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Egyptian hieroglyphics what is looked for?

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posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 04:51 AM
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a reply to: ProfessorPatternfish

No one can know everything but everyone can know something.




posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 05:06 AM
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originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: ProfessorPatternfish

No one can know everything but everyone can know something.


Agreed.

And some people can know lots of things about lots of things.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 05:08 AM
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heres the wiki for A to L, why not update them, i'm sure your input would be welcome.
all those years wasted translating the rosetta stone for nada.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 05:20 AM
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originally posted by: stinkelbaum
heres the wiki for A to L, why not update them, i'm sure your input would be welcome.
all those years wasted translating the rosetta stone for nada.


It is widely acknowledge and understood. That a lot of history is being suppressed.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 08:52 AM
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originally posted by: ProfessorPatternfish

Are you implying I am making this up as I go along? That I haven't done the research?


Well, the piece you posted isn't actually Egyptian. It's a composite of fragments of words (not from the same source and some aren't words) and a drawing of a pectoral that wasn't found with those words....

...done by an European sometime after 1700 AD.


That I do not keep finding the same patterns over and over? Because I do.

And so do many others.


Possibly because it was done by a European (after 1700 AD) who liked those symbols and wasn't done by an ancient Egyptian? I've seen others try to use these fake documents as proof of something (or old translations of a real document). Or worse, they use low resolution images of only one document (as if that's all the Egyptians had ever done in 3,000 years) and show only PART of the whole wall (or temple) and try to say "ta-daa! I've solved it!"

That's like a mechanic looking at a Japanese manga showing only one letter on your license plate and telling you what's going on with your car engine. If you want to understand the car, you have to look at the whole car... not at a Japanese interpretation of one letter on the state name on the license plate.
edit on 5-4-2016 by Byrd because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 08:58 AM
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a reply to: Byrd




done by an European sometime after 1700 AD.



Interesting to me that you mention this.

Thank you.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 05:28 PM
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originally posted by: ProfessorPatternfish

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: ProfessorPatternfish
a reply to: Phage

Far from it. It is much better to use ones brain and understand what the Ancients knew. Then apply.


It's certainly much easier than studying.

Harte



Are you implying I haven't studied? or researched?

I'm implying nothing. I'm flat-out asserting it.

Harte



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 05:31 PM
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originally posted by: ProfessorPatternfish
a reply to: onequestion

I gave up taking other peoples word for it a very long time ago. It never seems to add up to the truth.


The fact that you've never heard of Robert Schoch indicates that you gave it up before you attempted it.

Harte



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 08:37 PM
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With all this talk of tori and the flower of life etc, you sound very much like another *cough* esteemed member: childofapoet.

In fact, unsurprisingly similar!
edit on 5-4-2016 by aorAki because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 11:42 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion

I was telling someone today... I think gravity itself is sound, a waveform.



Pretty tough for it to function across space, then. Since sound doesn't propagate in a vacuum. We can also make all sorts of sounds and it just doesn't seem to act like gravity.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 04:34 AM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: onequestion

I was telling someone today... I think gravity itself is sound, a waveform.



Pretty tough for it to function across space, then. Since sound doesn't propagate in a vacuum. We can also make all sorts of sounds and it just doesn't seem to act like gravity.

Sometimes sound can act like antigravity - if the one making the sound can't carry a tune.

Harte



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 08:09 AM
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WTH.

Look, I literally just came across this neo-assyrian relief and in the one-liner description of it on wikipedia it says...

"On this relief from Nimrud, a winged benevolent spirit blesses either the king or palace with a pine-cone. Walters Art Museum, Baltimore."

ITS A PINE CONE. lol. This relief was made almost 3000 years ago. Idk where the OP keeps going, but I hope he/she gets this, lol (if they don't already have this). If it weren't for ATS... and the OP, then I would've never noticed this little pine cone object or associated it with anything special, but maybe... there's something to this.

Tbh, I did not read the OP, sorry. Sorry!

Wikipedia source.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 05:32 PM
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originally posted by: geezlouise
WTH.

Look, I literally just came across this neo-assyrian relief and in the one-liner description of it on wikipedia it says...

"On this relief from Nimrud, a winged benevolent spirit blesses either the king or palace with a pine-cone. Walters Art Museum, Baltimore."

ITS A PINE CONE. lol. This relief was made almost 3000 years ago. Idk where the OP keeps going, but I hope he/she gets this, lol (if they don't already have this). If it weren't for ATS... and the OP, then I would've never noticed this little pine cone object or associated it with anything special, but maybe... there's something to this.

Tbh, I did not read the OP, sorry. Sorry!

Wikipedia source.


The cone has been interpreted
as a fir cone (Pinus brutia), as the male flower of
the date palm or as a clay object in imitation of
such. The bucket has been thought to have
been of metal or wicker, and to have contained
either water or pollen (see stylised tree and its
`rituals'). Written sources on the matter are
few, but it seems clear that the bucket and cone
were associated with purification, for they are
known respectively as banduddû (bucket) and,
significantly, mullitu (purifier), and figurines 11
of genies holding these attributes were among
the types placed within buildings for protection
from malevolent demons and disease (see
building rites and deposits; magic and
sorcery).

Black and Green, page 46.
It's referred to as a fir cone (possibly.) If you prefer, we could use the thing's actual name - Mullitu.

Today, we call this sort of thing an aspergillum.

Harte



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 06:58 PM
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a reply to: Harte

Someones been reading Jeremy Black I see





posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 07:41 PM
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originally posted by: Marduk
a reply to: Harte

Someones been reading Jeremy Black I see



Been awhile since I thumbed through that "dictionary."

Using it here to illustrate that there's no real consensus about the "pine cone" regarding what it actually is - manufactured, botanical, or whatever.

Just a thing to collect and sprinkle whatever is in the bucket, in other words.

Is Black out of date on this?

I'd hate for Black and Green to make me red (faced.)

Harte



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 09:04 PM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Marduk
a reply to: Harte

Someones been reading Jeremy Black I see



Been awhile since I thumbed through that "dictionary."

Using it here to illustrate that there's no real consensus about the "pine cone" regarding what it actually is - manufactured, botanical, or whatever.

Just a thing to collect and sprinkle whatever is in the bucket, in other words.

Is Black out of date on this?

I'd hate for Black and Green to make me red (faced.)

Harte

nice pun

The word Millilu means "purifier", which was also the name of the priest who wielded it. The pine cone is a symbol of fertility in many ancient cultures and the Mesopotamians liked to double up on their symbolism for extra effect. So the purifying priest, using a purifying fertility symbol, most often on the tree of life... fertility, fertility, fertility
I guess the meaning is pretty clear


edit on 6-4-2016 by Marduk because: (no reason given)

edit on 6-4-2016 by Marduk because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 10:10 PM
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Thanks guys! I been wondering about it. Still am actually, but you guys have certainly pointed me in the right direction.



posted on Apr, 9 2016 @ 05:44 PM
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originally posted by: Marduk

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Marduk
a reply to: Harte

Someones been reading Jeremy Black I see



Been awhile since I thumbed through that "dictionary."

Using it here to illustrate that there's no real consensus about the "pine cone" regarding what it actually is - manufactured, botanical, or whatever.

Just a thing to collect and sprinkle whatever is in the bucket, in other words.

Is Black out of date on this?

I'd hate for Black and Green to make me red (faced.)

Harte

nice pun

Did you see my other one in the other thread? link


originally posted by: MardukThe word Millilu means "purifier", which was also the name of the priest who wielded it.

The translation of the name was in the quote I provided, though not the fact that the same word means priest.

Not surprising though.

Harte




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