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Hey guys, we are getting too many earthquakes here (japan) need some help

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posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 02:45 AM
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a reply to: Phage
I didn't mean the good stuff. The cheap stuff will do.




posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 02:48 AM
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a reply to: OneGoal

Just tried to access USGS earthquake map and list; i'm getting error messages.

Anyone else having issues with usgs webpage?



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 02:50 AM
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The bad news is you are in japans south..so earthquakes are a unfortunate fact of life there. On the plus side, you are in Japan..you wont need to worry too much about things like water, necessities, going without for long given they have a pretty good reaction time to emergency situations / earthquakes.
I wouldnt worry about coming up with some survivalist plan for any major length fo time. a couple days should be fine. its more a concern about what is happening right as things shake. Just get outside if possible as quickly as possible I think if thats an option when things start shaking



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 02:51 AM
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a reply to: musicismagic

Get some Potassium Iodide pills too, just in case another Fukushima type event happens and your means of transportation have been disabled.



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 02:51 AM
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a reply to: OneGoal

No (it works fine here) this is what is on there about Japan but I have no clue


4.8 (10km) ESE of Shimabara, Japan
2016-04-28 06:30:52 UTC10



edit on 28-4-2016 by realnewsrealfunny because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 02:57 AM
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a reply to: realnewsrealfunny

Ok good news about the usgs Web page.

Hopefully this is the strongest aftershock we'll see. Aftershocks on strong subduction plates can occur weeks after a major tectonic movement.

I too live in an earthquake prone area (west coast u.s.) and quite a few of my good friends are concerned we are getting close to a tectonic slip on this side of the great big blue.

Hoping everyone stays safe and well prepared.
edit on 28-4-2016 by OneGoal because: (no reason given)

edit on 28-4-2016 by OneGoal because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 03:04 AM
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a reply to: musicismagic

Don't forget a first aid kit and medicines.



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 03:20 AM
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originally posted by: Skid Mark
a reply to: musicismagic
Alcohol would be another. Whiskey. Not only could it be a disinfectant but also it's good for bartering.


Seriously, we must come from the same backwoods back home.



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 04:18 AM
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You likely wont like my answer, and it wont be able to fit in your car.

Time to move to a mainland.



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 04:37 AM
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warm clothes were mentioned, but i'll say it again: warm clothes. actually, everything from underwear to shoes. the last thing you want is get all wet and frozen because of rain/whatever, and catch a cold or worse.

and when we're at it, some basic medical supplies.

stay safe and keep us posted.



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 04:39 AM
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Baby wipes-for cleaning
Life straw or water purification tablets-If money is tight go with the tablets, or even iodine
Tarp- can be used to catch water, or be a temporary shelter or to keep your stuff dry
Dehydrated camp food, or rice and homemade jerky
You said you were older I would look into as good a medical bag as you can afford.
Boots... good hiking boots
Change of clothes, this goes right along with the baby wipes... if your hygiene isn't good you risk health problems.
Hatchet, and a good sharp knife
You might want to grab a book on setting snares, might never need it... but if your running low on meat could save your life.
Something for self defense, I wont make any suggestions because you know what is legal and what you would be most comfortable with.

thats a decent start, I am sure more will be along to add to the list.

Stay safe and best of luck... I hope and pray the ring of fire calms down.



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 05:09 AM
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originally posted by: smirkley
You likely wont like my answer, and it wont be able to fit in your car.

Time to move to a mainland.


Unfortunately I'm been here so many years that we may find it actually hard to do, but thanks for your reply.



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 05:13 AM
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a reply to: musicismagic

I mentioned this is in another thread, but this seems like a good opportunity to share my thoughts on this again...

Whenever I see an EQ video I see the same thing again and again, people stopping, people waiting, people not getting out of the structure they're in until seconds after it starts. People seem to want to wait and see if it's going to be just a little one or a major quake, and this is a potentially fatal decision to make.

I truly believe that most of those harmed in these events are those people who suddenly stop, waiting to see if it's going to be big or not. By the time they find out that it IS a big one they've lost vital seconds in which they could have gotten out.

I would say that the whole notion of bartering, having heavy bottles of alcohol for that etc is a nonsense. Remember that these things are being suggested by people who don't live in Japan, they don't have a full grasp of what Japanese culture is like. You won't likely face the same civil problems they might experience in the US. When people talk about having things to barter they are imagining what they would need in LA, and Japanese culture is ENTIRELY different. For instance, you do not have thousands of people roaming around with guns ready to snatch what they need from others in the same way you would have in the US.

