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Kentucky Woman Arrested for Eavesdropping on a Caregiver for her Daughter

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posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:09 PM
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Bobbi Carmicle says she started worrying about her daughter’s well being after she started throwing temper tantrums when being sent to a caregiver.

Carmicle says that is when she got a device to put in her daughter’s backpack to monitor her interactions.

Her daughter is 11-years-old and a 4th grade student with special needs. Carmicle put the voice activated recording device in her daughter’s backpack.



"I caught her leaving my daughter in the car by herself. I've caught her screaming at my daughter to shove toilet paper into a garbage can, screaming over her. No mention of washing her hands after touching disgusting toilet paper,” said Carmicle.


Russell Co. Woman Facing Jail Time After Being Accused Of Eavesdropping


This is pure insanity. A mother places an audio recording device in her daughters backpack to listen in on what's essentially a babysitter. She catches abusive action and instead of the authorities investigating the child's caregiver, they arrest the mother for eavesdropping. Kentucky is a "one party consent" state. The eleven year old daughter knew the device was there and asked her mother to place the device in her backpack. There were absolutely zero grounds for the mother to be charged with felony eavesdropping.

Depending the outcome of this case, it could set a huge precedent. What might be next? Will a successful prosecution help protect caregivers from misconduct? Will it stop parents from placing video monitors in their homes? In my opinion this mother should be applauded for paying attention to the signs her daughter was giving that she was in an abusive situation.


edit on 3/28/2016 by EternalSolace because: Fixed URL




posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:13 PM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

Link said access denied...

Who knew there was a felony for eavesdropping. But, it's Kentucky.



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:18 PM
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originally posted by: lovebeck
a reply to: EternalSolace

Link said access denied...

Who knew there was a felony for eavesdropping. But, it's Kentucky.


Thanks, I've fixed the link!



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:19 PM
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That is crazy!! No idea what has happened to people, the courts etc... but people are losing their minds!

Here is a working link: Woman facing jail time



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:20 PM
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edit on 28-3-2016 by NarcolepticBuddha because: meh I've stopped making sense today. Time to log out


What a joke. But it's not funny. This bizarre world is bringing me down!

edit on 28-3-2016 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:22 PM
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I think the better (and legal) choice would have been to talk with her daughter more about possible issues with the care giver, speak directly to the caregiver, and then find some one else to watch the child. If my children had given me cause to doubt the quality of care they were receiving I would have very quickly resolved the matter directly.



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:24 PM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

"Monkey say, but Don't do"

It's a 1-way street, we're not allowed to use intel. like that to PROTECT ourselves, but they will strip all of our privacy rights away under the guise of "SECURITY" and we're just stuck with it.

Bullsh*t



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:26 PM
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a reply to: quercusrex

That would be an option as well. Everyone has different methods of parenting. However, there was nothing illegal with how she went about getting the evidence. It's also the best method, in my opinion, of ensuring an abusive caregiver isn't in the position to harm anyone else in the future.
edit on 3/28/2016 by EternalSolace because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:29 PM
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originally posted by: EternalSolace

originally posted by: lovebeck
a reply to: EternalSolace

Link said access denied...

Who knew there was a felony for eavesdropping. But, it's Kentucky.


Thanks, I've fixed the link!


Just read it. What a waste of taxpayers money. Kentucky has been hard hit with the heroin epidemic...maybe concentrate on that rather than a woman who didn't even break the law!

Smdh!!!



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:32 PM
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Just wondering? Would a "nanny" cam in say a teddy bear be outlawed in Kentucky also?



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:32 PM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

Yes, it is against the law in Kentucky. I am curious to see how the case plays out.

I found it interesting that after she asked her daughter if there was a problem the mother took the time to order a recording device online and then sent it with her daughter. Why not just fix the issue right then?



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: budzilla

Not if at least one member of the conversation is aware of the recording. The law is pretty up front and is widely enforced in several states.



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:37 PM
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Perhaps the dilemma might rest in the device used, had it been a video and audio I don't think the authorities would have had much to say.
Why someone got arrested is pretty too much to the letter of the law anyway.



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: quercusrex

It's not.

KRS 526.010


526.010 Definition.
The following definition applies in this chapter, unless the context otherwise requires:
"Eavesdrop" means to overhear, record, amplify or transmit any part of a wire or
oral communication of others without the consent of at least one (1) party thereto by
means of any electronic, mechanical or other device.


Her daughter was a consenting party making the whole situation legal.

I do see your point though. I'd have confronted the caregiver as soon as possible as well. But it's highly doubtful that a someone is going to give themselves up as being abusive. That said, her daughter is special needs and while the article doesn't say what that condition is, it might play a part in why she needed to record what was going on.



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:40 PM
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Geez ... Really???

You know something is wrong ... and yet you send your kid back into harm's way to get a recording.

Damned dumbest stunt I've ever heard of!! Go get a new babysitter FCOL!! You know something's wrong. Are you Jonesin' for a Darwin Award with your child as the lead actor. FFS

She deserved to be charged. My 2¢ ...



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:41 PM
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If there is one thing the masters cannot stand
It is when you do, even one time, as they do
All of the time, and present the effort in expectation
Of an equitable outcome.

-Saint Nixon


# 607



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:43 PM
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LOL> gubment surveils everyone, prying into every corner of their lives. But don't you do it or else.



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:43 PM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

Her daughter is 11 years old and not legally allowed to consent to anything.



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:47 PM
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Obviously people who posted have not ever been put under surveillance before. It's creepy and scary.

If the child was able to consent to recording, I'm sure she could have at least talked about any verbal abuse. Why wouldn't she just talk to the child?

Plus think about this "verbal abuse" - it sounds like the mother is trying to put a spin on it. If a kid has a bunch of dirty toilet paper in their hand, it's not abuse to tell them in a loud voice to toss the paper in the garbage - a loud tone would be a normal reaction. As for leaving her alone in the car, I'm wondering if that was a spin too. Notice she didn't say how far and how long - maybe it was 10 feet into a gas station to pay?



If she was so concerned about her child, why didn't she tell the babysitter she was going to record conversations? It wouldn't have "caught" the babysitter but certainly prevented any future abuse. The goal should be prevention not trying to catch someone.

My guess is there was some nosy mother who got caught recording and now has to put a spin on it by saying she caught abuse and her daughter consented.


edit on March 28th 2016 by Daughter2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 07:47 PM
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originally posted by: quercusrex
a reply to: EternalSolace

Her daughter is 11 years old and not legally allowed to consent to anything.


Ah, okay. I see your angle on it now. I wonder if there's case law somewhere that would support the mother's case. I'm going to do some digging to see if I can find any precident.



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