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I am an idiot probably, but what the heck. Tell me why this will not work.

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posted on Apr, 2 2016 @ 01:46 AM
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Maybe some of the smarter members could weigh in on this. I was just trying to figure out if this method could neutralize nuclear meltdowns or zap forest fires or make nuclear bombs ineffective:

Would having some way to use super cooled liquid hydrogen, helium or nitrogen be possible to neutralize nuclear threats or forest fires even? Couldn't we just freeze Fukushima or drop some strategically placed something that freezes it? Couldn't they do the same thing for out of control forest fires or even just regular fires in buildings or houses? Even if it was just a small area couldn't it stop the fire in its track? Could we drop something on a country that threatens to use nuclear weapons that would keep them from using them and in the process not blow up the country or cause a nuclear reaction?

I just wish there was some way to do something rather than just send people to their deaths in any instance.




posted on Apr, 2 2016 @ 01:52 AM
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a reply to: forthelove

Because hydrogen did so well as a fire retardant for the Hindenburg?




How Flammable is it?

Hydrogen is extremely flammable.

How Dangerous is it?

Hydrogen is more highly flammable at a much lower concentration than many other chemicals, so that even a small amount of hydrogen may catch fire or explode.



Hydrogen
edit on 2016/4/2 by Metallicus because: Eta



posted on Apr, 2 2016 @ 02:05 AM
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a reply to: forthelove

I will not claim to be a smarter member.

Cold doesn't negate heat. You can have a fire in the snow.

To put out a fire you need to either remove the fuel or the oxygen.

Not sure how Nuclear material heats up, so I wont comment there.

As for the 3 elements you list, I believe a high concentration of any of them is toxic to the fauna of this planet.



posted on Apr, 2 2016 @ 02:09 AM
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Because a nuclear chain reaction has nothing to do with temperature. Intense heat is just a side effect.

Forest fires? Sure..

Stopping a nuclear reaction isn't nearly as easy. It's a chain reaction. Nuclear material is inherently unstable.

Fusion vs. Fission makes a difference as well.

The only way I can think to stop it (a Fission reaction that has grown uncontrollable).. is to compress it. Bring it to absolute 0.. and somehow eliminate any and all forces from acting upon it including gravity... which is impossible on our planet

Fusion.. I don't even know



posted on Apr, 2 2016 @ 02:32 AM
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Despite the temperature, water is better to absorb heat,it has to do with motion of molecules and the formation of hidrogen bonds, heat is motion and the more ways you can move the more heat you can take, helium would be the worst of all, as it's just an atom only have 3 degrees of fredom nitrogen would be better, water even better.

Still if you pour a bunch of liquid helium at a chemical fire it would quench because you will be displazing the oxigen with it, not because you remove the heat, water does remove the heat.



posted on Apr, 2 2016 @ 02:42 AM
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a reply to: forthelove

You could drop liquid carbon dioxide on a small fire and put it out.I imagine you'd need a lot.

Use a larger amount and you'd kill everything in the area.Use enough to put out a forest fire and you'd kill everything in the country.

It's easier,cheaper and less deadly to use water.

Nuclear reactions,as has been said,are unstoppable unless you can cool everything down to zero degrees kelvin which is.....well...impossible.

If you could stop time,that'd work.😃



posted on Apr, 2 2016 @ 02:48 AM
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a reply to: forthelove

It's not in the realm of fantasy, that can actually happen. Everything you said. However, doing such things requires a LOT of energy. So far we are only good at producing it, not harnessing it.



posted on Apr, 2 2016 @ 03:08 AM
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Its all fun and games until someone mentions The Hindenburg.
edit on 2-4-2016 by JohnthePhilistine because: if i could



posted on Apr, 2 2016 @ 03:44 AM
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originally posted by: forthelove
Maybe some of the smarter members could weigh in on this. I was just trying to figure out if this method could neutralize nuclear meltdowns or zap forest fires or make nuclear bombs ineffective:

Would having some way to use super cooled liquid hydrogen, helium or nitrogen be possible to neutralize nuclear threats or forest fires even? Couldn't we just freeze Fukushima or drop some strategically placed something that freezes it? Couldn't they do the same thing for out of control forest fires or even just regular fires in buildings or houses? Even if it was just a small area couldn't it stop the fire in its track? Could we drop something on a country that threatens to use nuclear weapons that would keep them from using them and in the process not blow up the country or cause a nuclear reaction?

