It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Have you ever lost confidence in your ability to do the job you do? It's awful.

page: 2
13
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 12:10 PM
link   
a reply to: TerryDon79



Best advice I can give? It happens. Get over it. Sounds a bit harsh, but if you linger on it it will always be in the back of your mind and will creep back and make you feel incapable.

I think this is the best advice in the thread. It's ok for someone to take a moment and acknowledge their feelings, but then it's time to move on. If someone doesn't move on and they let their mind linger on thoughts of doubt, it can easily become a self-fulfilling prophecy.




posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 01:04 PM
link   
a reply to: nonspecific

I'm anxious every time I'm plastering or rendering, both tasks are effectively the final finish of everything else I or mates have done to a property. I'll be the one judged, never mind the crap stud walling, plasterboarding or block walls I'm hiding.
I stress over drying times, depending on the weather/heat/humidity, and it's not until the final trowel that I start to become happy with what I'm looking at.

I hate being watched, and if someone is not around me to actually assist in getting the muck on the walls or ceilings then I'll usually tell them to piss off out of my way.
I don't know why I get so anxious when starting every job because I have produced quality work for years now, I guess it is because I am the final finish of a project, so I'm the one who will be judged if it looks crap.

....as another member said earlier, it's the folk who never question their skills and abilities to watch out for. That's where complacency comes from.



posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 01:12 PM
link   
a reply to: nonspecific

I have the same problem once in awhile. You might consider watching a YT vid or two on a similar project.
It might refresh your memory and reinforce that you do, in fact, know what you're doing. It works for me.






posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 01:14 PM
link   

originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: nonspecific

I'm anxious every time I'm plastering or rendering, both tasks are effectively the final finish of everything else I or mates have done to a property. I'll be the one judged, never mind the crap stud walling, plasterboarding or block walls I'm hiding.
I stress over drying times, depending on the weather/heat/humidity, and it's not until the final trowel that I start to become happy with what I'm looking at.

I hate being watched, and if someone is not around me to actually assist in getting the muck on the walls or ceilings then I'll usually tell them to piss off out of my way.
I don't know why I get so anxious when starting every job because I have produced quality work for years now, I guess it is because I am the final finish of a project, so I'm the one who will be judged if it looks crap.

....as another member said earlier, it's the folk who never question their skills and abilities to watch out for. That's where complacency comes from.


It really is an awful feeling knowing that the job is down to you isn't it?

You seem like a good spread!

A lot of spreads and chippy's usually say "decorators will sort that out love, It'll be fine" and then F off leaving some pore mug to sort it out...



posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 01:23 PM
link   
a reply to: nonspecific

I've held a lot of jobs in my day. From low skilled, to technically skilled to management and teaching jobs. During that time I learned how to do a lot of things. My family and relatives always tell everyone, if you need something done to call on me! (Sometimes not always a good thing, as you probably already know. lol)

What's kind of crazy, is I'm the worst critic of my work. Everyone says I do awesome work, but I'm never completely confident or satisfied in what I do. If I ever do any kind of remodeling or graphic design job, after I'm finished I'm always critiquing the finished job. "I should have done this, or I should have done that. "

It's probably not too uncommon especially for people who are creative or work with their hands. I've had moments like you've mentioned, but I think it comes from being pressured. You feel like your friends are having higher expectations of your work, so your afraid your not going to meet their expectations. The truth is, most people can't tell a good job from a bad job sometimes.

As long as the customer is happy, that's what it's all about. If they find something they don't like than fix it to their satisfaction. I've designed things that in my eye looked awesome, but than my client wanted something that was simple and could have been done by someone with very little skill. That's ok though, just as long as they pay me for my time.




posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 01:28 PM
link   
a reply to: nonspecific

Lol, most jobs I'm building the walls/ceilings, boarding, rendering/plastering, then painting/wallpapering anyway, so if I can make the next stage easier I will.
What really really annoys me is lazy bastards who leave screws sticking 5 mil out if I haven't done the boarding myself, they get smacked in angrily with a claw hammer.

My favourite work is on the mostly old buildings here, joining say a stone wall to rendered areas but instead of using edge beads the client wants sexy freehand curves...I like that a lot, and there are a few places I sometimes drive past just to look and smile to myself that I did that.


