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California PC Police Dishonor "The Duke"

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posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 04:31 PM
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a reply to: LSU0408
Wayne called them as he saw them. He was born in 1907 and was exposed to the culture and consensus of the times, more than a century ago. Then, he was lost in the unreal fantasy land of Hollywood which did nothing to change his opinions. To express those opinions late in his life is hardly shocking. So he didn't get some honor or another from the California Assembly. It's just the usual left coast political maneuvering by the "more liberal than you" crew.

As has been posted earlier, many of our human icons have feet of clay, including MLK. What would he say about the unintended consequences of the social programs of the 1960's?




posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 04:39 PM
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Individuals tend to take this statement out of context, as he also said, “we can't all of a sudden get down on our knees and turn everything over to the leadership of blacks.” Which is true, and it is not a racist statement in context. He believed in gradual integration, and I think an honest look at the era would realize that he was basing this on the integration of aspects in that era of public education. 

 He believed that blacks had an honest right to feel resentment toward and to dissent regarding their treatment. Hardly the view of a racist. He worked with many blacks, including Scatman Crothers and Roscoe Lee Brown, and got along quite well with them. One should also take into account that not only did he have black friends (like Sammy Davis Jr.), but he had no problem in casting blacks in his films (such as James Watkins, who played J.C. in the film McQ, and Sidney Poitier in one of his first films and cast by Wayne in a lead role), and was married to three Latin American women during his life. 

He also made a comment regarding Hollywood trying to keep an equal quota at the time for production crews. There were not 10% of trained individuals to perform and meet that quota margin.

He did not dislike blacks for the sake of being black, and he tended to accept people based on their character rather than the color of their skin. So no, he wasn’t racist. He may have been Racially insensitive from a politically correct standpoint, but he was far from racist.



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 05:30 PM
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I cant wait to interject how big Bill Cosby affected my childhoo.... no the Dukes of Hazzar....
Nope erased from time as well... gosh Dang It ATS.

Remember that one time Kobe Bryant.... nope Ben Roethlisberger. ..

Context...

Tarnished! All Of It.... even Paula Deen😕


I cast the first stone ... nope😉
edit on 29-4-2016 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)


My head is spinning after reading all of this and wondering what to do😮
edit on 29-4-2016 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 05:47 PM
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originally posted by: Annee


Jimmy Stewart would be a much better candidate for honoring the man.



That's Brigadier General James Stewart USAF, holder of the Croix de Guerre and Distinguished Flying Cross, veteran of the air war over Germany.

What did John Wayne do during the war?



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 05:50 PM
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originally posted by: CynConcepts
Individuals tend to take this statement out of context, as he also said, “we can't all of a sudden get down on our knees and turn everything over to the leadership of blacks.” Which is true, and it is not a racist statement in context. He believed in gradual integration, and I think an honest look at the era would realize that he was basing this on the integration of aspects in that era of public education. 

 He believed that blacks had an honest right to feel resentment toward and to dissent regarding their treatment. Hardly the view of a racist. He worked with many blacks, including Scatman Crothers and Roscoe Lee Brown, and got along quite well with them. One should also take into account that not only did he have black friends (like Sammy Davis Jr.), but he had no problem in casting blacks in his films (such as James Watkins, who played J.C. in the film McQ, and Sidney Poitier in one of his first films and cast by Wayne in a lead role), and was married to three Latin American women during his life. 

He also made a comment regarding Hollywood trying to keep an equal quota at the time for production crews. There were not 10% of trained individuals to perform and meet that quota margin.

He did not dislike blacks for the sake of being black, and he tended to accept people based on their character rather than the color of their skin. So no, he wasn’t racist. He may have been Racially insensitive from a politically correct standpoint, but he was far from racist.


My dad had black friends and black workmates. The closest he came to being arrested as an adult was standing up for one of his black pals.

But he still hated / hates black people.

According to him, his friends weren't like other black people. We weren't even allowed to watch the Cosby Show because it was "too black".

