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Possible Supernova in Messier 80

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posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 07:22 AM
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While observing the southern sky, looking at Mars and Saturn, I witnessed a single point of light appear in the area of the M80 globular cluster. The flash must have reached several orders of magnitude greater than Jupiter is currently. Whatever it was looked like a giant camera flash in the sky.

Messier 80:



Could this have been a supernova? Most of the stars in that globular cluster have shed their outer layers from what I have read.

(Edit: supernovae generally take a bit to reach peak luminosity, wherein they last up to several weeks, so this occurrence is most likely a comet, iridium flare, or other. See posts below)

Thanks in advance for information on this sighting. I was under the impression that a Supernova would last longer visually, however I am sure there are factors that play into the relative magnitude as seen from Earth.


Aside: Mars is particularly bright right now, very strong orange color too. Makes a great view along side Saturn and Antares in the early morning.
edit on 16-4-2016 by OneGoal because: (no reason given)

edit on 16-4-2016 by OneGoal because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 07:28 AM
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I would have thought it would last longer and be brighter.. But I suppose it depends on several factors.
Also I'm sure a supernova would have been somewhere in msm by now.

Maybe one of our space brothers took a picture of you for future abduction.



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 07:31 AM
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a reply to: OneGoal

I saw something similar a few years ago and posted about it.

It could have been something like a supernova, but not sure. Not even sure such a thing would be seen by the naked eye.

www.abovetopsecret.com...


edit on 16/4/16 by Chadwickus because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 07:32 AM
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a reply to: Misterlondon

Hah im sure theyre already preparing the probe, unIess thats been more or less retired. I agree that a Supernova probably would last longer. Hopefully we can have some armchair experts chime in.
edit on 16-4-2016 by OneGoal because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 07:34 AM
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a reply to: OneGoal
How long did the "flash" last?
Did you see it through a telescope, binoculars or naked eye?



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 07:34 AM
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originally posted by: OneGoal
a reply to: Misterlondon

Hah im sure theyre already preparing the probe, unIess thats been more or less retired. I agree that a Supernova probably would last longer. Hopefully we can have some armchair experts chime in.


No the probing is still active..favoured by the ones from Uranus..



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 07:35 AM
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a reply to: Chadwickus

I believe so, and very cool that you saw a similar event. From some articles I've read, they say when Betelgeuse erupts it will be so bright that it should cast shadows at night in a moonless sky.



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 07:36 AM
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originally posted by: Saint Exupery
a reply to: OneGoal
How long did the "flash" last?
Did you see it through a telescope, binoculars or naked eye?



Naked eye. It was about 2 or 3 tenths of a second. It peaked in brightness before disappearing at a magnitude even greater than Venus at her best.



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 07:38 AM
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originally posted by: Misterlondon

originally posted by: OneGoal
a reply to: Misterlondon

Hah im sure theyre already preparing the probe, unIess thats been more or less retired. I agree that a Supernova probably would last longer. Hopefully we can have some armchair experts chime in.


No the probing is still active..favoured by the ones from Uranus..


God forbid if ever there were an invasion of Uranus




posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 07:40 AM
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originally posted by: OneGoal

originally posted by: Saint Exupery
a reply to: OneGoal
How long did the "flash" last?
Did you see it through a telescope, binoculars or naked eye?



Naked eye. It was about 2 or 3 tenths of a second. It peaked in brightness before disappearing at a magnitude even greater than Venus at her best.


Thanks. Definitely not a supernova. My guess would be a meteor trail seen end-on - i.e. it was coming right at you!




posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 07:42 AM
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I saw something similar a couple of years ago, but it was 3 flashes back to back from the same star.



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 07:45 AM
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originally posted by: Saint Exupery

originally posted by: OneGoal

originally posted by: Saint Exupery
a reply to: OneGoal
How long did the "flash" last?
Did you see it through a telescope, binoculars or naked eye?



Naked eye. It was about 2 or 3 tenths of a second. It peaked in brightness before disappearing at a magnitude even greater than Venus at her best.


Thanks. Definitely not a supernova. My guess would be a meteor trail seen end-on - i.e. it was coming right at you!



A sensible explanation and probably what the actual event was..
Good answer..



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 07:51 AM
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a reply to: OneGoal


Naked eye. It was about 2 or 3 tenths of a second. It peaked in brightness before disappearing at a magnitude even greater than Venus at her best.

Then it wasn't a supernova. pPerhaps sunlight reflecting off a solar panel on a satellite…

Iridium Flare



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 07:58 AM
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originally posted by: OneGoal

originally posted by: Misterlondon

originally posted by: OneGoal
a reply to: Misterlondon

Hah im sure theyre already preparing the probe, unIess thats been more or less retired. I agree that a Supernova probably would last longer. Hopefully we can have some armchair experts chime in.


No the probing is still active..favoured by the ones from Uranus..


God forbid if ever there were an invasion of Uranus


But if you've got some nasty Klingons around Uranus, it would be harder to probe.



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 08:00 AM
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Perhaps an atomic missile denoted light years away.

A photon torpedo going off.

Destruction of the fifth Death Star. May the force be with you.

I think Intrptr has it though as most likely answer.

P



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 08:08 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

It could be a satellite, hopefully the OP recalls the time he saw the flash.



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 08:08 AM
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a reply to: OneGoal

Helium flash? i think i have seen one as a child, but i am not sure (haahaa idiocracy).



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 08:29 AM
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originally posted by: Saint Exupery

originally posted by: OneGoal

originally posted by: Saint Exupery
a reply to: OneGoal
How long did the "flash" last?
Did you see it through a telescope, binoculars or naked eye?



Naked eye. It was about 2 or 3 tenths of a second. It peaked in brightness before disappearing at a magnitude even greater than Venus at her best.


Thanks. Definitely not a supernova. My guess would be a meteor trail seen end-on - i.e. it was coming right at you!




Cheers! I can see that being the case. I figured a supernova would last longer generally speaking.

Still was quite a sight to see a sudden white flash in the sky.



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 08:30 AM
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originally posted by: solve
a reply to: OneGoal

Helium flash? i think i have seen one as a child, but i am not sure (haahaa idiocracy).



Very interesting hypothesis too. I don't know much about the helium flash with regard to magnitude brightness.



posted on Apr, 16 2016 @ 08:31 AM
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originally posted by: Chadwickus
a reply to: intrptr

It could be a satellite, hopefully the OP recalls the time he saw the flash.




4:35 am Pacific.



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