It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

revisiting CNC

page: 1
3
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 05:36 PM
link   
OK so I'm looking at different schools right now and it looks like most programmer schools are six month courses for a certificate and schools for machining are 1 year.

I'm wondering is that going to be enough?

Also it looks like on the surface from job searches the actual machinist is in higher demand but what's the better overall career path and if I want to run my own machine shop which direction should I go first?

Thanks




posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 05:40 PM
link   
I clicked on this thinking it would be about the music factory.

My thoughts are that trades are easier to find employment in than anything else. Unfortunately, I don't know enough about this line of work other then to say, "good luck and I wish you luck!".



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 05:42 PM
link   
a reply to: onequestion
Sub contracting in smallville is difficult these days. Mostly you need expensive machines that cost a ton of money, let alone all the exotic tooling these days, plus programming skills.

Got Math?



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 06:04 PM
link   
at reply to: intrptr

So definitely go the programming route.

Can you reccomend what codes are best for higher end finer work?

My goal is 5 axis but I'm just starting to learn

Oh I'm willing to move after I get experience to Texas or California where aerospace is

But what I plan on doing is medical equipment I'm in an area heavily invested in medical research
edit on 4/26/2016 by onequestion because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 06:09 PM
link   
Oh I just found a post by cranial sponge that answered all my questions



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 06:16 PM
link   
I've been running 3 CNC machines in a granite shop for over a year now. I have zero training other than what I've learned at the shop. I know a bit of g code but all of the programming is done with CAM software so we never do any manual programming. A lot of it is actually fairly straightforward and fairly simple to learn if you're kind of handy with mechanical stuff.

If you can manage to get a job in a machine shop that's willing to train you that might be a good option.

Eta:also in our shop there's no programming guy and machine guy. I program and run the machines.
edit on 26/4/2016 by dug88 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 06:22 PM
link   
a reply to: dug88

Oh awesome.

So if take the six month training course that'll get my foot into a shop should I maybe get a job as a machinist first and just involve myself in the programming process when possible until I learn the machine?

I can read a book and learn gcode easily I'm tech savvy and know python and have been scripting since I was kid I have a knack for that sorta thing but it's a hobby nor a cqreer
edit on 4/26/2016 by onequestion because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 06:27 PM
link   
a reply to: onequestion

Here's a free course you can try out. Udemy CNC G Code



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 06:33 PM
link   
a reply to: Atsbhct

Nice thanks



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 06:42 PM
link   

originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: dug88

Oh awesome.

So if take the six month training course that'll get my foot into a shop should I maybe get a job as a machinist first and just involve myself in the programming process when possible until I learn the machine?

I can read a book and learn gcode easily I'm tech savvy and know python and have been scripting since I was kid I have a knack for that sorta thing but it's a hobby nor a cqreer


That sounds like a reasonable idea. Personally, if I were you, I'd start applying at whatever machine shops are around your area. Let them know you're interested in making it a career, even let them know about your plan to go to school for it. With any luck you might be able to get a job in a shop. Even if its not on the machines right away, just being therr and showing enthusiasm and all that is usually a good way to move up to what you actually want to do. And in the end, you may be able to avoid school altogether. I've always personally found I learn more by doing things and getting practice on it then I ever did just listening to someone talk about it.

The computer skills definitely help and if you know a scripting language already gcode is pretty dead easy. Its mostly just memorizing what the different G codes stand for

If you haven't alrrady you could also familiarize yourself with CAM software. Most cnc machines in use are usually programmed with some kind of software package like that rather than manually. They let you configure toolpaths and set up geometries visually instead of trying to do everything manually.

We use AlphaCam in our shop. With that you can take a CAD drawing and have the machine programmed and ready to run in about 15-30 minutes depending on how complicated the setup is.



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 06:49 PM
link   
a reply to: dug88

What use would I be in your shop with the programming certificate but no machining experience?

I think I'm going to do what you suggest and take the classes anyway that way I have a better range of options



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 07:04 PM
link   

originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: dug88

What use would I be in your shop with the programming certificate but no machining experience?