If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck...
edit on 29-4-2016 by Whodathunkdatcheese because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 06:18 PM
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originally posted by: Whodathunkdatcheese

originally posted by: CynConcepts
Individuals tend to take this statement out of context, as he also said, “we can't all of a sudden get down on our knees and turn everything over to the leadership of blacks.” Which is true, and it is not a racist statement in context. He believed in gradual integration, and I think an honest look at the era would realize that he was basing this on the integration of aspects in that era of public education. 

 He believed that blacks had an honest right to feel resentment toward and to dissent regarding their treatment. Hardly the view of a racist. He worked with many blacks, including Scatman Crothers and Roscoe Lee Brown, and got along quite well with them. One should also take into account that not only did he have black friends (like Sammy Davis Jr.), but he had no problem in casting blacks in his films (such as James Watkins, who played J.C. in the film McQ, and Sidney Poitier in one of his first films and cast by Wayne in a lead role), and was married to three Latin American women during his life. 

He also made a comment regarding Hollywood trying to keep an equal quota at the time for production crews. There were not 10% of trained individuals to perform and meet that quota margin.

He did not dislike blacks for the sake of being black, and he tended to accept people based on their character rather than the color of their skin. So no, he wasn’t racist. He may have been Racially insensitive from a politically correct standpoint, but he was far from racist.


My dad had black friends and black workmates. The closest he came to being arrested as an adult was standing up for one of his black pals.

But he still hated / hates black people.

According to him, his friends weren't like other black people. We weren't even allowed to watch the Cosby Show because it was "too black".

If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck...


The world really needs to get some focus. It is not that an individual speaks for a whole population. We are all individuals with varying differences based on individual personal experiences. Some experiences are childhood bias others majority are actual perceptive experiences. We are ALL humans and individuals. Everyone of us will agree and find ourselves disagreeing. The disagreements among us should not be tallied and grouped into biases!

This whole John Wayne controversy actually began after John Wayne's daughter supported Trump! It is PC proproganda on both sides. I have personally had many different cultural friends and yet, have experienced some situations from some that could have changed my whole world view. Luckily, I had someone instill in me and my multicultural friends that we are not special...we are humans striving to find a happy, successful life and well-being just like the rest of the world.

Equality not specialty...is key.

Edit add: let me add: We are All special as individuals, not as a grouping though!
edit on 4 29 2016 by CynConcepts because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 07:51 PM
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originally posted by: Hazardous1408

originally posted by: LSU0408

originally posted by: harvestdog
a reply to: burdman30ott6

Guess they'll be renaming their airport then. After all it is John Wayne Airport.

Same kind of stupid crap went down Wednesday is Anaheim. Councilwoman Kris Murray tried to pass a resolution to denounce Trump and his supporters. 73 people showed up to give her a piece of their mind


People start coming up and speaking at about 8 minutes 15 seconds and keep going for 2 hours. Local officials think they are big shots all of a sudden, eh.



Wow. Absolutely unbelievable. I can still remember when public officials, even lowly council members, acted like mature adults.


I remember when ATS members acted like mature adults and didn't slink out of the woodwork to excuse blatant racism.

It was much better before they crawled out of their dingy little holes.


"The duke" lol you guys are pricelessly sad.
I know, right? I said it in another thread that this site sure has changed since I first joined in 08. Had to make a new account due to misplacing my password and original email addy. Anyway, I've noticed this as well. It's like some people think that there are no articulate black members of Ats or they know and don't care who they offend. It's all about respect. And everyone needs to stop with the corny ass "PC" labeling. It's old. To be respectful has nothing to do with the "PC" crap. And I'm a proud American black dude and member of ATS.
edit on 29-4-2016 by JimiBlack because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 10:18 PM
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originally posted by: Bigburgh
a reply to: burdman30ott6

I'm so jaded anymore to participate in these discussions. The Duke was a Man of Men. Yes rough around the edges by todays Millenial's standered. He was of a time when 17 year old's joined the military in WW2 and died in Normandy. A time when there was no money to spare.

