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TTip leak. Greenpeace releases documents on Monday.

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posted on May, 1 2016 @ 10:35 PM
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a reply to: Phage

What products is China buying from us




posted on May, 1 2016 @ 10:36 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Kudos! The last response to onequestion has just given me a brief
but elegant definition of supercapitalism. Sorry about the seven
syllables I dislike them too-- but for every commercial success there
must be many failures and scores more losers.
However,
Russia passed the GMO labeling law first, with the US foot dragging
nicely behind to the extent of pushing the car in front to slow it down.
The hand over fist and under the table greasing up of appendages
[between the Monsanto war chest and the US Congress] is the second
biggest public joke since psychotropic drugs were "OK'd".

www.trueactivist.com...

Google the Monsanto Protection Act. It doesn't matter if Obama
Bush, or reanimated Reagan signs it into law.. it's in HR933, Phage.
And my money, sadly is on Monsanto winning this one too.

www.ibtimes.com...
edit on 1-5-2016 by derfreebie because: Link to the Bizzaria Backwards Beltway (or B3) Solution



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 10:38 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: Phage

What products are we selling to China and in what quantity

China is the third largest export market for US goods after Canada and Mexico. Try taking some time to search than respond with one liners filled with angst.

It's to ensure America stays relevant in an evolving global economy. Not one I agree with per se, but until you and I get a hold of the reins, we are the caboose.


China continues to be an important contributor to US economic growth. In 2014, US exports to China totaled $120 billion, making it the third-largest export market for US goods behind Canada and Mexico, our neighbors and NAFTA partners.

Though the value of US exports to China last year was largely unchanged from 2013, China’s market continues to be a top destination for US goods. On average, US exports to China grew by nearly 13 percent annually over the past 10 years. Comparatively, US exports to Mexico, Germany, and the United Kingdom averaged 8.1, 4.3, and 3.6 percent annual growth, respectively.

Over the last decade, US exports to China have grown faster than exports to any other major US trading partner. From 2005 to 2014, US exports to China increased 198 percent. That is greater than growth to any of the other top ten US export markets, including the two largest US trading partners, Canada (47 percent growth) and Mexico (102 percent growth).

China’s economy is undergoing important changes that have resulted in a slowdown in GDP and trade growth. As China’s market matures, that growth is likely to remain at lower rates than seen in past years. At the same time, China is seeking to rebalance its economy toward a consumerdriven growth model. With this shift, US companies are expected to have broader opportunities to export more goods and services to meet the needs of China’s growing middle class.

Exports play an essential role in the US economy and job growth. In 2014, US exports to China helped support a wide range of industries including transportation equipment, crop production, computers and electronics, and chemicals, along with export-related jobs in America’s port cities. Not only are exports vital to the health of US industry, global exports also supported 11.7 million US jobs in 2014, according to the US Department of Commerce.

China: An important market for US goods

Forty-two states experienced at least triple-digit export growth to China since 2005, and five states saw export growth of more than 500 percent over the same period.

China was among the top three export markets for 39 states in 2014. That includes states that are not usually associated with strong China trade ties, including Minnesota, Michigan, New York, Alabama, Ohio, and South Carolina.

In 2014, thirty-one states exported more than $1 billion to China.

While larger states like Texas and California saw significant growth in exports to China, smaller states benefited, too. Delaware, Kentucky, West Virginia, and Nevada all experienced more than 300 percent growth in exports over the past decade.

Link

edit on 2-5-2016 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 10:41 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: Phage

What products is China buying from us

Cars
Semiconductors
Soybeans

$120 billion. Who's going to buy that stuff?
www.uschina.org...



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 10:49 PM
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a reply to: derfreebie




Google the Monsanto Protection Act. It doesn't matter if Obama Bush, or reanimated Reagan signed it into law.. it's in there.

Oh. I'm quite aware of the act. It expired a couple of years ago, btw. And it did not say what you think it said. You see, I actually read the law because if what was said about it was true it would have been quite outrageous. Did you read the law?
www.abovetopsecret.com...

edit on 5/1/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 10:54 PM
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a reply to: Phage

I'm not one of those people. DOWN WITH THE SYSTEM! Isolationism > all.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 10:54 PM
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originally posted by: Phage

originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: Phage

What products is China buying from us

Cars
Semiconductors
Soybeans

$120 billion. Who's going to buy that stuff?
www.uschina.org...


