It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Who here loves soup?

page: 1
14
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 02:18 PM
link   
I don't know what it is, but ever since I can remember I've just LOVED soup!!

I love to eat it, I love to make it, I love it at the restaurant (even though I know it's a good way to get rid of leftover and dated stuff). I love meaty soup, I love chowder, I love stew, bisque is a bit of a muse, but I like it too. I love hot soups, I love most cold soups (gazpacho in particular) and I even love to use soup for cooking. I just love everything about soup.

I don't know why I'm such a soup nut, I don't eat it every day, but when I do I'm happy. I'm not much of a 'gut' guy, so I don't like soups with what I consider to be offal in them (i.e. brains, liver, kidneys, stomachs, intestines, etc.), but I don't eat those things in food other than soup either. I don't really consider tongue or tail as offal so...in the pot it goes!

I love the concept of what I call "whatchagot". Some of the best soups I've ever made were 'Whatchagot' soups. Take a left over chicken carcass, some spinach you had for salad, the rest of that onion, that one lone sausage in the frig, maybe a can of white beans then add in some salt and pepper...voila' SOUP! The possibilities for delicious soup are endless. Not all my soups are 'whatchagot' style and many come from recipes, but even then I can tell a little twist I'd like to make.

Yes, I love to cook also (being married to a graduate Chef doesn't hurt either), and I don't always make soup (seldom actually), but I always love it when I do. Prior to meeting my wife I was an amateur collector of cookbooks (among other things). I have an entire wall of cookbooks in the library, inside them probably more recipes for soup than I could even count. And even though I love to cook, grill, smoke, (baking not so much) and of course EAT, I find that cooking soup is one of the more satisfying elements of cooking. I think it has something to do with the whole experience.

I love the prep for soup, I love that it takes a while to cook and become "soup", the smell of it cooking, how the flavors all blend together, but you can taste each ingredient. I find it immensely interesting how very subtle ingredient changes can change the whole character of a soup. I also love that you can experience the whole development and maturing of the flavors by smell as the soup cooks. I love the colors, the experience of eating soup and how soup just seems to make all the accompaniments taste better.

It's hard for me to imagine a better smell than coming into the house from outside on a cold fall day and having the smell of that big pot of soup you put on earlier hit you. MMMMMmmmmmmm!

How many here love soup??

P.S. Maybe I'll go have some soup! Let's see what have we got? A little bit of wild rice, some chicken, some corn, some white rice....yep Chicken & Rice soup sounds pretty darn good!




posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 02:21 PM
link   
You managed to hit the one "food" I detest: Soup, and I'll eat most anything. My wife has learned to call whatever it is "stew" so it will pass under the radar. Not to derail, but hey! It was the headline that got me!



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 02:23 PM
link   
a reply to: schuyler

Well, to each their own I guess.

Heh...more for me!




posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 02:23 PM
link   
a reply to: schuyler

No soup for you !




posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 02:29 PM
link   

originally posted by: schuyler
You managed to hit the one "food" I detest: Soup, and I'll eat most anything. My wife has learned to call whatever it is "stew" so it will pass under the radar. Not to derail, but hey! It was the headline that got me!


Me too.. Especially Chinese soup although some say it is purrrfect..



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 02:30 PM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Soup is bloody awesome !

I love a good hearty soup... a full meal in a bowl and only one pot to wash !

Most times I'll make a big batch of soup when I'm digging through the fridge and freezer to clean stuff out before it starts going bad (ie: meat that's starting to get a bit of freezer burn, etc). Toss everything into a pot, set it to medium low, and let it simmer all day until the flavours meld nicely together.

Nom nom nom.

And the added bonus is that it's always better the next day !




posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 02:39 PM
link   
I like soup, great way to get all your veggies down you, I love Dahl too. Almost as much as a curry. A good Dahl and some naan is always good, if your trying to cut down your meat consumption



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 02:39 PM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk
Just had two throw in my two cents worth. I also LOVE soup and enjoy preparing it and eating it with my son. Year round I make at least one a week. Mostly cold soups in the summer. I love coming up with "watchagot" as well and enjoy using a variety of spices, herbs and ingredients. One of my favorites is a sea food chowder using smoked baby oysters to add a deep rich flavor.



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 02:51 PM
link   
There's an old short story by one of my favorite (comedy) authors, Patrick McManus. I think I have all his books, but I'll be darned if I can find the story. It is about Patrick as a little boy. He meets a hobo under the railroad tracks (picture a guy with a stick and a bandana tied at the end holding all his belongings). Patrick strikes up a conversation with him and the conversation lasts long into the afternoon. After a while the hobo breaks out his bandana full of stuff. Inside it is a small pot and some meager belongings. One of the other items is what the hobo calls his "soup stone" and he asks Patrick if he will stay and join him for some delicious soup. Patrick agrees and the hobo proceeds to make up some soup. As the hobo prepares the soup he tells Patrick the story of the legendary "soup stone". First he heats up some water, adds a little salt and pepper and tosses in the main ingredient...the soup stone.

Patrick is struck by how delicious the soup is and comments to the hobo that it's the best soup he's ever had. Patrick is hooked and asks where he can get a soup stone. The hobo tells him this long convoluted story about how rare they are. In time, Patrick has to go home. The next day Patrick goes in search of his very own soup stone. He eventually finds a stone which looks like the soup stone and tries it out. BLEK, the soup tastes like just hot water with dirt in it. After trying more stones and getting the same results, Patrick chalks the whole thing up as running into some enchanted guy and his magical soup stone, a story he recounts to his best friend.

