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HUD Bringing Low-Income Housing To Affluent Baltimore Suburbs

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posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 03:13 AM
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Oh I know all you poor hating people are going to love this. How dare them move poor people into nice neighborhoods freaking communist. Guess the situation has been so bad in the hood that they gotta take drastic measures try and help the problem of no jobs or low paying jobs and crappy schools in dangerous neighborhoods.

Anyway...

source


he Department of Housing and Urban Development last week announced a “landmark” settlement agreement with Baltimore County that will serve as a catalyst to “promote housing mobility” and “address residential segregation.”


Does this have something to do with relaxing relations with Cuba, and Obama saying that communism is close to capitalism and that's it's ok to use ideas from socialism and capitalism if the idea works?

This is getting so weird it's cartoonish.




posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 04:38 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

No, it has nothing to do with relations with Cuba.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 04:38 AM
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Re-read your post...........you're better than that.

When you're done, read this: www.baltimoresun.com...

Now get some coffee, sober up and don't post drunk again.


BTW, the term "higher opportunity areas" that the article is using probably refers to how most cities allocate funding to public schools through property taxes. The higher the property tax (the more houses are worth) in a district, the more funding the schools get. That translates to better facilities, teachers, computers, etc.......which translate into better opportunities for the students.

www6.luc.edu...



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 04:44 AM
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a reply to: Taupin Desciple

I think it's a good idea.

Lol

Notice the drastic difference between paragraphsz
edit on 3/29/2016 by onequestion because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 05:43 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

Without reading the source (guilty) I remember this being an initiative about a year or so ago. They want to mix people from all classes and races all together.

Fine... Start in DC, Martha's Vineyard, etc and we can test this policy. It is a bad idea.. On the surface it sounds good but the variable being the type of people you mix up you are literally creating a powder keg.

This isn't working in the Middle East with nation building and trying to get those different types of people to live together. The same will apply here in my opinion.

Sorry if my nonprefaced post is off topic.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 06:54 AM
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originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: Taupin Desciple

I think it's a good idea.

Lol



So do I, but it seems to be a good idea by default. Meaning, what other option is there to level the playing field? Get the rich good-ole-boys club to see the error of their ways and distribute the wealth on their own? Excuse the pun, but that would be rich. Baltimore is one of the oldest cities in America, and there they are.....playing that game. I don't think HUD had much of a choice here. Remember the riots? Remember the frustration that bore those riots out? It wasn't just police brutality, trust me. It seems to me that the leaders in those disadvantaged neighborhoods really were bending the ears of the officials..........and the officials actually listened.

Maybe there's a changing of the guard in Baltimore?



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 07:14 AM
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I grew up in Detroit. I've experienced how this type of policy will work out. Those nice neighborhoods will look like the ones south of the 8 mile Detroit border (now north as well), they were nice once too. Eminem's 8 mile was a joke, you really need to live and work around there to know what it is really all about. Those disadvantaged "poor people" bring their problems with them where ever they end up. Give it ten years or less, but of course they will blame it on white privilege and white flight and how the man be holding them down still.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 07:22 AM
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They're already doing this in Chicago.
Some with zero income and a housing voucher can actually get a $4,000/mo hi rise apartment.
You hear the same clap trap about "opportunity areas" which is nonsense because it isn't location that determines one's future but their life choices and commitment to seeing them through.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 07:52 AM
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originally posted by: Asktheanimals
.......it isn't location that determines one's future but their life choices and commitment to seeing them through.


I believe it's both. People with morals and ethics take take the opportunities afforded them by living in areas where the education is good, and push their children in the right direction. People without morals and ethics will simply piss on the opportunity.

Not everyone in the ghettos of America are bad people.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 08:01 AM
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I have a house that many friends thought was in the ghetto... it was just an older sub-division houses were well maintained, yards were well maintained... lower middle class blue collar workers.

Then I saw the neighborhoods that had HUD forcing things into them... property values plummeted, partly because of panic over "poor" people and partly because a fair percentage of the people HUD moves in these projects are not hard working people looking for a hand up.

ON the positive side of things my homes value has gone up since I bought it 9 years ago.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 08:07 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

Uh, well, you realize, this is nothing new. HUD has been doing this since the first Clinton administration when Cisneros was appointed the HUD director. The real problem comes in when the huge Apt. complexes are built, typically near major thorough fares and the properties are granted a property tax variance. So they move in 1000 more school students but the Apt.'s dwellers pay nothing in property tax.

All in all its probably a good thing because it mitigates against ghettoization which has been the big problem in Europe. However, it does cause weird distortions in the Real Estate market and real property valuations. It has caused there to be no real recovery in the Housing market. Sales of existing homes fell 7% last month alone with the biggest decline being in the north east corridor where sales dipped 17%.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 09:49 AM
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It won't work.

There are huge cultural differences between the lower incomes and middle/upper classes nowadays. The theory is that the middle class/upper class values will rub off on the lower income folks, but that really isn' t what happens. Usually, there is a culture clash. The middle class gets fed up and will move and the neighborhood goes from being a stable community to just another ghetto.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 09:50 AM
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Good idea if you ask me.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 10:08 AM
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originally posted by: Irishhaf
I have a house that many friends thought was in the ghetto... it was just an older sub-division houses were well maintained, yards were well maintained... lower middle class blue collar workers.