Were losing hundreds of millions of dollars more than were gaining from the relationship with China.

So if we stop buying 350 billion dollars worth of goods from China we can ma ufacrure those goods here and offset the "gain" by many more billions of dollars

I feel like I'm talking to children



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 10:56 PM
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originally posted by: SmurfRider
a reply to: Phage

I'm not one of those people. DOWN WITH THE SYSTEM! Isolationism > all.


They are not making logical sense.

He thinks that it's worth losing 350 billion dollars a year in order to gain 120 billion dollars a year is a good deal.

It's completely ******



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 11:05 PM
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originally posted by: SmurfRider
a reply to: Phage

I'm not one of those people. DOWN WITH THE SYSTEM! Isolationism > all.


If your running a business and your business spends 3x what it makes than your going to go out of business.

That's really how simple it is.

He makes absolutely no sense at all it's completely illogical



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 11:12 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: Phage

What products are we selling to China and in what quantity


I would guess were not selling much manufactured goods to China, natural resources would be my guess. Just like third world countries.

I do wonder how much gmo rice we export to China? Or is there still a worldwide ban on gmo rice?



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 11:16 PM
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a reply to: LDragonFire

And that's exactly my point.

We have more leverage than they do in our trade deals and they are taking full advantage of us.

These people are totally clueless

They NEED what they get from us but we can make what we get from them


We should be winning in that situation not losing
edit on 5/1/2016 by onequestion because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 11:20 PM
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This sounds less like a Trade Deal and more like the relationship between a Pimp and his B*tches.

Every now and then a Good Pimp has to extend his Pimp Hand to a few of his ladies to make sure they come up with their share of the profits and do what they're told. If not, they get the Pimp Hand which sets them straight.

International Corporations have built up quite a strong Pimp Hand to just slap another country into agreeing to work against themselves like that.

"Oh, you don't want my big GMO piece of Meat??? Well, you gonna take it anyway, B*tch!!! Or I'm bringin out the Pimp Hand, bebe."


No sir, that doesn't sound like a friendly Trade Deal to me.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 11:21 PM
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a reply to: mOjOm

These trade deals are never good for the people they are supposedly.meant to serve they are for the major shareholders and the Elite that's it



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 11:27 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
These trade deals are never good for the people they are supposedly.meant to serve they are for the major shareholders and the Elite that's it


Makes you wonder how many of those Shareholders are also sitting somewhere in Government too. Or just close enough to stay legal with plausible deniability that is.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 11:32 PM
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a reply to: mOjOm

They just get positions in the company when they retire making five times the position is really worth of give speeches



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 11:34 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

Yep, you're correct on that one too.

Goldman Sachs was buying their soon to be Ex-First Woman President for later use no doubt.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 11:38 PM
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a reply to: mOjOm

Was it really a speech is what everyone should be asking



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 11:44 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

Were losing hundreds of millions of dollars more than were gaining from the relationship with China.
Buying something does not mean you are losing money. It means you are spending money. Buying and selling are not the same thing. Losing money would mean selling a product for less than it costs to produce it.


So if we stop buying 350 billion dollars worth of goods from China we can ma ufacrure those goods here and offset the "gain" by many more billions of dollars
How much would those products cost if they were manufactured here? Would people buy them? Why, if they are more expensive? Why would manufacturers produce something if it means that people won't buy them or would lose money selling them?



I feel like I'm talking to children
You aren't.
edit on 5/1/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 11:53 PM
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originally posted by: Phage

You ain't one of them commies, are you?



Why don't you ask the American Corporations about that, that got in bed with Communist China?

You do know 250 Million Chinese had their lands stolen and bull dozed over and forced to go work in the cities?
That is how Communism works, which you seem to support



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 11:55 PM
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a reply to: jacobe001




That is how Communism works, which you seem to support

No.
I don't support communism. Quite the opposite, if anything. I think private ownership is a far superior system to government ownership.

Seems the Chinese have been realizing that more and more. Privatization of industry has been increasing there.


edit on 5/1/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)




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