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Carbyne: New strongest material in the world that's tougher than graphene

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posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 09:25 AM
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A new material stronger than the current forerunner, Graphene, is in the works. It's name is Carbyne and its developers claim that it's twice as strong as Graphene. This new strong material could pave the way for super strong, stable chains to be developed which will benefit humanity in many ways. Space Elevator anyone?



Step aside graphene, a new wonder material called carbyne has been created and it takes the title as the strongest substance known to man thanks to a breakthrough production technique. A team from the University of Vienna have successfully produced the super-strong material for the first time in a stable form (meaning it hasn't broken) which sees tensile properties 40-times that of diamond and double that of current science darling graphene.

The team's findings were revealed in science journal Nature Materials and explained how this new method could pave the way for bulk production of the super material, which is seen as the "holy grail of truly 1D carbon allotropes," said Lei Shi, part of the physics research team at the university.


I think this is exciting news! Especially in light of recent technological advances. Just think: combine this technology with 3d printing technology and you could make super strong structures, buildings that aren't limited by size, weight, or shape; traditional construction methods would be a thing of the past. I'm excited at the potential! What says ATS?

www.ibtimes.co.uk... rral&utm_campaign=rss&utm_content=%2Frss%2Fyahoous%2Fnews




posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 09:31 AM
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Can I build a suit of armor from it?
How soon?



posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 09:45 AM
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quot...
"SPACESHIPS!!!!"
/quot

Name the tele series...



Stargate Atlantis.


Can they make plates like 10X10meters?
Is it possible to create 3D fillaments from it?? Bulletproof vests, pants, jackets and what not...



posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 09:49 AM
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originally posted by: Miccey
quot...
"SPACESHIPS!!!!"
/quot

Name the tele series...



Stargate Atlantis.

Can they make plates like 10X10meters?
Is it possible to create 3D fillaments from it?? Bulletproof vests, pants, jackets and what not...


I think so....One thing for sure is that this will definitely change things...



posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 10:00 AM
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Here's a video on the subject, it seems they have come a long way since 1967. Superstrong and light!





posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 10:22 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

Houses that couldn't be destroyed by earthquakes or hurricanes.
Safer cars. Body armor. And yes spaceships!



posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 10:39 AM
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they should use it to make the knees of little boys pants out of. both my sons had jeans that would last through 2, maybe 3 wearings before they'd come home with a hole in the knee.

I was just as bad as a kid.



posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 11:03 AM
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And the hits just keep on coming!!
way cool!



posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 11:04 AM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
they should use it to make the knees of little boys pants out of. both my sons had jeans that would last through 2, maybe 3 wearings before they'd come home with a hole in the knee.

I was just as bad as a kid.


That would be the ultimate use of this technology! lolol!



posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 11:10 AM
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a reply to: lostbook
This is lab scale. The filaments are microscopic. It will take a while before fibers of any useful length can be produced.

Note that carbon burns in air and Carbyne has to be protected by wrapping it in nanotubes.



posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 11:22 AM
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They rolled up 2 sheets of graphene and rolled that up in a tube. They made the carbyne inside otherwise it falls apart as soon as they make it.

PS - Reported on the Graphene MEGAthread 2 days ago.
edit on 15-4-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: grammar nazi

edit on 15-4-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: stupid autocorrect



posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 11:42 AM
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a reply to: lostbook


Just think: combine this technology with 3d printing technology and you could make super strong structures, buildings that aren't limited by size, weight, or shape; traditional construction methods would be a thing of the past. I'm excited at the potential! What says ATS?

To big to fail?

We begin building tomorrow, now we really will reach to heaven and punch god in the face.



posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 12:08 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Even better: Why not mine the carbon from the surrounding air in the form of carbon dioxide and kill two birds with one stone? You know, clean the air and create new buildings while carbon locking in the building materials.

The argument against doing so is "it takes too much energy." Not when you have a nuclear fusion reactor. I think we will end up with so much excess energy that not only will we do the above but we will get off our duffs and clean up that island of plastic out there in the Pacific Ocean.


edit on 15-4-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: grammar nazi

edit on 15-4-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: tori spelling



posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 12:31 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF


Even better: Why not mine the carbon from the surrounding air in the form of carbon dioxide and kill two birds with one stone? You know, clean the air and create new buildings while carbon locking in the building materials.


Kelp and coral in oceans and forests sequester carbon just fine. At least they used to. Polluting the oceans and cutting down all the trees isn't helping.

Digging up the carbon and burning it to the air (fuel), dumping it in the oceans (leaks and spills) and spreading it around on the land (roads bridges and cities) isn't helping either.

Coal, oil and gas was supposed to stay buried, or turned to wood and coral.



posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 01:07 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

The inventors have never tried my wife's cooking. Its that bad even the dog knows better.



posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 02:00 PM
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a reply to: lostbook



This new strong material could pave the way for super strong, stable chains to be developed which will benefit humanity in many ways.


I wouldnt hold your breath, im still waiting for some good practical uses of graphene to hit the market



posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 11:28 PM
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originally posted by: PhoenixOD
a reply to: lostbook



This new strong material could pave the way for super strong, stable chains to be developed which will benefit humanity in many ways.


I wouldnt hold your breath, im still waiting for some good practical uses of graphene to hit the market


Yea, you know... I think they are working to
hard to find better faster lighter or whatever
stuff, that they forget to work on applications
for the stuff they DO know about....



posted on Apr, 17 2016 @ 05:09 AM
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Oh wow!

Is this anything like the "molecular aligned metals" from Philip J. Corso's 'Dawn of a New Age'? Heh..I only wonder cause I recently re-read his notes and had it in my mind.



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