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If it isn't 100% organic, it's probably not organic.

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posted on May, 1 2016 @ 04:43 PM
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a reply to: McSwifty
Oh, sorry. I bow to your superior and healthy palate.

That would be an interesting taste test though.




posted on May, 1 2016 @ 04:48 PM
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originally posted by: SomeDumbBroad
a reply to: McSwifty

I agree with you on the taste and that's what I have been trying to do for the last year. There is such an insane difference in taste once it becomes a habit but then I get to thinking about the fact that there are things that taste good that aren't good for you and that's when I sit down and end up doing random research and coming up with posts like these.


The important thing is it should taste good in it's whole unprocessed state, an organic whole sweet potato tastes amazing just on it's own but a conventional one will require a little salt or other seasoning to make it taste as good.

Give me an example of something that you can make a meal of in it's whole unprocessed state that is bad for us?



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: SomeDumbBroad

I don't want you to stop asking questions. I just want you to ask the right people. People who have legitimate scientific/medical credentials.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 04:55 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: McSwifty
Oh, sorry. I bow to your superior and healthy palate.

That would be an interesting taste test though.


Your taste buds can completely revert to their natural state in 2 weeks in the abstinence of the various toxic substances we bombard ourselves with, nothing superior about my taste buds mate!.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 05:13 PM
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originally posted by: McSwifty
Give me an example of something that you can make a meal of in it's whole unprocessed state that is bad for us?


Kidney beans.

Manioc.

Bitter almonds.

Fava beans.

Some strains of butterbeans, especially if bugs are gnawing on them.

Taro.

Parsnips.

Chaya.

Yucca.

Pork, in general. Common to have trich.

Bear meat, in general. Most bear has trich.

Raccoon, in general. Same as bears and pork.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 05:16 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam




Taro.

Oh my. Yes. Ouchy.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 05:20 PM
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a reply to: McSwifty

For me? I can't have any cruciferous vegetables because they interfere with my body absorbing the TSH hormone. When I say cant I mean it is recommended for me to not have them, not that I will die if I have them.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 05:29 PM
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a reply to: SomeDumbBroad

Have you ever heard of the "low fodmap" diet, it is for people who have trouble digesting certain food groups.....

Worth taking a look at if you have not......It worked for my girlfriend....



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 05:37 PM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

I have not heard of it. I shall check it out.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 11:11 PM
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a reply to: SomeDumbBroad

It's a way to eliminate food groups and slowly reintroduce them into your diet, monitor how you are feeling and hopefully identify the food group that is causing you trouble.....good luck
edit on 1-5-2016 by hopenotfeariswhatweneed because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 12:21 AM
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originally posted by: projectvxn
a reply to: angryhulk

You are welcome to dismiss it.

It's a blogger with Scientific American.

Moreover the source material she uses is of importance. But by all means avoid it at all costs to save your preconceived notions from rebuttal.

Edit:

By the way, the writer of the blog post isn't a nobody. Her name is Dr. Christie Wilcox


Dr. Christie Wilcox is a science writer, social media specialist, and post-doctoral scholar at the University of Hawaii. Here you can learn more about her dual-sided professional life, including her award-winning blogging, traditional and peer-reviewed publications and scientific research.


Blog:

So was I, when I first learned this from a guy I was dating.


From your blog. That's the writer discussing how she learned about the use of pesticides in organic produce. Yes OK I'll believe your 'source'. Haha.
edit on 5/2/16 by angryhulk because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 06:12 AM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: McSwifty
Give me an example of something that you can make a meal of in it's whole unprocessed state that is bad for us?


Kidney beans.

Manioc.

Bitter almonds.

Fava beans.

Some strains of butterbeans, especially if bugs are gnawing on them.

Taro.

Parsnips.

Chaya.

Yucca.

Pork, in general. Common to have trich.

Bear meat, in general. Most bear has trich.

Raccoon, in general. Same as bears and pork.