Now grown men need safe havens from hurtful words. People in positions of power want to erase history over it. History is history for a reason. It's in the past. Either learn from it, or let it go for God's sake.

I'm drowning in a cesspool of Political Correctness..... It's getting to sludgey.

But this needs to be talked about. Thanks OP😊👍


In relation to that,

www.hollywoodreporter.com...



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 11:03 PM
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originally posted by: Kali74
Kind of like the hourly circle jerks about SJW's, Higher Education, white men having it so hard and feminists being evil?


Hark, did I just hear a mic drop?



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 11:19 PM
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originally posted by: Whodathunkdatcheese

originally posted by: Annee


Jimmy Stewart would be a much better candidate for honoring the man.



That's Brigadier General James Stewart USAF, holder of the Croix de Guerre and Distinguished Flying Cross, veteran of the air war over Germany.

What did John Wayne do during the war?


Yep!
He's the man.

Also a Republican.

John Wayne chose to stay in Hollywood. Although, I must say his films did inspire a lot of people. Without intent - - John Wayne probably did more for the military through his films then if he had actually gone.



posted on Apr, 30 2016 @ 03:45 AM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

If the left hates him this much, he must have been doing something right. I never really cared for him before this thread. But, yet again, if he pisses regressives off this much, I need to give John Wayne a chance and watch some of his movies. I think I'll go watch The Longest Day again and then marathon his movies til my eyes bleed.



posted on Apr, 30 2016 @ 04:06 AM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

So some really bad bigoted actor has lost some imagined status because he was an incredibly ignorant bigot, and you are up in arms about it and basically alluding to having some kind of civil war over it, and you have the balls to call OTHERS "Special Snowflakes"?

And once again, "Political Correctness" is nothing but a blanket term thrown around by people who just can't stand the fact that society has moved on beyond their previously excused ignorance.

This isn't "Political Correctness", this is societal evolution, this is the rest of the population telling you that your ignorant, bigoted, disgusting opinions and views are old, outdated, not welcome.

Oh, and before you become that Special Snowflake you accuse others of being by whining about how your "rights and freedoms" are being abused, you can still be that ignorant bigot all you like, the only difference is that you have no say whatsoever over others REJECTING YOU for being so ignorant



posted on Apr, 30 2016 @ 04:13 AM
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originally posted by: Whodathunkdatcheese
According to him, his friends weren't like other black people. We weren't even allowed to watch the Cosby Show because it was "too black".

If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck...


Ah, the stupidity of the average racist, the one so ideologically corrupted by hate that he finds excuses to accept the people he's supposed to hate on their individual merits while still maintaining his disgusting racism.

This is actually pretty common in the racist, because their hatred for others is fundamentally eroded by the experience of actually knowing people of the group they're supposedly hate - and they claim "yeah, but they're DIFFERENT!".

The only difference is that they actually know them, and they find that these people they're supposed to hate are actually exactly like them.

It's proof, if any were needed, that people who preach hatred and ignorance for others of a different group are entirely tribally minded, weak, pathetic followers of a herd mentality. They can't think for themselves and seek out this special "collective" to make themselves feel stronger or part of something.
edit on 30-4-2016 by Rocker2013 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2016 @ 06:39 AM
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a reply to: LSU0408

I'd say the only traumatized ones in this thread are the ones crying because some people disagree with them about giving some throw back to a time when shooting Indians in the name of progress and treating black people as inferior was considered heroic, a holiday.



posted on Apr, 30 2016 @ 08:04 AM
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originally posted by: LSU0408

originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: Hazardous1408




I remember when ATS members acted like mature adults and didn't slink out of the woodwork to excuse blatant racism.

It was much better before they crawled out of their dingy little holes.


"The duke" lol you guys are pricelessly sad.


C'mon, Charlie. Did his words travel across time and oppress someone you know?


