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Russian Engineer Reveals Evidence for Advanced Ancient Civilisation

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posted on May, 5 2016 @ 12:52 AM
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a reply to: Journey1986

I mean, the Collesium and the Parthenon are pretty well known examples, both incredible feats of engineering and architecture.
This link is a general overview of Roman architecture:
www.ancient.eu...


This one goes into much more detail:
link

To get to more recent, simply look up Gothic Cathedrals. They were made with out the benefit of modern tools, and are really fantastic works.



edit on 5-5-2016 by RuneSpider because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 5 2016 @ 12:54 AM
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a reply to: Journey1986

Also, to your artist point, no one is saying they made the lines unguided. There are a number of simple tools used up to WWII before the onset of high industrial tools to make straight lines.
Which is, I think, fairly obvious anywhere in Europe.



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 01:02 AM
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originally posted by: RuneSpider
a reply to: Byrd

And somehow when the Romans or Greeks did it, no aliens or advanced technology was needed.

I have to guess people think the Egyptians simply popped up out of no where, when in actuality they developed over time in the region.
Stone working was done thousands of years before the Egyptians laid the first stone of the pyramids.


Stonework wasn't that common, and therefore reserved mostly for things that belonged to gods. In Egypt, the changeover occurs around 3000 bc with the rock cut tombs of the nobles (which have all sorts of detailing and sharp angles and well-smoothed walls. By the time Khufu rolled around they'd been working in stone (statues and coffins for over 600 yars.



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 05:49 AM
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as far as perfection- absolutely. it's one of the glaring examples. these guys act like "oh I'll just pick up this 800+ ton rough cut stone and rub it smooth on all sides with "rubbing stones"." like they're playing with themselves.... which they actually are when they think we're buying their lame theories.

the symmetries are one of the most obvious reasons we know this wasn't done with primitive hand tools. these guys show examples of these crude tools with a little broken shard tied at the end and they just assume every little shard has the exact same tolerances as the last one as if there is some primitive tool 3d printer.


a reply to: Snarl



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 07:16 AM
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a reply to: bottleslingguy

It may be worth considering that humans today are much less strong than those of even 500 years ago. This is often over looked when working out what humans could and couldn't do. There is pretty numerous research demonstrating this - have a look for yourself.

I realise that takes a bit of getting your head around but it is true - and therefore impacts on what could be lifted, how things could be shaped, etc, etc.

Quite simply, as life has got easier we as a species have got weaker - a clear example of social evolution impacting human evolution.

As an aside, other research also indicates our intelligence has shrunk - reliance on machinery to think for us has impacted our cognitive functions.



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 07:43 AM
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originally posted by: bottleslingguy
as far as perfection- absolutely. it's one of the glaring examples. these guys act like "oh I'll just pick up this 800+ ton rough cut stone and rub it smooth on all sides with "rubbing stones".l[/post]



Have you looked at the First Dynasty tools they had? We still use some of them today.

For anyone interested, here's what they had (including flint that was used regularly up until the 18th dynasty... as everyone here knows, I'm sure, a flint edge is far sharper and more durable than a lot of metal knife edges) (Reshfam saves y
u hunting through museums but museum links are there)


Squares, plumbs, and levels shown here

Stone vessels including tomb reliefs of the overseer showing them at work are here



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 07:44 AM
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originally posted by: Flavian
a reply to: bottleslingguy

It may be worth considering that humans today are much less strong than those of even 500 years ago. This is often over looked when working out what humans could and couldn't do. There is pretty numerous research demonstrating this - have a look for yourself.


Simply because our lives don't call for hauling cattle and other things around. Of course, we're not being injured and disabled from the work that they did. In general, we're taller and have the potential to be much stronger.



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 08:12 AM
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a reply to: Byrd

I suspect it may be linked in to tolerance levels more than anything, to be honest. Most humans today use a minimal amount of their overall strength and tolerance, mainly because we do not have to use it these days!

This is something that, for example, Special Forces teach. When we reach "the wall", we are operating at something like around 40% of out total power - they teach to "push through" and then see the results.

The harshness of life back then also played a huge role. As you identified, hauling cattle is not an easy thing to do! But more than that, living with all sorts of disease, viruses, etc, meant that those that survived were TOUGH (sorry for caps, usually hate it but need to emphasis that point).

So what i could pound on a rock today is nothing like what someone 3'000 years ago could achieve. I honestly think that when you combine this with the techniques that we know were used back then, much of the "mystery" that some see disappears.



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 01:11 PM
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This is a topic near and dear to me. As someone who actually cuts stones for Lapidary work, I am very familiar with modern tools and techniques used to cut hard stone. I've seen the same type of markings left behind on cut stones that are included in the OP and the video.

Modern tools for cutting stone utilize diamond powder bonded to saw blades using a process called Sintering.

I think the copper tool explanation is complete BS. I've read that some Egyptologists speculate the use of Emery (Corundum MOHs 9) stones as cutting points. But no one has put forth a reasonable explanation as to how those cutting points were cut and set into the metal for such a use; that process alone would be even more difficult than cutting Basalt or Granite with a copper core drill.

This image of a cut stone exhibits the same traits that a stone cut with a circular blade does. It also shows that some stones were "over-cut" which happens frequently using power tools. I can't fathom why there would be over-cuts as much as an inch in depth using hand tools.



The megalithic sites with cut stones that defy explanation by traditional archaeology are a real problem for those guys (and gals in Byrd's case)...

The precision internal 90* cuts (Puma Punku), core drill rates (Egyptian sites), precise joints ( Machu Picchu and others) cut stones with hardness ratings of MOHs 8 or better and absolutely flat surfaces are all things that archaeologists can't explain satisfactorily.... and I think it makes them lose their minds a little bit...