On-topic, you finished the job nicely and faced your worries, move on to the next job with a smile...and hopefully not for mates rates next time!



posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 01:43 PM
link   

originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: nonspecific

Lol, most jobs I'm building the walls/ceilings, boarding, rendering/plastering, then painting/wallpapering anyway, so if I can make the next stage easier I will.
What really really annoys me is lazy bastards who leave screws sticking 5 mil out if I haven't done the boarding myself, they get smacked in angrily with a claw hammer.

My favourite work is on the mostly old buildings here, joining say a stone wall to rendered areas but instead of using edge beads the client wants sexy freehand curves...I like that a lot, and there are a few places I sometimes drive past just to look and smile to myself that I did that.


On-topic, you finished the job nicely and faced your worries, move on to the next job with a smile...and hopefully not for mates rates next time!


I know a few plasterers that would spark you clean out for leaving a screw protruding for them to ding a well honed tool on. One of the last things I do if I have built a stud wall is check every last one...

As to the next job I have retired now and moving on to a whole new venture, can't be arsed with it anymore and been trying to escape for years.

It's time to be the real master and boss of my life and not have to worry about this crap any more.





posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 01:44 PM
link   
Sometimes there is a job you just don't want to do.



posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 01:49 PM
link   

originally posted by: WeRpeons
a reply to: nonspecific

I've held a lot of jobs in my day. From low skilled, to technically skilled to management and teaching jobs. During that time I learned how to do a lot of things. My family and relatives always tell everyone, if you need something done to call on me! (Sometimes not always a good thing, as you probably already know. lol)

What's kind of crazy, is I'm the worst critic of my work. Everyone says I do awesome work, but I'm never completely confident or satisfied in what I do. If I ever do any kind of remodeling or graphic design job, after I'm finished I'm always critiquing the finished job. "I should have done this, or I should have done that. "

It's probably not too uncommon especially for people who are creative or work with their hands. I've had moments like you've mentioned, but I think it comes from being pressured. You feel like your friends are having higher expectations of your work, so your afraid your not going to meet their expectations. The truth is, most people can't tell a good job from a bad job sometimes.

As long as the customer is happy, that's what it's all about. If they find something they don't like than fix it to their satisfaction. I've designed things that in my eye looked awesome, but than my client wanted something that was simple and could have been done by someone with very little skill. That's ok though, just as long as they pay me for my time.



As to being your own worst critic I had to try and explain this to my neighbour after his first ever tiling job.

He was upset that one of the tiles he had cut was not right, no word of a lie it was a 2mm spacer and at one end of a 300mm tile the gap was about 2.02mm and the spacer would not quite hold.

I was trying to explain that only he would ever know that it was not "perfect" unless he was tiling a multimillion gold bathroom for the queen in marble but he would not have it.

I bet his wife that she could not find fault and she admitted defeat.

When you know it's not right it is awful but the layman will never see your "error".



posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 01:49 PM
link   

originally posted by: nonspecific
As to the next job I have retired now and moving on to a whole new venture, can't be arsed with it anymore and been trying to escape for years.

It's time to be the real master and boss of my life and not have to worry about this crap any more.

Ah don't be a tease! What's your new mission?

I made a career change to building after nearly a couple of decades using just pens and laptops, I don't miss wearing a suit but I imagine I'll change my mind again in a decade or so. I am quite fickle.



posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 02:02 PM
link   

originally posted by: grainofsand

originally posted by: nonspecific
As to the next job I have retired now and moving on to a whole new venture, can't be arsed with it anymore and been trying to escape for years.

It's time to be the real master and boss of my life and not have to worry about this crap any more.

Ah don't be a tease! What's your new mission?

I made a career change to building after nearly a couple of decades using just pens and laptops, I don't miss wearing a suit but I imagine I'll change my mind again in a decade or so. I am quite fickle.


Not that much of a change but over the years I have worn many hats, I was a bloody good chef, decent salesman, spent a few years as a regional account manager for a wholesale company, worked in a porn studio, worked most of the big UK festivals and god knows what else I forget.