I'm sure they do... Look at how them people still ride the coattail of slavery to get pity.
Them people? As in black people? That's rich. Let me tell you something. My dad, both grandfathers, uncles, cousins served honorably in the U.S. military from. World War to till present day and my family has always worked hard and earned every damn thing we have. We didn't " ride the coattails of slavery" as you so eloquently put it. And my paternal grandpa earned a Purple Heart. And to be honest, I couldn't care less about your precious "Duke"
edit on 30-4-2016 by JimiBlack because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2016 @ 08:07 AM
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originally posted by: Kali74
a reply to: LSU0408

I'd say the only traumatized ones in this thread are the ones crying because some people disagree with them about giving some throw back to a time when shooting Indians in the name of progress and treating black people as inferior was considered heroic, a holiday.
I know right? The good ol' days!



posted on Apr, 30 2016 @ 08:43 AM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6



True, but that comment was made at a time when DC was at least less stupid than they are presently.


What?

I think you are just as bad as the PC police you're trying so desperately to shut up. You have a favorite cause and you will defend it no matter how ridiculous it makes you look

Call things what they are - or lose all credibility


edit on 4/30/2016 by Spiramirabilis because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2016 @ 09:04 AM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope




No. Protecting rights such as free speech, freedom of association, and academic freedom are more important than clutching pearls every time someone says something you don't like.


Un-clutch Les

You're protecting freedom of speech? Seriously? Did you think that it was all only supposed to go one way?

Deciding the Duke is not an actual hero (or cowboy deity) is no less legitimate than deciding he is

edit on 4/30/2016 by Spiramirabilis because: a single letter



posted on Apr, 30 2016 @ 10:08 AM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6




Charlie Chaplin did blackface routines... do you really wanna see people's goddamned heads explode by proposing that he get honored?


Context? Or is that less important?

John Wayne said what he said - and we have to assume he meant it. Or was it all an act? Does the act make it less offensive? Should we care if it was offensive - I mean, after all - we're not supposed to be offended by anything now - right?

What was Chaplin saying? You don't get to just do the tit for tat thing. This whole argument about PC is very interesting - isn't it?


Chaplin used African-American stereotypes/humor less than any of the other great star comedians—Roscoe Arbuckle, Harold Lloyd, Buster Keaton, and Harry Langdon—of the entire silent-film era. Chaplin once said of African-Americans, 'I never laugh at their humor. They have suffered too much to be funny to me.' Although one may see an occasional Caucasian in 'blackface' in the background of an early Chaplin comedy, it was the custom of the time; there were few African-Americans actors working in Hollywood in 1914. His Favorite Pastime contains the most extensive examples of blackface and humor at the expense of African-Americans in Chaplin’s work at Keystone.

By Jeffrey Vance, adapted from his book Chaplin: Genius of the Cinema (New York, 2003) (c) 2009 Roy Export SAS

I honestly couldn't find anything else, so - I would appreciate a source when you make comments like that - otherwise, we could all say anything we want to make our point - funny how easy it is - and nobody questions this sort of thing

Anyhow...Jewish folk (as well as all others) in blackface is an interesting subject - not all of it pretty, but on the other hand - art is complicated

Was John Wayne an artist?

:-)



edit on 4/30/2016 by Spiramirabilis because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2016 @ 10:44 AM
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originally posted by: JAY1980

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

Some of his comments were pretty stupid:


"I believe in white supremacy until the blacks are educated to a point of responsibility. I don't believe in giving authority and positions of leadership and judgment to irresponsible people," he told the magazine.


There are some pretty irresponsible crackers in government last time I looked. Like close to 500 of them.


*Sigh* The term "cracker" is worse than anything he said in that quote. Hope your being sarcastic here.
Origins of the term cracker.

Wrong. The term "cracker" meant cracker of the whip or whipcracracker, if you will. Born and raised in the deep South, rest assured it is nothing like the n word. People in the deep South know this. And it damn sure doesn't mean "white slave".
edit on 30-4-2016 by JimiBlack because: (no reason given)




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