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HUD Bringing Low-Income Housing To Affluent Baltimore Suburbs

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posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 02:05 PM
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And yet, when the process is worked in reverse and a bunch of hipsters move into a formerly urban area and reverse the decay and raise property values and revitalize the area, they complain about it.




posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 02:20 PM
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This will only affect the working class areas, they will end up looking like slumps at the end, the affluent areas will never be touch by this type of "programs" as no even the government subsidies can afford the properties.

I have seen this done around my neck of the woods, after it was done the working class tax payers just moved on to other areas, what was left behind is now nothing but low income neighborhoods, in the beginning you could get a nice home for lest money, but while you were a home owner your neighbor was not, so you will get one nice looking house next to one that was unkept.

Now my own neighborhood after the 2008 has been also going down the hill, now, most of the houses around ours are nothing but rentals and the owners will take anybody regardless as long as the house is rented.

Usually you get no only one family per house but one that shares the house with several families.

Sometimes the say so about you can leave the ghetto but can not get the ghetto out of you comes to mind.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 03:24 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6
a reply to: Nyiah

I'm amazed your neighborhood hasn't been lambasted by the left for it's obvious gentrification.

Are you speaking in terms of visual gentrification, or attitude? If you mean visually, there's been no new home or commercial building in this neighborhood for a long time, most of these houses are around 100 years old (ours is one of the most recently built, 70 years ago) The commercial buildings are equally as old. They may have had a paint job, but they're original, all of them.

If you meant more of gentrification via attitude changes in the neighbors, yeah, I . . guess? Most of these people have been here decades. Only 2 people on our specific street have moved in in the last decade (ourselves, and the folks across the street) To me, that shows it's absolutely been a community effort to keep the neighborhood respectable long-term like this.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 03:27 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah

Often, when you have a neighborhood that was run down, had a lot of poverty and hovels, and people come into the neighborhood with the idea of cleaning things up, repairing the run down homes, taking some pride in the neighborhood, property values increase accordingly. This causes some people to cry about gentrification because, suddenly, the people originally responsible for running the neighborhood into the ground find themselves priced out of the neighborhood.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

Ah, ok, I get what you mean, thanks for clarifying. To be honest, I haven't heard any complaints about housing costs, but it's been turned around for a lot longer than we've been living here. If anyone did complain about prices going up, it was a long time ago now.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 05:05 PM
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It will cause the existing people to move. prices drop, more people move, prices drop, eventually drop low enough where poor people can afford them.

people who can afford to move do. parents do not like it when the school starts becoming a dangerous place and standards plummet.

it's one thing to throw a couple disadvantaged children into a school system where it will rub off, but when a large percentage comes it does not work out as so.

forced busing has similar effects, I've seen suburb schools get trashed by the policy. It is sad but this is not a solution.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 06:26 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah

We've seen it in and around Kansas City where the downtown area got gentrified and lot of loft properties got built in converted warehouse and storage buildings that weren't being used for anything. Suddenly, a bunch of younger people moved in who wanted to live closer to the work areas in the downtown, so that area got revitalized and the people who lived in the area got pushed out.

Of course, the younger people don't have kids usually, or they have kids who are too young to go to school. They move out of the lofts by the time they need schools, so the school district doesn't have any help from this, just the downtown urban district.

And the people who get pushed out complain that there are no cheap enough places for them to go because a couple housing projects got demolished in the process, but they were crumbling and next to uninhabitable.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 11:17 PM
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it never worked before and it won`t work now,remember the white flight from the cities? it will happen again from the suburbs. it`s like peeing in your lemonade,it won`t make the pee taste better it will just make the lemonade taste worse.
Baltimore county use to be a really nice suburb but it slowly went downhill by now it probably won`t matter if they do dump a bunch of welfare ghetto rats there,all the sensible folks left there years ago.



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