Several days / weeks later, Patrick runs into the same hobo again under the train tracks. Patrick has been checking the spot where he met the hobo daily on his journeys. This time Patrick offers to trade the hobo something for his soup stone. I don't recall exactly what the hobo wanted, but it essentially amounted to some pretty hearty food supplies as I recall. Patrick runs home and raids his mom's pantry for the trade goods. He takes them back and trades them for the "legendary" soup stone.

Patrick eagerly runs to go meet with some of his friends and show them all the magical powers of the legendary Soup Stone. He fixes everyone up a batch of stone soup...they all hate it. It tastes like hot water and dirt. Patrick realizes that it was the legend of the soup stone which made the soup taste so good, not the stone itself. Patrick feels duped at first facing the ridicule of his friends and the ire of his mom, but ultimately finds solace in the fact that, should times ever get hard, he can conjure up the legend of the soup stone in his mind and always have a delicious bowl of soup.

-----

It's a really cool story, I just wish I could find it again.


edit on 4/16/2016 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 03:03 PM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Yes I love "soup"

I tend to drink soup from a Cup nowadays rather than having it in a Bowl.

Vegetable or French Onion are my main choices.

I also like cabbage and carrot water, which I suppose could be called a "soup"



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 03:06 PM
link   
My fave is butternut soup and seafood chowder-i make then quite goodly.But whatchagot soups can be highly delish too



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 03:07 PM
link   
Here in the American SW we have all types of Chili, manudo, pasole, not perhaps a classic liquid style soup but with a corn or flour tortilla, soapapilla or even a cornbread biscuit. yum!



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 03:32 PM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Love soup!

We used to make a sausage soup that was divine...may sound odd.

Spicy sausage, potatoes, onion, garlic, evaporated milk (or cream) chicken broth and voila...

It is quite heavily laden with calories and sodium though...but, one bowl was never enough.



Seems I remember Dad putting cheese in it but, I didn't prefer it that way

edit on 16-4-2016 by TNMockingbird because: added



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 04:01 PM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Im with ya brother... One of my Fav Food is and always has been soup(s)

I don't know where you live, but IF you ever happen to run into a Pho restaurant... Do yourself a favor and stop in



Best soup ever... i've lived off of it in the past...

And speaking of soup Nazi's... I have the recipe for Muligatani soup... IF anyone has seen that episode of Seinfield, its an indian soup... so frickin expensive to make... but its really good




posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 04:09 PM
link   
While I don't mind soup, I'd much prefer a good stew!


In Winter I love making this lamb stew... I don't have the website for the recipe I got it from now, but it's amazing. I start cooking it in the morning, adding onions and potatos and carrots throughout the whole day, by dinner time it's a glorious stew with dissolved vegetables having thickened it and chunky vegetables still existing alongside the meat! Om nom nom.

I tend to really only have soup if I'm feeling sick... and then... I admit it!!!! It's only a cup-a-soup, flavoured powder mixed with boiling water
*hides*.



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 04:13 PM
link   
a reply to: Akragon

I lived in SE Asia for two years. Yeah, I've eaten more than a little Pho.



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 04:15 PM
link   
I love a good pot of soup. My salivary glands can just sit back and take a break.
Nothing can defeat a hangover like some good chicken noodle soup.
It's also a great Blind Melon album.

edit on 16-4-2016 by skunkape23 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 04:56 PM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

One reason I hate summer to come soup is wonderful for winter. I just created an asian noodle last night. My favorites are tomatoey with fresh baked bread i leave the wife to do that part!



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 05:11 PM
link   
Hmm soup....
For a time I would make soup almost everyday, due to health reasons, but I found out it's also an easy way to cook. WIthout the hassle of constantly having to supervise it.
I just buy a bunch of different vegetables normally greens, lots of onion, garlic, salt or miso, and if I want it a bit chunky I'll add chicken or fish and seafood or quorn pieces, sometimes a couple spoonfuls of rice or other grains.
And it's delicious, nothing better on a cold night.





posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 05:22 PM
link   
I sometimes wish I lived closer to the coast, seafood chowder is something I'd really like to experiment with. However, it's hard finding good fish to make seafood chowder with in the mountains and I don't think salmonids (trouts, salmon, etc.) or other oily fleshed fish lend themselves well to soup. I could be wrong, but I wouldn't think so.

Regarding Asian soups like the Vietnamese Pho and Japanese soups like "noodles" (as they're called locally), I really like these soups too (some are fantastic), but usually the cooking process for these soups is quite fast so you don't really get the full "soup" experience.

On a side note about true Asian food in general, many true Asian dishes involve a rapid high heat process which is more about the flavor of the raw ingredients (lightly seared) than about long infused cooking processes. Americanized Asian cooking is FAR different than the 'real-deal' Asian food. Most westernized people wouldn't even recognize real Asian food unless they travel to Asia and experience it for real. I can speak from experience on this count.

Back to soup, I neglected to include another of my favorite pursuits, chili. I'm not sure if chili really falls into the soup category, but I love it for all the same reasons I do soup. So I guess I should include it. I've been known to compete in a few (understatement) chili cook competitions. Chili is another of those foods where the sky is the limit in terms of contents, consistency, spices, methods, etc. Shoot, just the no-beans vs. beans could be a thread of its own.




top topics



 
14
<<   2 >>

log in

join