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'Game changing' stem cell repair system

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posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 06:03 PM
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The repair system, similar to the method used by salamanders to regenerate limbs, could be used to repair everything from spinal discs to bone fractures, and has the potential to transform current treatment approaches to regenerative medicine.

The UNSW-led research has been published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal.

Study lead author, haematologist and UNSW Associate Professor John Pimanda, said the new technique, which reprograms bone and fat cells into induced multipotent stem cells (iMS), has been successfully demonstrated in mice.

"This technique is a significant advance on many of the current unproven stem cell therapies, which have shown little or no objective evidence they contribute directly to new tissue formation," Associate Professor Pimanda said.

"We are currently assessing whether adult human fat cells reprogrammed into iMS cells can safely repair damaged tissue in mice, with human trials expected to begin in late 2017.

There are different types of stem cells including embryonic stem (ES) cells, which during embryonic development generate every type of cell in the human body, and adult stem cells, which are tissue-specific. There are no adult stem cells that regenerate multiple tissue types.

"This technique is ground-breaking because iMS cells regenerate multiple tissue types," Associate Professor Pimanda said.

"We have taken bone and fat cells, switched off their memory and converted them into stem cells so they can repair different cell types once they are put back inside the body."

The technique developed by UNSW researchers involves extracting adult human fat cells and treating them with the compound 5-Azacytidine (AZA), along with platelet-derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB) for approximately two days. The cells are then treated with the growth factor alone for a further two-three weeks.


www.sciencedaily.com...


What this essentially means is that in about 11 years in relation to "standards of treatment"? Is that people today who suffer from injuries related to the back and joints could result in a full recovery.



"Embryonic stem cells cannot be used to treat damaged tissues because of their tumour forming capacity. The other problem when generating stem cells is the requirement to use viruses to transform cells into stem cells, which is clinically unacceptable," Dr Chandrakanthan said.

"We believe we've overcome these issues with this new technique."


Same link..

This procedure has relevance with respect to treating injuries but also in relation to interfering with Aging.
edit on 5-4-2016 by Kashai because: Content edit




posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 06:10 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

Very interesting.

I didn't find anywhere that stated the success rate in mice though (apart from the 20% of either not working or delayed healing).

Will be interesting to see how this pans our with human trials next year though.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 06:12 PM
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Interfering with aging you say?

Billions spent on finding the elixir of life, sometimes comes up with other uses.

Great!!



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 06:16 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79


Agreed but there are discussing using Fat cells which to be honest would constitute a rather large supply in general.


I am searching for PDF/otherwise in relation to this research.


Often several heads are better then one.


The technique developed by UNSW researchers involves extracting adult human fat cells and treating them with the compound 5-Azacytidine (AZA), along with platelet-derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB) for approximately two days. The cells are then treated with the growth factor alone for a further two-three weeks.

AZA is known to induce cell plasticity, which is crucial for reprogramming cells. The AZA compound relaxes the hard-wiring of the cell, which is expanded by the growth factor, transforming the bone and fat cells into iMS cells. When the stem cells are inserted into the damaged tissue site, they multiply, promoting growth and healing.


www.sciencecodex.com...
edit on 5-4-2016 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 06:16 PM
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Sounds like it could work. We know that embryonic growth is formed from cells growing into a sphere, then a neural tube and then differentiating along different cascade paths to form limbs, fingers, tails, fins, heads (then eyes, ears, noses), digestive systems and internal organs. It's like origami except you can get selected volumes of cells to grow, differentiate and die off.
If you are able to push a cell back to the original embryonic state, then they can be made to go in any direction like teeth, hair fol1licles, cartilage, or even heart valves.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 06:18 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

I'm searching aswell.

My wife has had a disc problem for about 6 months. To think this new advancement could have repaired it in 1 month is very intriguing for me and her alike.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 06:21 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79


Myself knees and back so yes very interested in this.

Here is something related...


Scientists have successfully used neural stem cell grafts to repair the severed spinal cord of a rat, and re-establish connections between the nerve cells in the spine and the rat's brain (stock image). The findings take experts ever closer to a working treatment for debilitating spinal cord injuries in humans.


www.dailymail.co.uk... tem-cells.html
edit on 5-4-2016 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 06:45 PM
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I located free access to a related PDF file with this link....

www.researchgate.net...



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 06:49 PM
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originally posted by: Kashai
I located free access to a related PDF file with this link....

www.researchgate.net...



Thanks.

