sun, when the sun goes down the atmosphere cools and moisture falls to the ground and thus the night sky is a little clearer. Either that or someone turns on the Hologram Projector.



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 02:06 AM
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a reply to: paraphi

LOL I am completely surprised nobody has said something about clouds. But I guess the OP was basing it on a cloudless day.


Thanks for clearing that up!







posted on May, 3 2016 @ 02:06 AM
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originally posted by: clevargenuis

originally posted by: RuneSpider
Can't give you a detailed reply, but part of it is the moon is really big.
And, though it is really far away, once you get past the atmosphere space is well, empty space. More or less.
And the higher you go, the less particles you run into, while particles tend to be held close to the ground.


yeah but if your on earth youre still looking at the moon THROUGH atmospheric particles.

if a mountain a few miles away is so hazy, you shouldnt be able to see far away moon craters in such clarity and detail.

But there is a big difference in a few miles along the ground, and a few miles straight up.
I have to assume you've been on an airplane?
If you have, remember looking out the window.
From that vantage point you can see much further out to the horizon than you can from ground level, even taking into account obstacles.
Air pressure and particles drop off quickly the higher you go.



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 02:08 AM
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a reply to: markovian

Also, without a telescope you really can't make out to much detail.



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 02:11 AM
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Also there is a reason for observatories to be placed high.




Optical telescope observatories are built on high ground above the thickest layers of Earth's atmosphere. Astronomers can see into space more clearly



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 02:17 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
Because the Moon is one of them hollowgrams.

Paging Phage, please report to illumicorp headquarters asap.


a reply to: clevargenuis
I think you think you know more than you do.



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 02:19 AM
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originally posted by: brace22
a reply to: clevargenuis

As he said, the higher you go the less particles there are to block your view




sure theres less atmosphere particles as you go higher.

but we look at the moon standing on earth. thE atmosphere and vapor is still there yet the moon is seen cleary.



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