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Can they keep a lid on this ? ( Radioactives Selling )

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posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 09:04 AM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014

originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: 3danimator2014

originally posted by: intrptr

People don't have a clue what they're discussing when it comes to radioactive contamination in the environment.



And you do? You posted images that have nothing whatsoever to do with depleted uranium.

Let me add, some are covering up the truth about Depleted Uranium used in warfare.


Right...so its a conspiracy, but you have no proof. OK


Like I said and you just agreed, you're job is to forever say, "there is no proof".

Here, disprove this… Uranium is radioactive .




posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 09:22 AM
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Well done, Uranium is radioactive. Its also very common in the ground. In fact, there is radiation all around you right now. Does that scare you?

My point is that you are arguing with horrible images of poor newborns and kids with horrible diseases or birth defects and attributing them all to radiation when i know some are not. In fact, none of them might be, i only recognise a few images. I haven't looked into them all.



posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 10:40 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

And the half life of natural uranium is how many billions of years again? Which means the radioactivity of uranium is incredibly small? Yes, yes it does.



posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 11:24 AM
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originally posted by: Bedlam
a reply to: intrptr

And the half life of natural uranium is how many billions of years again? Which means the radioactivity of uranium is incredibly small? Yes, yes it does.


Heck. You can actually buy tiny samples of U metal. I'm planning on buying one to add to my collection of elements I have at home. I just have to convince my wife that it's safe. People go gaga when they hear the word radioactivity.



posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 12:03 PM
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originally posted by: Bedlam
a reply to: intrptr

And the half life of natural uranium is how many billions of years again? Which means the radioactivity of uranium is incredibly small? Yes, yes it does.


More deflection. Thread isn't about "Natural" Uranium.

a reply to: 3danimator2014

You too. The thread isn't' about "Uranium in the ground".
edit on 19-4-2016 by intrptr because: added reply



posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 12:26 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: Bedlam
a reply to: intrptr

And the half life of natural uranium is how many billions of years again? Which means the radioactivity of uranium is incredibly small? Yes, yes it does.


More deflection. Thread isn't about "Natural" Uranium.

a reply to: 3danimator2014

You too. The thread isn't' about "Uranium in the ground".


But..Bedlam point still stands. Do you understand the relation of an elements/isotopes half life with regards to the intensity of its radiation?



posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 12:47 PM
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Must have been a big lump of U238 if they expected 200M . Not myself being an radiation expert if this U238 is so innocent as some are stating why is it added to N bombs to make the boom bigger ?



Most modern nuclear weapons utilize 238U as a "tamper" material (see nuclear weapon design). A tamper which surrounds a fissile core works to reflect neutrons and to add inertia to the compression of the Pu-239 charge. As such, it increases the efficiency of the weapon and reduces the critical mass required. In the case of a thermonuclear weapon 238U can be used to encase the fusion fuel, the high flux of very energetic neutrons from the resulting fusion reaction causes 238U nuclei to split and adds more energy to the "yield" of the weapon. Such weapons are referred to as fission-fusion-fission weapons after the three consecutive stages of the explosion. An example of such a weapon is Castle Bravo. The larger portion of the total explosive yield in this design comes from the final fission stage fueled by 238U, producing enormous amounts of radioactive fission products. For example, an estimated 77% of the 10.4-megaton yield of the Ivy Mike thermonuclear test in 1952 came from fast fission of the depleted uranium tamper. Because depleted uranium has no critical mass, it can be added to thermonuclear bombs in almost unlimited quantity. The Soviet Union's test of the "Tsar Bomba" in 1961 produced "only" 60 megatons of explosive power, over 90% of which came from fusion, because the 238U final stage had been replaced with lead. Had 238U been used instead, the yield of the "Tsar Bomba" could have been well-above 100 megatons, and it would have produced nuclear fallout equivalent to one third of the global total that had been produced up to that time.


en.wikipedia.org...


originally posted by: PeterMcFly
a reply to: skywatcher44

LOL... U-238 is simply depleted uranium (DU). You can't make a dirty bomb of it, or else the Amireagan will have to answer to their extensive use as penetrating bullet in place like Iraq.


And Please don't choke on your tea and biscuits while LOL ing Its not just simple DU, ( Which is not so simple anyways ) I just reported the Story from Yahoo as linked above as I thought it may merit some interesting discussion.. Peace..



posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 01:33 PM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014

originally posted by: Bedlam
a reply to: intrptr

And the half life of natural uranium is how many billions of years again? Which means the radioactivity of uranium is incredibly small? Yes, yes it does.


Heck. You can actually buy tiny samples of U metal. I'm planning on buying one to add to my collection of elements I have at home. I just have to convince my wife that it's safe. People go gaga when they hear the word radioactivity.



Some trinitite followed me home, got it in a glass plaque thing on the wall. Shh.



posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 01:34 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: Bedlam
a reply to: intrptr

And the half life of natural uranium is how many billions of years again? Which means the radioactivity of uranium is incredibly small? Yes, yes it does.


More deflection. Thread isn't about "Natural" Uranium.


Sure it is. The article is describing refined but not enriched uranium. And uranium isn't that radioactive. Hell, even straight U235 isn't that radioactive. Again...what's the half life? The longer the half life, the less the radiation.



posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 01:36 PM
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originally posted by: skywatcher44
Must have been a big lump of U238 if they expected 200M . Not myself being an radiation expert if this U238 is so innocent as some are stating why is it added to N bombs to make the boom bigger ?


