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Players So ‘Upset and Distraught’ Over Chants That They ‘Weren’t Able to Finish the Game’

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posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 02:37 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Well, from one apparently uncultured barbarian to another, I guess I will just keep ignoring people who act like assholes.






edit on 13-4-2016 by AugustusMasonicus because: never go in against a Sicilian with death is on the line




posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 02:37 PM
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originally posted by: SeaWorthy
Where is your compassion hard nosed people?!

I agree, why would any providing organisation allow chanting of abuse at a youth sports event?
Is it allowed because of the precious constitution?
Is it allowed at privately owned sporting events? You know, the right to engage in racist chants?



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 02:38 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand

originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
You know how I learned you don't call a girl "fat"? In 2nd grade, a girls brother taught me that lesson. And i learned it well.

So that girls brother assumed 'authority' and infringed on your legal rights, but you support it?
How do you resolve that apparent contradiction?
As far as I understand it, the use of violence is illegal in response to simple insults in the US. Do you think that is constitutional or not?


No, you are incorrect.

en.wikipedia.org...

Our first amendment recognizes that there is a such thing as "fighting words".


The fighting words doctrine, in United States constitutional law, is a limitation to freedom of speech as protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

In 1942, the U.S. Supreme Court established the doctrine by a 9–0 decision in Chaplinsky v. New Hampshire. It held that "insulting or 'fighting words,' those that by their very utterance inflict injury or tend to incite an immediate breach of the peace" are among the "well-defined and narrowly limited classes of speech the prevention and punishment of [which] … have never been thought to raise any constitutional problem."




I'm curious more than anything as I have no dog in this fight. Legislation has tempered the racists in UK society, publicly at least. Without legislation the UK would be as racist as it was in the 70's and 80's. Legislation combined with generational die-off's has worked, very well.



You really believe that your government can legislate away racism? If you think that, I have a ton of anti-Syria threads from UK members to show you.



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 02:39 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand

No one is saying it should be allowed, or even that it is acceptable. I think what many of us are saying is that you let the bullies win when you allow them to get to you. Ignore them, it is what they fear most.



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 02:40 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: grainofsand

No one is saying it should be allowed, or even that it is acceptable. I think what many of us are saying is that you let the bullies win when you allow them to get to you. Ignore them, it is what they fear most.



/mic drop



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 02:42 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: Metallicus

Words hurt.

We need to have a waiting period for speech and a background check before anyone ever talks.

Group hug everyone!

(crying now)


Gosh this is funny
I loled

You win for the day



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 02:42 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Yeah, that's cool with me.
I know some racist people who keep their mouths shut because of legislation in the UK, some I work with ocassionally.
The legislation saves me the job of challenging them if they told the black guy they worked with how they really feel.
Legislation provides a societal framework which reduces my need to challenge racists, and if I do then the law will generally back up my use of 'reasonable force' to defend someone from such horrible folk.



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 02:46 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: DBCowboy

Yeah, that's cool with me.
I know some racist people who keep their mouths shut because of legislation in the UK, some I work with ocassionally.
The legislation saves me the job of challenging them if they told the black guy they worked with how they really feel.
Legislation provides a societal framework which reduces my need to challenge racists, and if I do then the law will generally back up my use of 'reasonable force' to defend someone from such horrible folk.


In the US, we don't have legislation making it a crime to say something racist.

We just observe societies right to address it as a social issue, not a legal issue.

You cannot legislate peoples thoughts. Legislating against racism is just flat out silly. Someone can walk up to my wife, call her a mojado, and when I beat their sorry ass for it, I won't go to jail for it. And we didn't even have to pretend that a law would help.



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 02:47 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand

originally posted by: SeaWorthy
Where is your compassion hard nosed people?!

I agree, why would any providing organisation allow chanting of abuse at a youth sports event?
Is it allowed because of the precious constitution?
Is it allowed at privately owned sporting events? You know, the right to engage in racist chants?


At least it is not the usual behavior.



“I could just see the hurt and pain on their face[s], and know that this was obviously something that they hadn’t seen before,” the coach added to the station, later noting: ”Seeing the impact on those kids is something I’ll never forget as a coach.



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 02:50 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

If I had been a parent at a similar event in the UK I would not have ignored them. The overwhelming majority of parents would not have ignored them. But then it wouldn't have happened these days.
That is a direct result of legislation, and 70's/80's Britain was as openly racist as your nation is now. Legislation stopped the dinosaurs expressing it, provided a platform for non-racists to challenge such behaviour, and as the dinosaurs died out the new generations accepted it as normal respectful behaviour.

Legislation worked and facilitated the situation of modern Britain today, sure there are loads of silent racists, that's cool, just they won't verbally abuse our kids at sports events these days.
Different cultures/societies is all. I prefer mine.



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 02:53 PM
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a reply to: kaylaluv

Thats not what you were advocating for though. You specifically said to shame them in front of the whole school. The fact that shaming, when its sanctioned by you, is acceptable and not just unacceptable all around shows your true colors.

Trump isn't a slur, if this story or these children want to make it one than that is their own bag of crap thy have to sniff up.