I just wish there was some way to do something rather than just send people to their deaths in any instance.


Despite the flammability of pure Hydrogen, liquid hydrogen is a superfluid.

Superfluids are very hard to contain because they an flow out between the molecules of other materials.

One way for you to envision things is that the Hydrogen atom is absolutely the smallest atom that exists (a single proton, a single neutron and a single electron). Being so small, in its H2 molecular form, it can easily fit between the gaps in other molecules and just simply sweats out through every other material which we might make a container out of.

edit on 2/4/2016 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 2 2016 @ 06:15 AM
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originally posted by: chr0naut
One way for you to envision things is that the Hydrogen atom is absolutely the smallest atom that exists (a single proton, a single neutron and a single electron).

Nitpicky ... I know. Sorry.



posted on Apr, 2 2016 @ 07:07 AM
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a reply to: Ericthedoubter

Carbon dioxide has no liquid state, it is only a solid or a gas.



posted on Apr, 2 2016 @ 07:20 AM
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a reply to: chr0naut




Being so small, in its H2 molecular form, it can easily fit between the gaps in other molecules and just simply sweats out through every other material which we might make a container out of.


Yes, it does...it causes embrittlement of the container too.

One way to safely store hydrogen is sequestered in powdered hydrides. The hydrides prevent leakage and also retard combustion.


I think Bob Lazar (of area 51 fame / infamy) experimented with this and proposed it as a way to drive a Hydrogen vehicle safely.

ETA: Yep, it was Bob...here's a link to a video explaining all about safely storing Hydrogen in Hydrides...there's a catch though. The US government has restricted the sale or supply of hydrides..not because they are inherently dangerous, or illegal to own or use, they're not...but because coincidentally, hydrides are used in the manufacture of nuclear weapons.

Anyway...here's a link to a video clip of Bob explaining what's what.

Bob Lazar Hydride Hydrogen storage and car


edit on 2 4 2016 by MysterX because: added info



posted on Apr, 2 2016 @ 08:14 AM
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a reply to: Jinn82

Oh,thanks...I didn't know that.

Coincidentally,I don't know why it hasn't.😃



posted on Apr, 2 2016 @ 08:56 AM
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edit on 9201630090420169 by Gothmog because: my bad



posted on Apr, 2 2016 @ 11:06 AM
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Nitrogen can put out a fire, but under the right conditions, it will cause an explosion.

The only way to stop a nuke is to have something absorb or deflect the energy released. Excessive energy overwhelms the bonds and things disintegrate or explode depending on the type ofthe bond broken. Sometimes things just melt.

Creating something that would deflect it like a force field on a metal structure would only work so long before the energy would backfeed into the generation unit and explode.



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 02:52 PM
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originally posted by: Snarl

originally posted by: chr0naut
One way for you to envision things is that the Hydrogen atom is absolutely the smallest atom that exists (a single proton, a single neutron and a single electron).

Nitpicky ... I know. Sorry.


You are right, It is the Deuterium isotope of Hydrogen that contains a neutron but Deuterium only exists in about 0.01% of naturally occurring Hydrogen.

The most abundant isotope of Hydrogen (Protium) has no neutrons.

For Balance, though, the Tritium isotope of Hydrogen (which is exceptionally rare in nature) has two neutrons.

I stand corrected!




posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 03:05 PM
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originally posted by: MysterX
a reply to: chr0naut




Being so small, in its H2 molecular form, it can easily fit between the gaps in other molecules and just simply sweats out through every other material which we might make a container out of.


Yes, it does...it causes embrittlement of the container too.

One way to safely store hydrogen is sequestered in powdered hydrides. The hydrides prevent leakage and also retard combustion.


I think Bob Lazar (of area 51 fame / infamy) experimented with this and proposed it as a way to drive a Hydrogen vehicle safely.

ETA: Yep, it was Bob...here's a link to a video explaining all about safely storing Hydrogen in Hydrides...there's a catch though. The US government has restricted the sale or supply of hydrides..not because they are inherently dangerous, or illegal to own or use, they're not...but because coincidentally, hydrides are used in the manufacture of nuclear weapons.

Anyway...here's a link to a video clip of Bob explaining what's what.

Bob Lazar Hydride Hydrogen storage and car



Yes, the US government wants to prevent H-bomb proliferation and so legislated against Li6 sale & purchase but good 'ol Bob has gone & provided the recipe.



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