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Norwegian Government Gives Permission To Poison The Sea

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posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 05:01 AM
link   
www.theguardian.com...

Controversially, over the anticipated 50-year life of the mine, the company plans to dump millions of tonnes of waste from its operations into the adjacent Førde Fjord, one of the country’s most important spawning grounds for cod and salmon and a site where whales and porpoises congregate.

The Norwegian Fishermen’s Association criticised what it called a “political decision” to approve the mine, citing fears that heavy metals such as cadmium could be released into the fjord and damage fish stocks.

Marine biologists have warned that very fine waste particles could spread far from the fjord, polluting the food chain and harming its ecosystem.




www.theecologist.org...

The two projects currently under consideration are a rutile ore mine in the Førdefjorden in Sogn og Fjordane, and a copper ore mine in the Repparfjord in Finnmark. Both are on the verge of being granted government approval.

In Førdefjorden, on the west coast, Nordic Mining is planning to open a rutile ore mine from the Engebø Mountain, and dump the tailings in the fjord. The sheer scale of waste is staggering - over 250 million tonnes of waste will be deposited at the bottom of the fjord, right in the middle of a spawning area for several fish species in what is called 'the cleanest fjord on the west coast'.

In Repparfjord, situated far north in Finnmark, Nussir ASA is planning a copper ore mine, where the tailings will be dumped, as in Førdefjorden, in a spawning area for wild salmon, blue ling and the endangered coastal cod, and a site where whales and porpoises gather.

The volume of the tailings is smaller than in Førdefjorden, but the tailings here will contain dangerous levels of heavy metals. Several marine researchers classify the waste as "acutely toxic" for organisms living in the fjord.






savethefjords.com...



We're going to have to learn to live with less metal and oil. Extracting either leads to depletion of food stocks.

As it is we have the luxury to drive up a mountain and unload an entire band. True luxury.

To safeguard our food stocks we have to walk up the mountains. We've had it easy and it's time to call a halt to it.

Reduce consumption and Save the Fjords.



I think we can assume the mining companies will lie about pretty much everything.
www.niva.no...$FILE/key_note_paper_3_jan_helge_fossaa.pdf


Particles and contaminants spread to an area 5 times larger then planned

edit on 29 4 2016 by Kester because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 05:16 AM
link   

originally posted by: Kester
www.theguardian.com...

Controversially, over the anticipated 50-year life of the mine, the company plans to dump millions of tonnes of waste from its operations into the adjacent Førde Fjord, one of the country’s most important spawning grounds for cod and salmon and a site where whales and porpoises congregate.

The Norwegian Fishermen’s Association criticised what it called a “political decision” to approve the mine, citing fears that heavy metals such as cadmium could be released into the fjord and damage fish stocks.

Marine biologists have warned that very fine waste particles could spread far from the fjord, polluting the food chain and harming its ecosystem.




www.theecologist.org...

The two projects currently under consideration are a rutile ore mine in the Førdefjorden in Sogn og Fjordane, and a copper ore mine in the Repparfjord in Finnmark. Both are on the verge of being granted government approval.

In Førdefjorden, on the west coast, Nordic Mining is planning to open a rutile ore mine from the Engebø Mountain, and dump the tailings in the fjord. The sheer scale of waste is staggering - over 250 million tonnes of waste will be deposited at the bottom of the fjord, right in the middle of a spawning area for several fish species in what is called 'the cleanest fjord on the west coast'.

In Repparfjord, situated far north in Finnmark, Nussir ASA is planning a copper ore mine, where the tailings will be dumped, as in Førdefjorden, in a spawning area for wild salmon, blue ling and the endangered coastal cod, and a site where whales and porpoises gather.

The volume of the tailings is smaller than in Førdefjorden, but the tailings here will contain dangerous levels of heavy metals. Several marine researchers classify the waste as "acutely toxic" for organisms living in the fjord.






savethefjords.com...



We're going to have to learn to live with less metal and oil. Extracting either leads to depletion of food stocks.

As it is we have the luxury to drive up a mountain and unload an entire band. True luxury.

