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Tape up before you bug out - Scientists spend two years studying runners - Cheap Blister Prevention

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posted on Apr, 11 2016 @ 03:06 PM
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Never get blisters again! Scientists spend two years studying runners to discover a single strip of surgical tape is all you need

In tests, paper tape was applied to just one of each of the runners' feet. The untaped areas of the same foot served as a control. The tape, commonly referred to as surgical tape, is used for wound treatment. It is only mildly adhesive, which has an advantage because it doesn't tear the blisters if they do occur.

The tape was applied by trained medical assistants to either the participants' blister-prone areas or, if they had no blister history, to randomly selected locations on the foot. The paper tape was applied in a smooth, single layer before the race and at subsequent stages of the race, Lipman said. The medical assistants followed the runners for 155 miles over seven days.

For 98 of the 128 runners, no blisters formed where the tape had been applied, whereas 81 of the 128 got blisters in untaped areas. 'It's kind of a ridiculously cheap, easy method of blister prevention,' Lipman said. 'You can get it anywhere. A little roll coasts about 69 cents, and that should last a year or two.' He added, 'The best way to make it to the finish line is by taking care of your feet.'

The results will be published in the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine.
www.dailymail.co.uk...

Sounds like a plan if you go hiking, running or when SHTF. Has anyone tried this before as a prevention?




posted on Apr, 11 2016 @ 03:15 PM
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Scientists??? Hell I was taught in boot camp in 1982 that if I was prone to blisters, wear a thin sock inside of my sweat socks. The socks would rub each other, not my skin. If you couldn't do that there was a product known as "moleskin" to protect you from blisters. Who is funding these clowns?



posted on Apr, 11 2016 @ 03:17 PM
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originally posted by: JIMC5499
Scientists??? Hell I was taught in boot camp in 1982 that if I was prone to blisters, wear a thin sock inside of my sweat socks. The socks would rub each other, not my skin. If you couldn't do that there was a product known as "moleskin" to protect you from blisters. Who is funding these clowns?


dr. ignorance



posted on Apr, 11 2016 @ 03:25 PM
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If your boots or shoes don't fit you right you will get blisters. Like JIMC5499 said, wearing a thin sock inside your sweat sock will cause the friction to be between the 2 socks. I almost always use mole skin because I feel that it offers more protection. But I like the idea of using tape since you can get and hang on to more of it. Thanks for sharing.



posted on Apr, 11 2016 @ 03:26 PM
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originally posted by: JIMC5499
Scientists??? Hell I was taught in boot camp in 1982 that if I was prone to blisters, wear a thin sock inside of my sweat socks. The socks would rub each other, not my skin. If you couldn't do that there was a product known as "moleskin" to protect you from blisters. Who is funding these clowns?

Yeah, it took them two years. They just figured it out, I guess. Here's an article from almost a year ago that says pretty much the same thing with other useful information.


Tape

When taping up toes, heels, and other areas, follow the tips below: (Consider taping as a precautionary measure in blister prone zones, or, once a hot spot has formed).

Use medical tape, moleskin, Leukotape, hypoallergenic silk tape (which is designed to even stick to moist skin) or whatever type of adhesive dressing you have with you. Be vigilant with switching tape out; a painful open blister can result when the tape is removed after a long period.
www.outdoorgearlab.com...
edit on 11-4-2016 by gmoneystunt because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 11 2016 @ 03:27 PM
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so, would this also work on your hands, like when shoveling and such?



posted on Apr, 11 2016 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: chiefsmom

I dont see why not. Another useful tip from Survivorman with Les Stroud. He said if you feel a blister forming, slap it really hard to get blood flow and it stretches the skin back out and may even prevent the blister from developing. I tried it. It does work



posted on Apr, 11 2016 @ 05:44 PM
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a reply to: gmoneystunt

Absolutely works.I've done some ridiculous distances and this stuff saved me a lot of footache.

It's no good against chafing.Vaseline's the best for that.(all over your junk, between the thighs and where your backpack rests on your lower back.)



posted on Apr, 11 2016 @ 07:32 PM
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a reply to: gmoneystunt

Good to know for my next disney trip



posted on Apr, 11 2016 @ 08:43 PM
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Hikers and backpackers do this a lot, but we use duct tape instead. It doesn't lose its adhesive as quick.

Wool socks also work well for me.

Wearing liner socks inside another pair gets way too hot for me.
edit on PMMon, 11 Apr 2016 20:44:39 -050042016Monday1112016416 by ArnoldNonymous because: I speld sumtheen rong



posted on Apr, 11 2016 @ 11:06 PM
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I use nylon socks made from the same materiel as nylon panty hose inside my cotton or wool socks.

This stops blisters plus lets moisture wick away keeping your feet dryer.



posted on Apr, 11 2016 @ 11:20 PM
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originally posted by: JIMC5499
Scientists??? Hell I was taught in boot camp in 1982 that if I was prone to blisters, wear a thin sock inside of my sweat socks. The socks would rub each other, not my skin. If you couldn't do that there was a product known as "moleskin" to protect you from blisters. Who is funding these clowns?


Yep, I always wear 2 pairs of socks when I have a long tab ahead of me.

Though I do have a few pairs of expensive 2 layer socks, they aren't any better than cheaper ones doubled up.



posted on Apr, 12 2016 @ 12:35 PM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

Yep, moleskin came to mind immediately.

Who'da thunk that putting a barrier between your skin and the thing that rubs against it and causes blisters would--gasp--inhibit the formation of blisters?

They should have just asked us, I guess--could have saved them a lot of time and money.




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