Been trying for a few years to get into small scale manufacture of bespoke furniture, custom personalised dog beds to start with, always nearly got it off the ground and then got busy working to survive or buy tools but almost ready now.

When I was in an office environment I wanted to get back into getting my hands dirty. When I was half way down a hole or upside down behind a toilet trying to tighten a twat of a screw I wanted to die and wished I was back in the office chatting # with my feet on the desk sipping a nice coffee.

It's just life I suppose...

edit on 8/4/2016 by nonspecific because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 02:07 PM
link   
www.mayoclinic.org...

What you described is very familiar to me. I generally like my jobs and take pride in them. However lots of times I'm in avoidance mode as to "just get on with it". Stuff I've done hundreds of times and am quite competent at.

I've always used the analogy of a mule in the barn. If you get me moving forward things fall into place and it's like slipping into the old harness and things are fine. Getting me turned around facing the stall door and taking that first step is the mountain. Dunno why, and usually don't know when the avoidance is gonna kick in.

It's ridiculous.
I do know it's a confidence-shaker. How can you be so brilliant at what you do and let something like this de-rail you? I think that all the time an it makes no sense to me.

Whoever mentioned this might have been your first panic attack was probably right. It sneaks up on you and you're in it thinking it's something else. Cause you know, that crap is for someone else? It happens for no reason too, which for me makes it worse. If there was a reason I could "logic' my way out of it.

As it is, it's temporary. It'll pass and I focus on the little victories. Your work was great before you choked, the next job will be amazing as well. In fact I'm sure the help you gave the neighbor was invaluable to him and his bathroom is the jewel in his home now! Go easy on yourself. Beating yourself up, or fussing over it is a downward spiral and a waste of time.

Your next job will be killer, just rock it out and blow this off.



posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 02:12 PM
link   
a reply to: nonspecific

No. I'm awesome and you are too. Get in there soldier. You know exactly what to do.



posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 02:22 PM
link   

originally posted by: nonspecific
Been trying for a few years to get into small scale manufacture of bespoke furniture, custom personalised dog beds to start with, always nearly got it off the ground and then got busy working to survive or buy tools but almost ready now.

Ah, sounds good, best of luck



When I was in an office environment I wanted to get back into getting my hands dirty. When I was half way down a hole or upside down behind a toilet trying to tighten a twat of a screw I wanted to die and wished I was back in the office chatting # with my feet on the desk sipping a nice coffee.

It's just life I suppose...

Haha true!
I was concreting today with 3 mates, two mixers on the go, 85 full mixes in an inaccessible rear garden, still worked out cheaper than hiring a boom pump ready mixed wagon, and we made a good earner.
I was absolutely ruined though, still am lol, and at one point today I was sweating pints in the sun asking myself why the # am I doing this...then I remembered the earner, and the paid physical workout I was getting.
I'd be a fat bastard if I didn't do physical work, and I'd have to adapt my calories intake...especially beer.



posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 02:22 PM
link   
a reply to: nonspecific

It's like 'performance anxiety' and some subconscious BS kicks in and puts us off our game.

Maybe your subconscious was having some anxiety crisis about doing a great job for your mate? It happens.

I've been there and it's a WTF moment



posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 02:42 PM
link   

Haha true!
I was concreting today with 3 mates, two mixers on the go, 85 full mixes in an inaccessible rear garden, still worked out cheaper than hiring a boom pump ready mixed wagon, and we made a good earner.
I was absolutely ruined though, still am lol, and at one point today I was sweating pints in the sun asking myself why the # am I doing this...then I remembered the earner, and the paid physical workout I was getting.
I'd be a fat bastard if I didn't do physical work, and I'd have to adapt my calories intake...especially beer.


OK that kind of work exceeded my speed limits!
I love a physical job and would die a grim ugly death in a cube-farm desk-jockeying.


Right now I'm temping at factory jobs seeing what I like and learning fun stuff. Yes I'm too damn old for this kind of thing, no I'm not a tradesman, but I admire them greatly and I LOVE knowing I'm producing stuff that people by made right here in the USA. It's like being the last of the dinosaurs.

