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Going to school and working full time experiences

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posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 03:14 PM
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Hey all, I'm going to go to school but I have to support myself with no help.

I'm wondering... For those of you who have gone to school and worked full time how did you do it?

How long did it take?

What kind of work did you do?

How did you pay for college?

I'm trying to formulate a plan here.




posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 03:17 PM
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I did my freshman and sophomore year of college. It was a whip worked 8am-5pm and then school from 7-11 at night Monday through. Plus I had work on Saturday as well as one evening class on Saturday. I couldn't take it. It was to much. It all just depends though. That's a rough scheduled and not everyone is suited for that.

Good luck.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I paid for college by working. Having no social life. No time for friends really, it's a whip, it really is. My best advice to you is to not over work yourself. If you have the slightest doubt that it may be to much for you, take a step back and look at the picture as a whole. Perhaps maybe sign up for one less class. Or, don't take to many classes in one day.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

You will need to figure out how many courses you can take (and actually study for and do well in) while working. It may take you a little longer, but certainly doable.

On the other hand, it may make sense to take on more loans if it means you can get school completed more efficiently.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 03:27 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I can't give you any data regarding cost since I finished school in the 1990s. I went back for the last two years at age 45. I was married and had two children in college. My wife worked a full time job and I worked 4 part time jobs. I kept my credit hours down to 13-15 a semester. One of my part time jobs was a work study administrative position. All together my part time jobs were about 45 hours a week. Lack of sleep, many hours of homework, etc. If you are young I think it is easier but you have to stay focused. Good luck!



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 03:30 PM
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My aunt worked full-time, drove an hour to Wichita State and got her business psych degree on evenings and weekends while raising two kids as a single mother. It took her years, and she had the full support of my grandparents and my mom and dad when they could. But she did a lot of the heavy lifting she graduated summa cum laude (the one that's the second highest between summa or magna), so she earned it.

It was a few hours and lots of lack of sleep.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 03:31 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
Hey all, I'm going to go to school but I have to support myself with no help.

I'm wondering... For those of you who have gone to school and worked full time how did you do it?

How long did it take?

What kind of work did you do?

How did you pay for college?

I'm trying to formulate a plan here.


I worked the nightshift from 11PM - 7:30AM, then school from 6PM -10PM.

The classes were only 3 days a week, so those 3 days were rough. Other than that I just worked with the school to ensure I didn't have classes on weekends, so I could rest.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 03:36 PM
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I saved my vacation days for those days when I was up way to long working on a research paper, or running behind on a project, etc. That seemed to be my saving grace sometimes, so hopefully you are in a position to have vacation days as well. Oh and good luck on your endeavor. I won't lie to you it's gonna be a rough ride, but eventually your body gets used to it.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 04:10 PM
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Back when I was at university, it was still possible to make money as a musician. I played the bars and was a busker on the streets of San Francisco. I was a student at Cal State Eastbay and transfered to UC Berkeley for my MA in Anthro.

We all appreciated Mayor Alioto who saw that a vibrant art scene in SF was good for the city. Even mimes could make good money on the streets.



edit on 6-4-2016 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 04:13 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

Bachelors of Business Adminstration and Marketing (double major - was only an additional 4-5 classes, I believe) took me 7 years. It was mostly full time, with a couple of 1-2 class semesters and a full year off mixed in, due to burn-out.

I waited tables until I was 21, then bartended and bar-managed the rest of the way through. I was working probably on average 60 hours per week, sometimes more. I still ended up with some student loans, but paid as much as I could up-front (whilst reserving some for my "lavish" 20-something lifestyle.)

How it worked for me: I had a ton of fun in my 7 college years. I went to community college first, then a local (close-to-home) university, lived with my parents for about half of that time, in apartments the other half. Work was easy to schedule around school, since I mostly worked evenings, and mostly crammed my classes into the morning. I never really had to study, but, as a procrastinator, sometimes had to skip sleep entirely to write a paper at the last minute. The tradeoff to "going out / having fun", while still earning money and still doing well in school, for me, was drastically scaling back sleep, to an average of about 4 hours a day. As a night owl, this isn't so bad, as long as you can force yourself up in the morning. Eat healthy, squeeze in exercise, don't drink heavily too often.

Good luck - I'll never work > 40 hours a week again, even without school. 7 years of that will age you more than a 3-month Vegas bender.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 04:17 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

A GREAT piece of advice I can give you - look into "CLEP" exams. I saved more than $11,000 in tuition by doing these. clep.collegeboard.org...

College Level Examination Program - it costs about $250 per class (including the book to study to material), and you get 3-4 credits if you pass. I did this for a lot of prerequisites and courses like "Financial Accounting" when my college didn't offer the times or days I had off from work. I still had to complete most of my schooling through the Technical College I went to, but CLEP made it possible.

