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"Judge" orders torture tasering attack of defendant.

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posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 02:33 PM
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I don't like the title of the video because I don't believe that race had anything to do with it.

I think the judge was annoyed and ordered the Sheriff to torture the guy because he wouldn't shut up.

Not only does the judge "order" this attack ("do it!") but the retarded cop actually listened!

A judge has plenty of options at his disposal. A person can be charged with contempt, he can be fined, he can be removed from the court room. The judge could have ordered a recess and lectured the guy... there are a ton of ways that this could have been handled.

We as a nation are in big big trouble.




posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 02:37 PM
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a reply to: gladtobehere

So, where's the charges for the deputy? I'd say the judge and deputy made a conspiracy to deprive of civil rights under color of law, and the deputy made the overt act. How about a nice 5 year mandatory minimum sentence in federal prison for them both?

And let's disbar the judge while we're at it.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 02:40 PM
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What in the hell of everything judicial?

Cuff him, remove him from the court room, but to have the guy tasered?

When Judges can order this kind of punishment, simply because someone will not keep quiet, then I truly believe the U.S is in trouble. Unbelievable.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 02:45 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam




And let's disbar the judge while we're at it.

According to the story, he has been permanently removed from the bench.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 02:46 PM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: Bedlam




And let's disbar the judge while we're at it.

According to the story, he has been permanently removed from the bench.


He can still practice law, though. I'd like to see him sidelined permanently.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 02:47 PM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: Bedlam




And let's disbar the judge while we're at it.

According to the story, he has been permanently removed from the bench.


He can still practice law, though. I'd like to see him sidelined permanently.

Good point.
I think it is sad that he would only face a misdemeanor charge. With great power comes great responsibility... right?



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 02:48 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

I agree, though I believe 'attempted murder' should be one of the charges against the judge and his pawn. I'm perfectly serious too, not trying to be superlative here. Tasers can kill. They shouldn't be used because someone is being disruptive.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 02:50 PM
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A normal Judge would have had him charged with contempt of court. He would then have been cuffed and removed.

That's how it always happens.

As far as charging the deputy. Maybe, but then again he was following the orders of his superior. That's a little more murky.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 02:53 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

But Ze polize officer vas only following ze judge's ordaas.

Heard that somewhere before...can't quite remember where.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 02:56 PM
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originally posted by: amazing
As far as charging the deputy. Maybe, but then again he was following the orders of his superior. That's a little more murky.


I hate to bring Hitler into the conversation but that was no excuse then. Why should it be now?



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 03:00 PM
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a reply to: gladtobehere

I'd like to know what maximum penalty the man was facing and what the judge ended up giving him. It would give far more contexts as to what the judges motivation was.

Not trying to justify it, but maybe the judge was like, "this goose ain't worth my time, just stun him and be done with it"... lol.

Then again, if the dude was sentenced to serve time anyway... then obviously, the judges actions were very concerning.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 03:04 PM
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originally posted by: amazing
A normal Judge would have had him charged with contempt of court. He would then have been cuffed and removed.

That's how it always happens.

As far as charging the deputy. Maybe, but then again he was following the orders of his superior. That's a little more murky.


I don't see it. If the judge ordered the deputy to execute the guy then and there, would it be lawful? Would the order protect the deputy when he did it? No, of course not. Where do you draw the line?

The judge can order the defendant brought to order. He can be seated by force. He can be removed. But you can't, say, have his lips stapled shut. The judge can't lawfully order the deputy to pick up a letter opener and stab the guy in the eye, or take out a baton and beat him into silence. So there's a point where the judge can't give that order. And I'd say it's at the point that physical injury occurs, unless the guy is threatening or is harming someone. And he wasn't.

So, ordering the deputy to physically harm the guy to silence him is likely the point where the order is unlawful. And the deputy did it. He should have known he could not do that.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

In Trump's New America, the judge and the cop would probably get a medal.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 03:07 PM
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That was just dumb. First Judicial Darwin Award goes to Maryland Judge Robert Nalley.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: gladtobehere

Wow, I'm glad I live in the UK, court here is not really scary at all.
Even back in the day the worst you could expect was a minor beating in a holding cell, but with all the CCTV these days that doesn't happen any more.
Saying that though, the judge was being recorded and didn't give a toss...yep, again, wow.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: Subaeruginosa

He was there on some sort of gun charge. He's actually still in the court room as a defendant meaning he's not even guilty yet. What if he actually beat the charges??? The judge would then be electrocuting a totally innocent man for trying to defend his innocence.

How and when did this ever get approved??? Did anyone here vote this in??? Was there a vote??? Who decided this was ok??? Has it been tested?? How often is it used??? On who??? What is the procedure for this???

Anyone have answers for these questions??? Because if you don't, you should be aware that you might be next for all you know. Or someone in your family or friends. What justification is given to remotely shock someone with 88,000 volts??? Ever touched a hot wire in your house??? That's 120 volts.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

I think you guys are right. I just wonder what would have happened to the deputy if he would have refused. I think he would have been disciplined by the judge and that discipline that could have included firing wouldn't have made the headlines. I'm not arguing against anything your saying just wondering.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 03:24 PM
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a reply to: gladtobehere
Sounds to me like the judge use a little tasering himself. Right in the ass.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 03:36 PM
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originally posted by: amazing
A normal Judge would have had him charged with contempt of court. He would then have been cuffed and removed.

That's how it always happens.

As far as charging the deputy. Maybe, but then again he was following the orders of his superior. That's a little more murky.


It has been widely established that " just following orders" is not an excuse for criminal conduct since the end of World War 2.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 03:40 PM
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originally posted by: amazing
a reply to: Bedlam

I think you guys are right. I just wonder what would have happened to the deputy if he would have refused. I think he would have been disciplined by the judge and that discipline that could have included firing wouldn't have made the headlines. I'm not arguing against anything your saying just wondering.


A judge cannot fire a deputy, only the sheriff can do that.




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