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Thoughts/Theories On Ancient Civilizations Contacting Each Other During The Pangaea?

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posted on Apr, 23 2016 @ 07:14 PM
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originally posted by: the2ofusr1
a reply to: MadhatterTheGreat

If you are not married to the millions and billions of years time frames and are willing to consider another aproach to the subject then this vid might be helpful .


The amount of heat and deformation caused by rapid movements like that would have multiple effects:
* throw the Earth off orbit
* drastically change the length of day (this happens with large earthquakes... and the idea of the continents moving that fast would generate earthquakes beyond our worst metric.)
* shatter all the rocks (so there'd be no layers
* melt the rocks (the friction of the plates rubbing against each other would turn it all to lava.)


In the end, he's trying to justify something and the geology simply doesn't work like that.




posted on Apr, 23 2016 @ 07:54 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

He did mention at the beginning that there were other PHD's that worked on the model .Models are just that and can have un-foreseen metrics not added and so could be way off the mark .Even models built today use a metric built on the known knowns and so hind casting the past could be off the mark as well .We see that in the climate models produced .They diverge from the observations weather in the past or today's observations . That is why they have been adjusting the data and using little tricks here and there to make the models better represent the observations .

Its hard to put it all under one roof and come up with a definitive answer . I am not a young earth creationist but I am not a millions and billions years evolutionist either . I didn't prescribe to pangea until I seen the expanding earth theory but have dropped that for the plate tectonics theory . how and when that happened works on for me .weather short or longer time frames . Austins work on Mount Saint Helens with the multipal layers in a short time frame could work in some other places too but possibly 1000's of years ....its all good .



posted on Apr, 23 2016 @ 08:22 PM
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originally posted by: the2ofusr1
a reply to: Phage

Yes I know it was ash . Now to turn as into rock you need some water and some other stuff as well as time . Mount saint helens are layered and there was no flood there . When the Ice age started melting it may have released a lot of water at times and that could have mixed a lot of stuff and when given enough time ,would have created stone . No need for millions of years but there is a need for a lot of material moving and mixing . some with fossils in them . For me it has explains to my mind my world view . The picture fits .


You may not be familiar with the different types of stone

There's igneous rock like lava. Volcanic stone can cool within a matter of decades
There's sedimentary rock like Limestone, that is made in one of two ways. The first way is that it's made from coral reefs. Coral grows very slowly (it's a layer of living plants on top of a layer of deceased plants. You can't grow a "block" of coral at a single time. You can see the coral for yourself by looking at the limestone
The second way is to put down layers of diatoms (things too small too see) and heat and pressure eventually turn that to limestone.
The third type of rock is metamorphic. A sedimentary rock is created and heat and pressure change it to something else (Marble is a good example of this.)

When you look at geologic cross sections of the Earth, it becomes pretty clear that they were not put down like the ingredients of a sandwich... one layer after another and then done.



posted on Apr, 23 2016 @ 08:25 PM
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originally posted by: the2ofusr1
a reply to: Byrd

He did mention at the beginning that there were other PHD's that worked on the model .


That's actually not this significant.

I have a PhD in Information Science (as many here can tell you, because I did whine about some of the classes over the past 6 years.) And while I have degrees in Biology, English, Anthropology, and Computer Science, if I start spouting off about Lie Algebras and higher math, you should take it with a huge grain of salt.

So one has to ask "which PhDs? "

And if you look at cave formation and things that have flowstone dripped over them, the number of layers in the flowstone is another argument for a very old age.




 
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