The job right now isn't physical enough for me, but sticking it out. Back in the day jobs like this were impossible to get if you weren't "connected". But much to my surprise right now there is a huge window where the "youngers" can't pass a drug test, or get off their phones long enough to pull a solid 12 at work. Companies are back to looking at us "oldsters" with new respect.

I envy you being able to do concrete work, and Non-Specific for plumbing and electrical. I can only identify problems, like yeah! THAT noise is the bearings are shot, and oh hell! The blower motor/compressor died/ electrical line has a short but can't fix it.


It sucks being 1/2 good at this stuff.



posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 02:46 PM
link   

originally posted by: grainofsand

originally posted by: nonspecific
Been trying for a few years to get into small scale manufacture of bespoke furniture, custom personalised dog beds to start with, always nearly got it off the ground and then got busy working to survive or buy tools but almost ready now.

Ah, sounds good, best of luck



When I was in an office environment I wanted to get back into getting my hands dirty. When I was half way down a hole or upside down behind a toilet trying to tighten a twat of a screw I wanted to die and wished I was back in the office chatting # with my feet on the desk sipping a nice coffee.

It's just life I suppose...

Haha true!
I was concreting today with 3 mates, two mixers on the go, 85 full mixes in an inaccessible rear garden, still worked out cheaper than hiring a boom pump ready mixed wagon, and we made a good earner.
I was absolutely ruined though, still am lol, and at one point today I was sweating pints in the sun asking myself why the # am I doing this...then I remembered the earner, and the paid physical workout I was getting.
I'd be a fat bastard if I didn't do physical work, and I'd have to adapt my calories intake...especially beer.


I remember the job that broke me on that side of things. "just a conservatory base my mate said, nice little earner!"

Except the conservatory was about 22 feet wide and 15 foot deep, not your average "conservatory". We got a mini digger and the acess was about a quater of an inch wider than the digger with 3 steps, half a day getting the thing in...

Then someone managed to drop the digger in the foundations and the track fell off and we bent it a bit and had to hammer it good before getting the hire company to come out and fix the track(after getting it out of the hole and blaming them).

Then when all was good and the concrete lorry was due to turn up one guy no showed and the mate who's job it was wife decided to go into labour half an hour before it turned up and he "HAD" to leave.

That left the guy laying the concrete and me and another guy who was the weakest and cheapest "he's a good lad and needs the cash, make the tea kind of chap" to run the concrete from the drive of the house in barrows, down the alley, up a plank, round a corner, down a plank, round another corner, up another plank and in.

After three quarters of an hour of patient waiting and doing a barrow each every 2 minutes the concrete guy dumped the load on a tarp and left and then the two of us had to shovel and barrow the second half of the load as it got stiffer and stiffer knowing that it had to be done or we were all screwed.

We got it done and I remember laying down in this customers garden unable to move and hearing the other guy trying to get up and then just having a little cry.

2 days later on a Saturday I got a call saying that the customer was unable to open his french windows as although our slab was good the windows were pissed and would not open and we had to go back with a scrabbler and skim it so his doors would open...

I have a day rate of £350 for that kind of work now so to avoid ever having to go through something like that again.



posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 02:55 PM
link   
a reply to: nonspecific

I've had exactly that very same experience working in the Federal Regulatory Compliance department of a major corporation. The Feds had gone hostile to our industry, changed up the rules and forms and I was having an ever increasing difficult time getting anything approved by them.

Sadest part was that I had to hang in doing that work for four long agonizing years of panic attacks and insomnia. It got so bad it was very difficult to hide because when asked to paper a project with forms for approvals I'd start visibly shaking with nervous tremors.

Frankly, I've never been quite the same since.



posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 03:03 PM
link   
a reply to: grainofsand



Just saw this and had to lighten the mood.

How much would you charge or would it be a freebie?



posted on Apr, 8 2016 @ 03:11 PM
link   
a reply to: nonspecific



I know a few plasterers that would spark you clean out for leaving a screw protruding for them to ding a well honed tool on. One of the last things I do if I have built a stud wall is check every last one...


Fair play, nails need knocking in flush and screws want that 1mm min rebate.

The plastering bastards still need to clean up their snots.



new topics




 
13
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join