I did this for something like 14 different classes. As opposed to the $500 per credit, using CLEP I saved a heck of a lot of time and each credit was like $85 instead of 500. Your college may only accept certain ones, but I did this for so many different subjects and found it to be a major major help. I possibly wouldn't have even finished my school if I didn't use CLEP. Feel free to U2U me, I might even have study materials I can dig up for ya.
edit on 6-4-2016 by FamCore because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 04:19 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

It took me five years to finish and then I ended up getting my graduate school paid for and I also received a graduate assistantship which paid really well for 1988. I also had scholarships that I earned that helped pay for a good deal of my costs. I ended up mostly paying for room and board.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I did it 25 years ago, when tuition was a lot cheaper and employers a lot more generous.

The fees came to about £600 pa - my employer paid £480 leaving me to pay an affordable £10 a month. I also got £200 a year book allowance, an extra week's holiday a year and nobody minded if I worked on essays during quiet times.

I studied English lit so it wasn't particularly taxing. Essay deadlines could be a PITA, though, and I pulled more than a few all nighters with work the next day. Still, no different from all night partying: when you're in your twenties you have superhuman powers anyway.

Great fun, got letters after my name and went on to do a postgrad degree. I couldn't afford to give up work for three years for a PhD so I took a one year MA. Even then, the then-Tory government gave me the best part of five grand and free tuition. Then the REAL partying began!

I had had a pretty decent job with excellent career prospects but, once I got into the studying, I knew things would never be the same again. I'm earning less now than I would have done if I'd stayed on and followed that career path but hey, I work two days a week and life is good. I've l;ooked into doing a BSc in astrophysics - another passion of mine - but at £9000 + pa the universities can kiss my hairy middle aged butt.

If had to choose now, I'd learn a trade instead of going to college. It's all so different.

EDIT: forgot to mention it was a part-time course over four years, with most of the classes at 6pm
edit on 6-4-2016 by Whodathunkdatcheese because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 04:38 PM
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a reply to: Whodathunkdatcheese

Learning a trade is great but I've had a hard time getting in on the ground floor of trade jobs.

Might be cause I've lived in areas either economically challenged or with incredibly high immigrant populations.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 04:39 PM
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a reply to: FamCore

I'll look into that.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 04:40 PM
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originally posted by: slapjacks
a reply to: onequestion

I paid for college by working. Having no social life. No time for friends really, it's a whip, it really is. My best advice to you is to not over work yourself. If you have the slightest doubt that it may be to much for you, take a step back and look at the picture as a whole. Perhaps maybe sign up for one less class. Or, don't take to many classes in one day.


I keep hitting the obstacle of being able to afford everything. In a college area a lot of times your looking at 700 a month rent for a room.

700 for rent plus food and vehicle expenses unless you can situate yourself to not need a vehicle.

Very costly.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 04:41 PM
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originally posted by: Edumakated
a reply to: onequestion

You will need to figure out how many courses you can take (and actually study for and do well in) while working. It may take you a little longer, but certainly doable.

On the other hand, it may make sense to take on more loans if it means you can get school completed more efficiently.


I'm not opposed to students loans especially to learn a trade like machinist or HVAC where you will see a solid ROI

Do these loans incorporate cost of living expenses?



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 04:43 PM
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originally posted by: olaru12
Back when I was at university, it was still possible to make money as a musician. I played the bars and was a busker on the streets of San Francisco. I was a student at Cal State Eastbay and transfered to UC Berkeley for my MA in Anthro.

We all appreciated Mayor Alioto who saw that a vibrant art scene in SF was good for the city. Even mimes could make good money on the streets.




Must been nice to live in SF before the techies took over and dramatically increased cost of living.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 05:09 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I can't offer any advice but would like to applaud you for trying!
I didn't complete my education. Community college only. It is probably the single most regrettable thing in my life.

I had all of the help in the world.
I was married when I first started school. We lived in Central Florida and times were good!
My parents helped me whenever I needed it. I usually didn't have to ask.

I worked nights and weekends and made fistfulls of money. Fistfulls. That was my undoing.
The money. I never went or looked back!
As a young person one may think the 'easy' money will last forever (from working) but, it doesn't. Sure, I've done okay but, I always wonder what opportunities I've missed because of my impetuous and self indulgent choices...

So, for you to be working full time AND school full time without any support system is really tremendous. It WILL be hard. It was for me and part of the reason (I believe) I made the choices I did.

I just wanted to say don't give up! No matter how long it takes!
Keep on keepin on! And Good Luck!





posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 05:49 PM
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I'm working on a second bachelors right now. It's hard, especially with the engineering maths. Anyways I work about 45 hours a week and then do school work about another 20-25 hours on top of going to the gym. It's pretty tough.

Edit: my work is paying for my tuition so that's why I work so much. I work in healthcare right now and it's a sinking ship.
edit on 6-4-2016 by avgguy because: (no reason given)

edit on 6-4-2016 by avgguy because: (no reason given)



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