People yell stuff like that at games. If it was really so offensive wouldn't the school officials, referee, someone have said "Get those people out of here" The fact that that didn't happen says to me this wasn't that big of a deal and this is being blown out of proportion. Most likely because of the use of Trump in a story can get you a lot of likes and clicks while also pushing your agenda that all Trump people are racist bigots.




edit on 13-4-2016 by Bennyzilla because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 02:53 PM
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I had been called brown, among other slurs nearly my whole life. I should have ran away, off the earth.

Instead I don't let it bother me. It's terrible.

edit on 13-4-2016 by GoShredAK because: (no reason given)

edit on 13-4-2016 by GoShredAK because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 02:55 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand

You prefer legislation for morality. I prefer to allow society to deal with this on its own. We obviously differ.

The fact that it is being addressed and there is no legislation means the adults are capable of addressing the problem.

I still think the girls should have continued the game and proved to the bullies that their words meant nothing to them.



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 02:56 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
Someone can walk up to my wife, call her a mojado, and when I beat their sorry ass for it, I won't go to jail for it.

Are you telling me that in your state if a man verbally insults your wife you can beat him up and won't be convicted for assault???
Please, I'm interested, how badly are you allowed to beat him? One punch, broken nose? Sustained assault, no front teeth, maybe 10 broken fingers as you made him count it out loud as you break them?

Wow, I'm really interested!
Lol, I learned well how to negotiate 'reasonable force' rules in the UK and I've enjoyed being really good at it.
Can you stove a pint glass into a man's face at a pub in Texas if he called your wife a mojado?



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 02:58 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand

originally posted by: SeaWorthy
Where is your compassion hard nosed people?!

I agree, why would any providing organisation allow chanting of abuse at a youth sports event?
Is it allowed because of the precious constitution?
Is it allowed at privately owned sporting events? You know, the right to engage in racist chants?


No, I am saying that at the end of the day in sports the kid who is held in the most contempt by his fellows is the one who says, "Things aren't going my way, so I'm going to take my ball and go home!" Thus ends the game and no one can play.

The crowd was most likely dealt with, but you can't always expect it to be dealt with on the spot at once. So you carry on and ignore it. They are only words. Ugly ones, yes, but just words from a bunch of people you do not know whom you will likely never, ever see again in your life.



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 03:02 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: grainofsand

You prefer legislation for morality. I prefer to allow society to deal with this on its own. We obviously differ.

No, I recognise where legislation has brought about societal change for the better.
I ignore the law all the time, it's only a bonus if it falls within my own ethical and moral considerations.
...and how does society deal with it? Beatings by parents on other parents? Is that allowed in the constitution?
If so it seems most of your parents are too # scared to call racists out in this OP.


The fact that it is being addressed and there is no legislation means the adults are capable of addressing the problem.

I still think the girls should have continued the game and proved to the bullies that their words meant nothing to them.

It would appear the adults were incapable of addressing the racist #ers and legislation could have helped.
How is it that the other parents didn't end up challenging it, do they not feel confident enough that the constitution would back them up?
BFFT seems to be saying that beating someone is allowed under the constitution if facing merely verbal attack...I don't believe him.



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand

Explain to me ... how would legislation help? All it does is at most force this stuff under the surface. It doesn't change anyone's point of view. Not only that, how do you write laws to protect people from being offended?

In this case, the crowd shouted "Trump, build a wall!" which in another venue would not be counted racist at all. In fact, there is no actual racial language there: no racial terms, no slurs, no nothing. So what part of the law would you write to cover this? Are you simply saying that because this girl took offense it becomes racist? Or does it become an offense because she found it so offensive?

If that's the case, half the things any of us types ... more than that actually for any of us ... could become offensive to any other person here. None of us could say anything.

So please, explain your great wisdom. How do you make a law to protect this poor fragile girl from the horrible experience of hearing things that might hurt her feelings? Because in the end, no one actually yelled any slurs at her. She made this into a racist experience.



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 03:20 PM
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originally posted by: amicktd
a reply to: ketsuko

Well then that's the difference because if my little girl dealt with this I would've been at the school the next getting this addressed. Trash talk, yea have at it that's part of the game. Blatant racism, not so much.


Yes we know you have made it very, very clear what you would have done. I can tell you right now your anger has you blind to what the other posters are saying. You somehow take disappointment in the girls as condoning the fans, these people are not saying that.

Relax, we all agree on the most important issue here.



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Britain in the 70's/80's was overtly racist, in society and on the 4 TV channels.
Anti-racist legislation was created making it an offence to verbally abuse people in public. This also provided a platform for people to use reasonable force to prevent such abuse.
Racist people drew back from abusing people in public when they knew the law backed the citizens who challenged them, they died off with each generation, new generations grew up seeing people as people, and now we have a British society which is not perfect by any means, but it's way nicer than what you have in the US.

A few decades and a bit of reasonable legislation is all it took.
Perhaps you prefer the right to shout racist abuse at school kids at a sports match?



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 03:31 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

I recall playing football against East Side in Paterson (the same school as the Joe Clark movie) and they sang us a cute little ditty called, 'Whites, We Hate'.

I got over it.


SO much for fair east side lol.!!! Joe clark lol.



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