I'll have a proper read of it later and see what's what



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 07:25 PM
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Call me a cynical old grumpybum, but I've been hearing about this and waiting to walk again for 12 years. Don't get me wrong, it sounds impressive, but so have hundreds of other claims over the years. It all seems just so very hit and miss, and many are travelling to China to be injected with the latest greatest stem cell procedure. I get it, they are desperate. But whoever does come up with a complete cell repair technique will become the richest bio(tech?) company......... in the world.

Just realised why I'm so grumpy this morning, haven't had my morning poo yet.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: Qumulys

I get the cynical part, I truly do. That's one reason I'm looking into it more and so is the op.

Stem cell research has indeed been going on for years. Unfortunately the results in mice are not an indication of results in humans. That's why the human trials are starting next year (2017).

Still, even if it is found out not to work in humans, it (in my opinion) is still a very interesting subject to research.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 08:01 PM
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a reply to: Qumulys


This is a preliminary but really interesting in many ways.


Imaging going to you doctor and he or she tells you that you need to gain about 20 lbs. This is so they can extract fat cells that will then be converted into stem cells.


It is a game changer but human trials will determine if or not this actually works on us.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 08:47 PM
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a reply to: Kashai and TerryDon79

Well, I can happily say I'm fully prepared so my doc can have a field day and start sucking down on my fat stores for me and the whole waiting room, I knew this delicious padding of burgers and nuggets was for good reason, why else does it taste so good???

I've heard of human trials starting for years and years as well. I wan't this to be a thing more than anything, don't get me wrong. We should be researching this flat out, by the minute nuances of the human body and the reality of controlling how and what gets repaired I fear is still a long way off fixing me up a good 4 inches of juicy fresh spinal cord. Even then, how will my body for example 'feel'. Will scratching my left knee feel like I'm giving my arm a Chinese (not racist is it?) burn?

All I'm saying is, I'll be exited when there are hard results and people queuing up in a rolling wheelchair brigade at the docs and running out again ready to mug weary old ladies and leg it from the cops.

edit on 5-4-2016 by Qumulys because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 08:52 PM
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a reply to: Qumulys

I'd be happy to donate fat too. Still got my winter fat from 10 years ago plus interest lol.

If you think about how human trials go it would most likely have preliminary results after 6-9 months, then more trials, more results etc. It could realistically be around 2-5 years from the first human trials to actual treatment (if it's a success).



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 09:15 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79


As presented in the OP we are looking at practical applications in about 11 years.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 09:18 PM
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originally posted by: Kashai
a reply to: TerryDon79


As presented in the OP we are looking at practical applications in about 11 years.



Oh I know that, but the first treatments are likely to still be classified as trials.

My wife has cancer (hereditary) and her doc has actually recommended a treatment to slow it down. It's been out of clinical trials for about 6 months, but it's still classified as a trial.

ETA: I think it's called working trials, but I could be wrong.
edit on 542016 by TerryDon79 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 09:56 PM
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I would love to replace my spine, hip, knee & foot - humans lose when hit by cars. I'm hoping that brain transplants and cloning get perfected. 😄

Imagine all of the healing this could potentially do. But, just as Devil's Advocate, how crowded this planet would get? How many people would be vying for the limited resources, employment opportunities, space to live and breathe? Technology is amazing, but there is something to be said of the natural order of things. And what happens if only the "elite" have access due to cost? I already can't afford to get some procedures that would enhance my quality of life.

Believe me - it would be awesome for me, for TerryDon's wife, grumpy Qumulys, and scores of others here. The consequences would need to be addressed as well.

I must be grumpy too.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 10:13 PM
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a reply to: Lolliek


Amongst other things many people would be able to go back to work.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 02:54 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

this is all so interesting , won't know until they do the human trials but looks promising so far..... and what if it is really successful.....more people being able to go back to work less people needing goventment help is good, but then are there enough jobs out there...would finding a job be even harder.

if they can make parts for your heart or other organs that need to be fixed replaced...the population goes up even faster,

boggles the mind for sure



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 07:36 PM
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a reply to: research100


It presents that we will be able to convert Fat cells into Stem Cells creating a whole new purpose of Liposuction.

Of course human trials need to be completed but in relation to the chemistry of fat from mice as opposed to fat from humans?

I can see why they want to begin human trials so soon after this success.

To be clear the difference between the fat of a mouse and that of a human relates to the DNA which is not really an issue here.
edit on 6-4-2016 by Kashai because: Content edit




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