It's how most people started, even without a certificate. My partner is an electrician who is contracted out of a machining shop. When the shop bought a CNC machine, the CNC company offered a weekend course to all of the relevant employees. The employer absorbed the airfare and hotel costs.

So for the cost of one persons half tuition, now the shop owner has 5 or 6 employees who are comfortable using the CNC machine. When they run into trouble, they can always call tech support.



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 07:18 PM
link   
a reply to: Atsbhct

Hmm it seems as if the machining knowledge is more valueable



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 07:34 PM
link   
a reply to: onequestion

What inspired you to become a machinist if you don't mind sharing?



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 07:34 PM
link   
Machining is all a question of "speeds and feeds" I was taught 35 years ago.

Too fast will burn or break the tool and leave a bad surface finish.

Too slow and the machine will not make money.

All of this was worked out before CNC and is in the "Machinery Handbook" for a ballpark place to start.

Getting it from the screen to mass production is the "magic" part.

Good to see you're looking at the medical field. You are in the perfect place it seems.

Best wishes..



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 07:42 PM
link   

originally posted by: onequestion
OK so I'm looking at different schools right now and it looks like most programmer schools are six month courses for a certificate and schools for machining are 1 year.

I'm wondering is that going to be enough?

Also it looks like on the surface from job searches the actual machinist is in higher demand but what's the better overall career path and if I want to run my own machine shop which direction should I go first?

Thanks


If your looking to run your own machine shop you should probably work toward a mechanical engineering degree. It makes sense to start with machine programming and machining as far as a direct job for the money spent.

My dad has his own machine shop for his own products. He does all the programming, machining, soldering, etc. He has a ba in ME and an MA in bussiness. He did a lot of night school and worked in the field during the day. If you have an interest in the physical aspect of machine work it will make you a much better engineer. Much more useful for solving problems in the real machining world rather than just a designer.
Just my two.

I make guitars and have worked c n c in a factory setting in the past. (It can really suck)

I am about to buy a table top c n c for my own business.
edit on 26-4-2016 by luthier because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 08:03 PM
link   

originally posted by: Atsbhct

originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: dug88

What use would I be in your shop with the programming certificate but no machining experience?



So for the cost of one persons half tuition, now the shop owner has 5 or 6 employees who are comfortable using the CNC machine. When they run into trouble, they can always call tech support.


That's how our shop is set up. One of the guys travelled to Minnesota to train for a week with the manufacturer of the machines and he's the one who trained me and the other two CNC guys.


originally posted by: draoicht
Machining is all a question of "speeds and feeds" I was taught 35 years ago.

Too fast will burn or break the tool and leave a bad surface finish.

Too slow and the machine will not make money.


Also, this. All of the actual maching is sitting in front of a terminal raising and lowering the feedrate to keep the horsepower and axis load below a certain level, depending on the tool, until it starts on the tools that stay low enough you can leave it alone. Most of the actual work involves loading and unloading the machines. Granted, I work with granite so everything's super heavy. But, I imagine metal, glass or wood machines are fairly labour intensive to load and unload. Plastic might be a bit better...??
edit on 26/4/2016 by dug88 because: (no reason given)

edit on 26/4/2016 by dug88 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 08:13 PM
link   

originally posted by: dug88

originally posted by: Atsbhct

originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: dug88

What use would I be in your shop with the programming certificate but no machining experience?



So for the cost of one persons half tuition, now the shop owner has 5 or 6 employees who are comfortable using the CNC machine. When they run into trouble, they can always call tech support.


That's how our shop is set up. One of the guys travelled to Minnesota to train for a week with the manufacturer of the machines and he's the one who trained me and the other two CNC guys.



It depends on what the product is. For me I ran a three axis fidol. I didn't need any experience. I learned on the job. Also granite is not a complex situation. Your template guy probably goes out with his lap top and the template is directly uploaded to your cnc..and your basically babby sitting machines that do 90 percent of the work on their own.