They offer explanations and claim the use of tools that there is no evidence for. No tubular copper barrels or the wooden drill-shaft used for coring of rock have been found in the archaeological record from ancient Egypt.



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 03:03 PM
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I just watched (and truly enjoyed) this film made back in 2009.


It's always good to know that there are other people all over the world who refuse to subscribe to the Official Story. A story that simply can't be supported knowing what we know now ... that 'they' couldn't have known in Ancient Egypt. A knowledge that must have been developed by an advanced civilization pre-dating our own.



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 03:38 PM
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originally posted by: Blarneystoner
The precision internal 90* cuts (Puma Punku), core drill rates (Egyptian sites), precise joints ( Machu Picchu and others) cut stones with hardness ratings of MOHs 8 or better and absolutely flat surfaces are all things that archaeologists can't explain satisfactorily.... and I think it makes them lose their minds a little bit...


Actually, all these things have been demonstrated by Archaeologists.
But you should know that, if you'd done any research outside fringe sources



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 03:51 PM
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originally posted by: Marduk

originally posted by: Blarneystoner
The precision internal 90* cuts (Puma Punku), core drill rates (Egyptian sites), precise joints ( Machu Picchu and others) cut stones with hardness ratings of MOHs 8 or better and absolutely flat surfaces are all things that archaeologists can't explain satisfactorily.... and I think it makes them lose their minds a little bit...


Actually, all these things have been demonstrated by Archaeologists.
But you should know that, if you'd done any research outside fringe sources


No... they haven't been demonstrated. Please show me an example of a Puma Punku block with compound internal angles created using primitive copper tools and abrasives... I'll wait.



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 04:05 PM
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It is great that the truth has begun to come out, that not only the Egyptians but also the Greeks, Romans, and all the way to Medieval and Renaissance era Europeans benefited from lost technology in building and carving out stone.



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 04:09 PM
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a reply to: Blarneystoner
yep,id be keen to see that



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 04:26 PM
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originally posted by: Marduk

originally posted by: Blarneystoner
The precision internal 90* cuts (Puma Punku), core drill rates (Egyptian sites), precise joints ( Machu Picchu and others) cut stones with hardness ratings of MOHs 8 or better and absolutely flat surfaces are all things that archaeologists can't explain satisfactorily.... and I think it makes them lose their minds a little bit...


Actually, all these things have been demonstrated by Archaeologists.
But you should know that, if you'd done any research outside fringe sources

And tools and methods used were shown in Byrd's links - with references.

Harte



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 04:29 PM
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originally posted by: Blarneystoner

originally posted by: Marduk

originally posted by: Blarneystoner
The precision internal 90* cuts (Puma Punku), core drill rates (Egyptian sites), precise joints ( Machu Picchu and others) cut stones with hardness ratings of MOHs 8 or better and absolutely flat surfaces are all things that archaeologists can't explain satisfactorily.... and I think it makes them lose their minds a little bit...


Actually, all these things have been demonstrated by Archaeologists.
But you should know that, if you'd done any research outside fringe sources


No... they haven't been demonstrated. Please show me an example of a Puma Punku block with compound internal angles created using primitive copper tools and abrasives... I'll wait.

"Show me a block..."

How about show me an ancient power tool?

You seem to be unaware of the metallurgical tradition in South and Central America.

Harte



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 05:45 PM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Marduk

originally posted by: Blarneystoner
The precision internal 90* cuts (Puma Punku), core drill rates (Egyptian sites), precise joints ( Machu Picchu and others) cut stones with hardness ratings of MOHs 8 or better and absolutely flat surfaces are all things that archaeologists can't explain satisfactorily.... and I think it makes them lose their minds a little bit...


Actually, all these things have been demonstrated by Archaeologists.
But you should know that, if you'd done any research outside fringe sources

And tools and methods used were shown in Byrd's links - with references.

Harte


Actually .....


Representation of craftsman rip sawing a vertical (wooden) plank from the tomb chapel of the vizier Rekhmire' at Thebes, 18th Dynasty




Tell me, tell me, tell me lies
Tell me lies
Tell me sweet little lies




posted on May, 5 2016 @ 06:07 PM
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a reply to: Snarl


that was cool...thanks for posting.



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 06:36 PM
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originally posted by: jovan

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Marduk

originally posted by: Blarneystoner
The precision internal 90* cuts (Puma Punku), core drill rates (Egyptian sites), precise joints ( Machu Picchu and others) cut stones with hardness ratings of MOHs 8 or better and absolutely flat surfaces are all things that archaeologists can't explain satisfactorily.... and I think it makes them lose their minds a little bit...


Actually, all these things have been demonstrated by Archaeologists.
But you should know that, if you'd done any research outside fringe sources

And tools and methods used were shown in Byrd's links - with references.

Harte


Actually .....


Representation of craftsman rip sawing a vertical (wooden) plank from the tomb chapel of the vizier Rekhmire' at Thebes, 18th Dynasty




Tell me, tell me, tell me lies
Tell me lies
Tell me sweet little lies


What made you decide not to post about the stone working tools? Do you claim none were to be found at Byrd's links?

You know, like the copper saws being used in this:

(Two workmen drilling stone vessels.
Tomb of Mereruka
Source: John Albert Wilson, Thomas George Allen eds, The Mastaba of Mereruka, University of Chicago, Oriental Institute Publications, Volume XXXI, 1938, Part I, plate 29)

Harte



posted on May, 5 2016 @ 07:00 PM
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originally posted by: Harte
(Two workmen drilling stone vessels.

They don't appear to be drilling stone vessels. What makes you think they're 'drilling'.

I think the story they're portraying was how they attempted and failed to figure out how those "impossible to make with copper tools" artifacts could have been fabricated. You're funny Harte.




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