Then I saw the neighborhoods that had HUD forcing things into them... property values plummeted, partly because of panic over "poor" people and partly because a fair percentage of the people HUD moves in these projects are not hard working people looking for a hand up.

ON the positive side of things my homes value has gone up since I bought it 9 years ago.

According to locals, the neighborhood I currently live in was a ghetto 15-20 years ago. One person my husband works with who used to live a few blocks away all that time ago was horrified when he told them where we live, assuming it was still a gangbanger rathole. I've had a pretty hard time believing it was anything less than what it is now (which I'd call idyllic & safe AF) The clean-up was attributed to the neighbors working hand in hand with the po-po's to turn the neighborhood around, and boy, did they.

The thing is, it was mixed income back then, and is mixed income now as well. There's still HUD rentals here, they're not dumps occupied by freeloaders, there's no gangs, there's no crime (outside of the odd speeder getting pulled over on the main road, we really have NO crime)

Housing values vary, but suffice it to say, it's not lacking around here in terms of value.The HUD qualified homes didn't dent anything.
edit on 3/29/2016 by Nyiah because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 10:26 AM
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originally posted by: Nyiah

originally posted by: Irishhaf
I have a house that many friends thought was in the ghetto... it was just an older sub-division houses were well maintained, yards were well maintained... lower middle class blue collar workers.

Then I saw the neighborhoods that had HUD forcing things into them... property values plummeted, partly because of panic over "poor" people and partly because a fair percentage of the people HUD moves in these projects are not hard working people looking for a hand up.

ON the positive side of things my homes value has gone up since I bought it 9 years ago.

According to locals, the neighborhood I currently live in was a ghetto 15-20 years ago. One person my husband works with who used to live a few blocks away all that time ago was horrified when he told them where we live, assuming it was still a gangbanger rathole. I've had a pretty hard time believing it was anything less than what it is now (which I'd call idyllic & safe AF) The clean-up was attributed to the neighbors working hand in hand with the po-po's to turn the neighborhood around, and boy, did they.

The thing is, it was mixed income back then, and is mixed income now as well. There's still HUD rentals here, they're not dumps occupied by freeloaders, there's no gangs, there's no crime (outside of the odd speeder getting pulled over on the main road, we really have NO crime)

Housing values vary, but suffice it to say, it's not lacking around here in terms of value.The HUD qualified homes didn't dent anything.


I saw the opposite. The neighborhood my parents grew up in was a solid lower middle class area. People worked and took care of their homes and families. Yards were always cut and maintained. Trash picked up. Low crime. Apartment complexes and then section 8 vouchers started moving in and now the area is a straight up ghetto. Crackheads everywhere. Feral kids running around. Gangs. The entire demographics of the area flipped over about 50 years with most of the damage occurring within the past 30 years.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 10:30 AM
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a reply to: Nyiah

I fully agree that there are people that get help through these programs and use them to get out of the worst parts of the cities... people that worked their butts off to improve their lives no doubt, and a little help from the fed at the right time made the difference.

My problem is always directed at those that expect to be given everything with little effort, that do nothing but take advantage of the system.

Oh and no I have no idea how to fix it so the free loaders stop screwing it up for the good hard working people.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 01:49 PM
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originally posted by: Irishhaf
a reply to: Nyiah

I fully agree that there are people that get help through these programs and use them to get out of the worst parts of the cities... people that worked their butts off to improve their lives no doubt, and a little help from the fed at the right time made the difference.

My problem is always directed at those that expect to be given everything with little effort, that do nothing but take advantage of the system.

Oh and no I have no idea how to fix it so the free loaders stop screwing it up for the good hard working people.

Oh I agree, there's always going to be that mooch out there looking for everything on a silver platter. Personally, I'd like to see the HUD program offered under more strict conditions to those who truly need it as a way out of hell. Such as maintaining no run-ins with the law or zero-tolerance arrest policy (well, depending on arrest reasons. simple battery for defending yourself? It happens, & is not really a reason to get the boot) Pre-secured full-time job or apprenticeship in the area desired & retained for a predetermined number of years, housing assistance lost if the job's not retained (determining whether or not a firing was your fault or work's prerogative could be iffy, though)

The elderly & medically needy don't really need to buck up in this sense, but the able-bodied could stand the belt tightened a little on criteria to meet. It just makes sense in the long-term to have more rigorous criteria to weed out those not committed to overall betterment.

All & all, HUD's a good program. It kept a roof over my late grandmother's head for many years. Her HUD apartment complex also didn't drag down the surrounding neighborhood home values, either. Then again, it was full of elderly & disabled people who weren't going to eff anything up for the affordable rent.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

The problem is those people often bring the crappy schools and dangerous neighborhoods with them, the really wealthy move out, and the middle class are the ones stuck watching their once beautiful neighborhood they worked their ass off to move into go straight down the crapper.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 01:56 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah

I'm amazed your neighborhood hasn't been lambasted by the left for it's obvious gentrification.



posted on Mar, 29 2016 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

No. This has been in the works for longer than Cuba.



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