Most of those do not taste good in their whole unprocessed state with the exception of the root vegetables you listed, there are populations that thrive on them, like i said, the key is they need to taste good in their whole unprocessed state so that you can eat a whole meal of them (12-1500 calories).
edit on 2-5-2016 by McSwifty because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-5-2016 by McSwifty because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-5-2016 by McSwifty because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 06:21 AM
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originally posted by: SomeDumbBroad
a reply to: McSwifty

For me? I can't have any cruciferous vegetables because they interfere with my body absorbing the TSH hormone. When I say cant I mean it is recommended for me to not have them, not that I will die if I have them.


Yeah you may want to moderate or even cut out goitrogenic food for a period of 30 days or so, if you stick to a whole foods plant based diet you will find that your food intolerance's will diminish substantially. Think whole fruits/vegetables/grains/pulses go easy on the seasoning for at least 30 days and i promise you will feel 100 times better and your body will thank you for it
.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 06:22 AM
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a reply to: angryhulk

"It's a blog" is not a valid excuse when it's a well-sourced article written by a scientist and science communicator for a reputable scientific magazine.

So what specific claims in the article are you objecting to?



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 09:51 AM
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originally posted by: GetHyped
a reply to: angryhulk

"It's a blog" is not a valid excuse when it's a well-sourced article written by a scientist and science communicator for a reputable scientific magazine.

So what specific claims in the article are you objecting to?


Referring to somebody she dated is "well sourced"..? Sorry mate I don't care how many acronyms somebody has after their name it does not make them any more reputable than the next guy. I will trust the governing bodies sources over the opinion of a lady who dated a guy that farmed. It's funny your trying to tell me otherwise to be honest.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 10:16 AM
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a reply to: angryhulk

Read the article. It's got sources for the various claims she makes.

What specific claims are you objecting to? The fact you dismiss the numerous sources as "somebody she dated" shows you have neither read the article or have the reading comprehension of a seamonkey.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 10:56 AM
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When considering the "organic-ness" of foodstuffs, one may have to consider how organic the fertilizers and "natural" pesticides are. Using manure that is "all natural" has it's problems with e. coli contamination and may have problems with the source. Were the producers of such natural stuff hormone free? Was the grass they grazed on free of pesticides and falling particulate matter? If they were corn fed, was the corn GMO? Have pesticides? Synthetic ammonia may be a much better fertilizer.
Unrestricted chemophobia is a common affliction. As has been said, the poison's in the dose. The sigmoidal dose-response curve says that at some point, there will be no biological response to components in low concentrations. Where one draws the line is a marketing opportunity.

Now for a paleo salad of poison ivy leaves.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 11:20 AM
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And...'natural' on a label means nothing. You have to be REALLY careful with labels.

I recently noticed on Vitamin Water it claims to have electrolytes. Yet on the Nutrition Facts it has 0 Sodium. Magnesium, Potassium and Calcium have the cross- meaning 'not a significant source' and Chloride and Phosphates aren't even listed.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 11:57 AM
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a reply to: angryhulk

You've put zero effort in so I expect nothing less from you.

No one likes to be wrong.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 01:11 PM
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originally posted by: McSwifty

originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: McSwifty
Give me an example of something that you can make a meal of in it's whole unprocessed state that is bad for us?


Kidney beans.

Manioc.

Bitter almonds.

Fava beans.

Some strains of butterbeans, especially if bugs are gnawing on them.

Taro.

Parsnips.

Chaya.

Yucca.

Pork, in general. Common to have trich.

Bear meat, in general. Most bear has trich.

Raccoon, in general. Same as bears and pork.





Most of those do not taste good in their whole unprocessed state with the exception of the root vegetables you listed, there are populations that thrive on them, like i said, the key is they need to taste good in their whole unprocessed state so that you can eat a whole meal of them (12-1500 calories).


Speak for yourself! I used to graze through the garden as a kid, I'm surprised I didn't get butterbean poisoning. I've decimated whole rows.

Also, nothing like bear sushi. Um, um!



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