Because it's fissionable without being fissile.

And it's useful for other functions in the weapon, like tamper, because it's very dense, and relatively easy to come by.

eta: Here's you a clue - the more radioactive the fissile, the #tier the nuke. You don't WANT radioactivity in your fissiles. It's why you can't make a gun type plutonium weapon.

edit on 19-4-2016 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 05:47 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

To add to what you said Bedlam, the amount of Pu needed to go critical and therefore boom depends a lot on the shape of the pit. Spherical being optimal of course which is why they use it, but by putting reflectors around it to reflect the neutrons back towards the pit, the size of the Pu sphere can be reduced by a lot. I'm not sure but I think they also use the U238 to give an extra neutron source at he detonation ..but i may be be wrong about that.



posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 05:50 PM
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And yet dirty bombs and nukes being set off by crazy dictators and terrorists haven't happened.

Someone's watching out for us (not aliens) ...


*shhh*



posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 05:54 PM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014
...but by putting reflectors around it to reflect the neutrons back towards the pit, the size of the Pu sphere can be reduced by a lot.


The reflector comes in as a fractional exponent in the denominator of the equation for critical mass. It's typically not as big an influence as density. But if you had a PERFECT reflector, it would drive the critical mass to near zero. Too bad there aren't any perfect reflectors. Or not, depending on your viewpoint, I suppose.



I'm not sure but I think they also use the U238 to give an extra neutron source at he detonation ..but i may be be wrong about that.


You use it for a lot of stuff, but not as a neutron source. Typically, you load a bunch of U238 around a weapon that has spare neutrons. It converts the neutron flux to thermal energy by fissioning. So it's the source of most of the 'bang' in fusion weapons. For pure fission weapons, it's sort of glue. It holds the bang together long enough to finish banging before it gets too spread out.





posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 05:55 PM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom
And yet dirty bombs and nukes being set off by crazy dictators and terrorists haven't happened.


Last one got too close, fell down went boom. Aw.



posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 06:08 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

It's got to be one enigmatic group that investigates and stops these things from happening. Those guys can't have much of a "real life" let alone a family.



posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 06:11 PM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom
a reply to: Bedlam

It's got to be one enigmatic group that investigates and stops these things from happening. Those guys can't have much of a "real life" let alone a family.


It's a jolly candy-like red button.

Well, there are a lot of people behind it. But it boils down to a jolly, happy, shiny red candy-like button.




posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 09:13 PM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: 3danimator2014
...but by putting reflectors around it to reflect the neutrons back towards the pit, the size of the Pu sphere can be reduced by a lot.


The reflector comes in as a fractional exponent in the denominator of the equation for critical mass. It's typically not as big an influence as density. But if you had a PERFECT reflector, it would drive the critical mass to near zero. Too bad there aren't any perfect reflectors. Or not, depending on your viewpoint, I suppose.



I'm not sure but I think they also use the U238 to give an extra neutron source at he detonation ..but i may be be wrong about that.


You use it for a lot of stuff, but not as a neutron source. Typically, you load a bunch of U238 around a weapon that has spare neutrons. It converts the neutron flux to thermal energy by fissioning. So it's the source of most of the 'bang' in fusion weapons. For pure fission weapons, it's sort of glue. It holds the bang together long enough to finish banging before it gets too spread out.




Really? I'm sure I remember reading that the reflector around the pit will affect the critical mass my a substancial amount...damn, I wish I could remember which website I read that on...ill get back to you. I'm sure you are right though. You know more about these things than most people here on ATS. Haha



posted on Apr, 19 2016 @ 10:09 PM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014

Really? I'm sure I remember reading that the reflector around the pit will affect the critical mass my a substancial amount...


It can, if it's a really GOOD reflector, but the thing comes in as an exponent on a term in the denominator, and it's got some other term diddling it. I remember it can cause a zero in your criticality map - if the reflectivity goes to 100%, then your mass closely approximates to zero.

The current best reflectors, IIRC, reduce the mass somewhere by 35-45%.
edit on 19-4-2016 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2016 @ 07:27 AM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014

originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: Bedlam
a reply to: intrptr

And the half life of natural uranium is how many billions of years again? Which means the radioactivity of uranium is incredibly small? Yes, yes it does.


More deflection. Thread isn't about "Natural" Uranium.

a reply to: 3danimator2014

You too. The thread isn't' about "Uranium in the ground".


But..Bedlam point still stands. Do you understand the relation of an elements/isotopes half life with regards to the intensity of its radiation?

More important than half life is the type of emitter, (alpha beta gamma) and whether the nuclide or isotope is internal or external to the body. The hugest distinction is naturally occurring background vs. radioactive contamination in the environment and in us.

All of which you deflect on que whenever I try to explain it. Since I know the difference and I'm not a physicist you are either ignorant or a disinformation specialist.



posted on Apr, 20 2016 @ 07:39 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam


Sure it is. The article is describing refined but not enriched uranium.

"Refined" isn't "Natural", nice try.


And uranium isn't that radioactive. Hell, even straight U235 isn't that radioactive.

Source Internal or external to the human body?


Again…what's the half life? The longer the half life, the less the radiation.

Half life of elements is immaterial when it comes to ingesting them.



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