To safeguard our food stocks we have to walk up the mountains. We've had it easy and it's time to call a halt to it.

Reduce consumption and Save the Fjords.



I think we can assume the mining companies will lie about pretty much everything.
www.niva.no...$FILE/key_note_paper_3_jan_helge_fossaa.pdf


Particles and contaminants spread to an area 5 times larger then planned



The human mind is being contaminated, it is lost in its own stupidity these days.



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 07:01 AM
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Up in the Copper country they had copper mines and dumped the tailings in the lake over the last century. Although there are high levels of copper still in the tailings, the impact on overall fishing wasn't too bad. Most of the tumors in the fish are near the sewage treatment plants. But it seems they blame it on the tailings.

They abandoned the superfund, it was too extensive of damage, they could not fix it much. It should have never been dumped into the takes. But they were unaware back then, that was over fifty plus years ago. To do it now is a crime against nature because we are aware of what it does.

Would the fishing be better in the copper country if there were never mines there? I do not know. I just know that we should quit dumping unnatural chemistry in to the sewers and poisoning the wildlife. Medicines and cleaning chemicals are the culprits. It seems that if it causes problems you can see or smell, they do something about it. They do not test for many things in the discharge since they cannot presently remove them. Not putting them there in the first place should be focused on.

We have pretty strict environmental laws here, but local communities want to ignore the concerns to boost the economic impact from the businesses. If we all played by the same rules it would level the playing field. Take care of the planet we live on.

God is not going to be hauling us to heaven to trash his domain and is not going to fix what we are destroying. Why would he, we allowed the destruction. Believing that he is going to return this to paradise is something big business created. It may happen after we all die off, but we are very destructive and can turn this place into hell. Heaven is the place of all in abundance, it would be heaven here if we were to take care of the place and control population growth. Do not want more than you need.



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 08:16 AM
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a reply to: Kester


The volume of the tailings is smaller than in Førdefjorden, but the tailings here will contain dangerous levels of heavy metals. Several marine researchers classify the waste as "acutely toxic" for organisms living in the fjord.

Absolutely. Not only but if they use leach pits to separate the mineral from the ore, there will be other toxic compounds like cyanide in tailings ponds where birds land, drink and die.

Then the mine tunnels (which are underground channels where water flows naturally) will leak out forevermore the minerals they used to trap, adding to the waste stream in the local rivers. The ore veins in the rock trapped minerals before, now 'opened up' due to mining the vein, the minerals just pass through during rains, becoming ever more eroded, even if 'filled' and entrances blocked.

Ore deposits usually have minerals in combination, so the tailings piles will have other toxic heavy metals still in them, now dragged out of the mountain and piled up in the open, exposed to the elements and subject to erosion, also slowly leaching their poison down stream.

But hey, copper is 2.28 cents a pound… to maximize profits out the back end, the cheapest form of processing will be undertaken, meaning the waste will be unceremoniously dumped to cut cost. Usually during inclement weather, when the streams swell with run off from heavy rains. Thats when to sample the waste stream and catch them.



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 08:25 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse


]Although there are high levels of copper still in the tailings, the impact on overall fishing wasn't too bad. Most of the tumors in the fish are near the sewage treatment plants. But it seems they blame it on the tailings.

Because tailings still contain all the other mineral ores that weren't processed. Ore deposits usually contain a variety of minerals. They usually are in the form of an oxide, which dissolves in water. Some of these are only trace amounts but also highly toxic to biological life. They become discard because they weren't present in sufficient quantity to justify the cost of processing them.

When they tell you its the tailings and theres 'high copper content', they aren't telling you about the other toxic heavy metals also present. The people dong the dumping know exactly whats present and what levels. They're in the mining industry, its their business to know, exactly.



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 10:21 AM
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If I were the US, I would threaten war in order to stop this...



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 11:23 PM
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Ah, ancient people destroyed mankind in the name of prophets. Modern man destroys himself in the name of profits.

And I thought the Norwegians were far better than this. I will have to yell at my best friend



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