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Ancient God discovered in ruined temple

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posted on Mar, 30 2016 @ 02:57 PM
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a reply to: SLAYER69

This reminded me of something I came across while researching my family origins

There is a valley where we originate from within the providence of northern Spain with some of the oldest remains of ancient religions.

One such phallic monument has stood the test of time, and the onslaught of Christianity as well as modern development around it.

The town where it is located in is remote and so has been preserved to a high degree.

"el moyón de la corralá"





It has been studied and been proven to have been moved from its original location. The inscriptions are pretty detailed (though worn out) and show a high degree if similarity with the ones shown in the OP. Most of this monolith is still underground, but what can be seen shows a sort of marker for ancient pilgrimage of established trade routes. I think allot was based off nomadic life and its "safe passage" through friendly territories.

The curious part, the place where it is thought to have been originally located, which is not very far from the town where it is currently found in, has a cave. In this cave a shepherd found many strange bronze objects. They were removed around the 15th century and I think were donated to the church.

Markers for sacred sites? A place of tribute for the gods or nature itself?

It is IMO a remnant of ancient spiritual worship much like the find in the OP.

The fecund worship of the old world had a female and male aspect (originally female centered). It was originally not centered around a deity or deities IMO, but was more like pan-worship.

Just thought I would throw this in here.

Sorry if it is a tangent. I just figured I would say why I agree with the notion of a common ancient form of worship across Europe, as far as Proto Europeans were concerned, that was replaced by the practices of indo-Europeans and their middle eastern inspired spiritual beliefs.

GODs were a thing of this influx, whereas a universality of nature and existence through the "dream world" was the original religion of prehistoric people. Similar to Australian aborigines

EDIT TO ADD:
I forgot to mention another oddity of this slab. There is an ancient "Greek" styled cross in one of the sections partially still buried. Sign of a source or influence in the area? A "so and so was here" type inscription from an ancient Greek?

edit on 3 30 2016 by tadaman because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 30 2016 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: SLAYER69

Yeah, I've ranted this opinion a few times on different threads--hell, probably on one of yours. I just don't have the time to research exactly how many of these types of claims turn out to be duds.

If Geraldo Rivera was an archaeologist, though, these are the types of claims that he'd make.

Every. Time.



posted on Mar, 30 2016 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

You wont need many examples just two or three. I have a few of my own that I'd add if you wrote such a thread. I've thought about writing one along those lines over the years. But, something about where this one was found and the manner in which it was placed seems to imply that they may be onto something.

If an older then defunct deity was to be replaced the symbolism alone by it being buried beneath the newer beliefs/god replacement isn't unheard of in such cases would demonstrate to the believers that the newer/replacement was dominant.

There could have even been some sort of ceremony as it was placed to this end. I know, nothing but conjecture on my part.



posted on Mar, 30 2016 @ 05:13 PM
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originally posted by: MoreInterior
Guys. It's not English. Stop being doofuses trying to read it. About a quarter of the letters in the Etruscan alphabet look similar to "F."

I'm with you on this one.

It obviously says "FI" and is therefore relating a version of some ancient giant's narrative.

Harte



posted on Mar, 30 2016 @ 06:01 PM
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a reply to: errorcode

I worry that in a thousand years from now there will be nobody alive to dig us up. Or if there are, wouldn't care.



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 09:56 AM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

Do you think it has something to do that, to this day, anything almost can and will grab more attention if that word comes along....?
Let's say they didn't mention it...would it grab the attention they would want to continue? Or just like you fear....it all comes down to quick name callings at this point...and well, always seems to point upwards....JESUS lives......!!!



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 05:01 PM
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originally posted by: Terminal1
a reply to: errorcode

I worry that in a thousand years from now there will be nobody alive to dig us up. Or if there are, wouldn't care.


They won't need to, we will all still be on youtube



posted on Apr, 4 2016 @ 08:47 AM
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a reply to: eldemie

I'm pretty sure that it does scream for more attention, but I also think that it is more of just a hopeful laziness on behalf of the archaeologists more than anything else. I think the two work well together, and it probably makes it easier to secure funding when you spin your discoveries to be about ancient religion and mythology, because really, there's not much money to be made from discovering a farmer's list of crop yields for the year as there is in discovering new (or more) evidence of a religion about which there is minimal information.

Generally, in modern science, it seems like sensationalism and money are pretty heavy motivators--that could be a cynical misinterpretation on my behalf, but it really does feel like archaeology and other sciences (climate science, I'm looking at you) has all been about securing future funding more than relaying accurate and correct information.

But, I also see a lack of critical thinking taking place, and instead of really diving deep into the subject to figure it out, the easiest explanation is used and then they move on to something else.


edit on 4-4-2016 by SlapMonkey because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2016 @ 12:34 AM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

I like the words....all of them.
Hopeful laziness....and critical thinking



posted on Apr, 12 2016 @ 12:58 AM
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a reply to: SLAYER69

My first instinct is to remember Motel of the Mysteries by David Macaulay -- a work of hilarious if acid commentary that skewers much that is wrong with archeology.

My second thought is that so little is known of the Etruscans that it is always remarkable to find something of their era. If this is an Etruscan name it would be very difficult to decipher even if it were plainly written. I hope they are successful in determining its meaning.



posted on Apr, 13 2016 @ 03:30 AM
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a reply to: Guyfriday

Ok so couple of problems with those comments of yours:

1: Runes are Germanic not Celtic.
2: 2500 years ago is not the right time period for Runes (to early)
And
3: Etruscans were not as accepting of other cultures as Rome was



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