You don't need to worry too much about protection from others, or bartering for things, your society is far more stable and your people are far more willing to help each other and maintain control and dignity during chaos.

As for supplies and prep I think you should have a tent and two backpacks in the boot of your car, or anywhere away from any structure. You shouldn't need to go back into your home for anything. After the last one I watched a video by a young man who ran out of his house to join his neighbours in the street and none of them had anything with them other than their phones and laptops, and I'm sorry but you can't sleep under a laptop and you can't eat a phone.

Being in Japan you have a lot of systems in place to meet the needs of people seeking shelter, and you don't have the same risks of social collapse we would see in other places, but I would still make sure I had enough food for a week, and perhaps one of those purification bottles. You could then use any river or stream to drink from.

You should perhaps team up with your neighbours to form a collective plan. As long as you are all on the same page about leaving the second you feel it, and having your supplies outside somewhere, you can then divide your needs amongst yourselves so that you all have a collective supply which will be larger and more able to support you all.

I would then also look at the best location to wait it out. If there's a large enough park able to accommodate a few thousand people anywhere near you I would choose that, it's where people would meet and it's where any assistance would likely be provided by the authorities. That would also be more helpful if the area were to be cut off and isolated by road etc. Flights over it would show that there are thousands of people there and you would then be prioritized more quickly than if you were all scattered around the city.

I truly believe that the biggest issue is people not paying attention and getting out the second they feel it. Injuries and deaths in EQ's are caused by collapse of buildings, it makes absolutely no sense for anyone to feel it happening and just stand there waiting to see if it's going to be a big one.

I'm sure you will be fine, but preparation is key.



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 05:51 AM
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a reply to: musicismagic

Some anti-diarrhea medication would be good to have. Bacteria from bad water is common after natural disasters, others have mentioned water purification methods which would prevent the need for this but it would be good to have just in case. It is low cost, light weight and would not take much space in your backpack. If it turns out that you don't need it you might be able to help someone else out. Diarrhea is not a dignified way to die.



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 06:18 AM
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Forgot to add... having it ready in your car is a great start... might also want to look at good quality back packs, if a mud slide takes out the road you could be forced to leave a lot behind.

So having 2 packed backpacks will at least allow you to take some of it with you, this is another thing I would go as good as you can afford.

A properly fitted back pack is wonderful, I am in my mid 40's with a herniated disk but I can still carry 50+ lbs about 10k before needing a serious break, and rain gear... hypothermia can slip up on you quick if your distracted by things like bugging out. (ex. I ran a tough mudder 12 mile obstacle course run in souther germany last summer...prepped for it like I did when I ran them in the states, forgot about the colder temps... by the time I finished the course I was in the early stages of hypothermia. Learned my lesson)

If you want to prepare, the next thing once your medical/shelter/food/security is looked at, you need to look at you and your missus physical condition, everything I listed wont mean squat if you don't have the physical ability to deal with the stresses of a bug out.

You don't have to be a navy seal, but something as simple as walking a couple miles in the evening can make a pretty big difference in your over all health.

If you already have these things in mind I apologize, just wanted to be as thorough as I can be.



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 06:25 AM
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In case of an earthquake, I would really love to have this:

youtu.be...

Sorry on phone at the moment. Cant get the youtube video properly linked.



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 06:44 AM
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Keep in mind you will need at least a 1/2 gallon of water per person per day. You need to look at where you are going to go incase of an emergency. Ask yourself, is there a water supply there? If not, you have to carry it all yourself. 3-5 days without water, you're dead.



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 06:54 AM
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a reply to: musicismagic

I hope that it will not come that far , but If you've got the time to watch some handy survival techniques that I suggest to watch bushcraft on fire or listen or watch all things survival here on ATS



Be Save and take good care over there..



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 07:05 AM
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a reply to: asen_y2k

When did Q made this thing ? It's not only handy for Earth quakes if you want to invite some bad guys to a party and they are going to bed , just press the button. .



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 07:44 AM
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a reply to: musicismagic

Nobody mentions it, they always talk about supplies and stuff but the best investment you can make in a SHTF scenario is a good pair of hiking/mountaineering boots and clothes that are both comfortable, durable and waterproof, preferably Gortex because chances are if you're in need of a survival kit, then you won't be doing much driving and will have to do everything on foot
edit on 28/4/16 by Discotech because: (no reason given)



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