If it's medical research or aerospace even making templates can involve cam and programming. The production guys have to follow strict tolerances and machinists are the guys they hire for many of the jobs. They can tell when the tolerances are off and how to fix the problem. It all depends what you want to do. You can learn machining on the job as well. To me it sounds like the OP wants an engineering degree eventually. If you want to run your own shop a mechanical engineering degree will give you programming, electric engineering, physics, etc. All very useful for solving problems.



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 09:40 PM
link   

originally posted by: luthier

originally posted by: dug88

originally posted by: Atsbhct

originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: dug88

What use would I be in your shop with the programming certificate but no machining experience?



So for the cost of one persons half tuition, now the shop owner has 5 or 6 employees who are comfortable using the CNC machine. When they run into trouble, they can always call tech support.


That's how our shop is set up. One of the guys travelled to Minnesota to train for a week with the manufacturer of the machines and he's the one who trained me and the other two CNC guys.



It depends on what the product is. For me I ran a three axis fidol. I didn't need any experience. I learned on the job. Also granite is not a complex situation. Your template guy probably goes out with his lap top and the template is directly uploaded to your cnc..and your basically babby sitting machines that do 90 percent of the work on their own.

If it's medical research or aerospace even making templates can involve cam and programming. The production guys have to follow strict tolerances and machinists are the guys they hire for many of the jobs. They can tell when the tolerances are off and how to fix the problem. It all depends what you want to do. You can learn machining on the job as well. To me it sounds like the OP wants an engineering degree eventually. If you want to run your own shop a mechanical engineering degree will give you programming, electric engineering, physics, etc. All very useful for solving problems.



Sort of. We do have a template machine. It doesn't produce directly usable drawings. They still need to be bpoly'd, offset properly abd finished in cad. We take those touched up drawings and import them first for the waterjet to cut. That machine requires almost no watching. After that we program the milling machines and polish the outsides. Those machines have to be watched all the way through. The pressure can get high enough to break the pieces or the tools. We've had a couple of tools explode...

We also have to do all the maintenance on the machines and fix things that break and they do...especially at the end of the day on the last piece being run.



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 10:09 PM
link   

originally posted by: dug88

originally posted by: luthier

originally posted by: dug88

originally posted by: Atsbhct

originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: dug88

What use would I be in your shop with the programming certificate but no machining experience?



So for the cost of one persons half tuition, now the shop owner has 5 or 6 employees who are comfortable using the CNC machine. When they run into trouble, they can always call tech support.


That's how our shop is set up. One of the guys travelled to Minnesota to train for a week with the manufacturer of the machines and he's the one who trained me and the other two CNC guys.



It depends on what the product is. For me I ran a three axis fidol. I didn't need any experience. I learned on the job. Also granite is not a complex situation. Your template guy probably goes out with his lap top and the template is directly uploaded to your cnc..and your basically babby sitting machines that do 90 percent of the work on their own.

If it's medical research or aerospace even making templates can involve cam and programming. The production guys have to follow strict tolerances and machinists are the guys they hire for many of the jobs. They can tell when the tolerances are off and how to fix the problem. It all depends what you want to do. You can learn machining on the job as well. To me it sounds like the OP wants an engineering degree eventually. If you want to run your own shop a mechanical engineering degree will give you programming, electric engineering, physics, etc. All very useful for solving problems.



Sort of. We do have a template machine. It doesn't produce directly usable drawings. They still need to be bpoly'd, offset properly abd finished in cad. We take those touched up drawings and import them first for the waterjet to cut. That machine requires almost no watching. After that we program the milling machines and polish the outsides. Those machines have to be watched all the way through. The pressure can get high enough to break the pieces or the tools. We've had a couple of tools explode...

We also have to do all the maintenance on the machines and fix things that break and they do...especially at the end of the day on the last piece being run.


The material and machines know when it's the end of the day.


Wood is like granite in that every piece is different. The thing I hated to run most was bone for bridges. They didn't take very long and 1/4of them explode in the vice. It made me feel like a robot. Hated that day of the week. The last thing I would run were the neck blanks for guitars. They took a long time. If they f'up because of the vacuum, bits, or material the whole down range line was screwed for work. Of coarse that usually happens in the last operation.



new topics

top topics



 
3
<<   2 >>

log in

join