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The Largest Demolition Derby On The Planet

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posted on Jan, 12 2005 @ 09:40 AM
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A massive iceberg is about to collide with a floating glacier near Antarctica. They describe it as a "clash of the titans".


From: NASA: Slow-Motion Collision Near McMurdo Imminent

It is an event so large that the best seat in the house is in space: a massive iceberg is on a collision course with a floating glacier near the McMurdo Research Station in Antarctica. NASA satellites have witnessed the 100-mile-long B-15A iceberg moving steadily towards the Drygalski Ice Tongue. Though the iceberg's pace has slowed in recent days, NASA scientists expect a collision to occur no later than January 15, 2005.

"It's a clash of the titans, a radical and uncommon event," says Robert Bindshadler, a researcher at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and if the two giant slabs of ice collide, we could see one of the best demolition derbies on the planet. "Even a 'tap' from a giant can be powerful. It will certainly be a blow far larger than anything else the ice tongue has ever experienced," says Bindshadler.

When the iceberg and the ice tongue collide, the impact will likely "dent their bumpers," says Bindshadler. The edges could crumple and ice could pile or drift into the Ross Sea. But if the B-15A iceberg picks up enough speed before the two collide, the results could be more spectacular. The Drygalski Ice Tongue could break off.

Click the link for the full article...




posted on Jan, 12 2005 @ 09:31 PM
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I'm curious to see the outcome of this and how it will impact the penguin population.
Also, I seem to remember that some of the research stations were having problems because of this berg, maybe supply issues?

Hellmutt, I hope you can keep us posted??



posted on Jan, 12 2005 @ 09:49 PM
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I'm not sure if this has been posted on this site before this but I know that this is pretty old. I heard about this 4 weeks ago.



posted on Jan, 13 2005 @ 12:24 AM
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Originally posted by theghost88
I'm not sure if this has been posted on this site before this but I know that this is pretty old. I heard about this 4 weeks ago.

Maybe, but this article say they expect the collision to take place on Saturday...



posted on Jan, 13 2005 @ 12:27 AM
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Originally posted by DontTreadOnMe
I'm curious to see the outcome of this and how it will impact the penguin population.
Also, I seem to remember that some of the research stations were having problems because of this berg, maybe supply issues?

Hellmutt, I hope you can keep us posted??

ATS: Huge Iceberg Threatens Antarctic Penguins



posted on Jan, 17 2005 @ 09:59 AM
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The collision didn´t occure on Saturday anyway. Then they expected it might collide today. I don´t know if it happened today...


From: Scientists Watch for Antarctic Iceberg Collision

"There is no guarantee there will be any collision, or it could be catastrophic in terms of having quite big consequences"

Scientists were now eagerly watching to see what would happen if the iceberg and glacier collide.

"This is the biggest thing we've seen for a while"



posted on Jan, 17 2005 @ 10:03 AM
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I'd love to see a video of them crashing together..



posted on Jan, 17 2005 @ 05:13 PM
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so did it crash yet?

I'm curious, could this cause earthquakes in the area or tidal waves or surges? What if a huge piece breaks off in the impact, wouldn't sea levels rise?



posted on Jan, 17 2005 @ 06:23 PM
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Originally posted by worldwatcher
so did it crash yet?

I'm curious, could this cause earthquakes in the area or tidal waves or surges? What if a huge piece breaks off in the impact, wouldn't sea levels rise?

Good questions...

From: MSNBC: Scientists watch for iceberg collision


Josh Landis / AFP - Getty Images

The massive B-15A iceberg is about the size of Long Island, N.Y., and contains enough drinking water to supply the world for several months.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


[edit on 2006/4/25 by Hellmutt]



posted on Jan, 17 2005 @ 06:32 PM
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This might be a good page to keep oneself updated:

BBC: Giant ice slabs set for collision

"Two giant slabs of ice are about to hit each other in Antarctica, possibly with spectacular results, say Nasa experts."

NASA´s page:
NASA - Get Ready for the Largest Demolition Derby on the Planet

[edit on 2005/1/17 by Hellmutt]



posted on Jan, 18 2005 @ 06:46 PM
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Seems like they might have some problems with their satellites down there...

www.abovetopsecret.com...
(Loss of Satellite Cuts Antarctic and Pacific Communications)



posted on Jan, 18 2005 @ 06:51 PM
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Wow, check it out. From NASA's site. Cracks everywhere...


Click picture for high resolution picture...

It looks like a warship on fire. They should have named that iceberg "Glowworm"...

[edit on 2006/4/25 by Hellmutt]



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 09:17 AM
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It appears B15A may have been grounded. So, the drama continues.


Instead B15A appears to have grounded on a submarine shoal when it was just 2.5 miles from the glacier. Continued observations of the area on the eve of what is expected to be renewed iceberg movements have shown a sudden break up sea ice around the iceberg.

www.spacedaily.com...



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 06:49 PM
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Check out this "movie" from NASA's page:
www.nasa.gov... (about 5 MB)



[edit on 2006/4/25 by Hellmutt]



posted on Jan, 23 2005 @ 07:52 AM
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UPDATE!!

Interesting story about the penguins who have been stranded.
No one knows what B-15A will do next. I was happy to see this is not impacting the entire penguin population in the area.


In total, Cockrem estimates that about 50,000 breeding pairs at two rookeries are affected. But, he points out, that's less than 2 per cent of the adult Adelie population of more than five million penguins.

"People have asked: `Should we be doing something about it? Should we be helping the penguins?'

"As a penguin biologist, I would say no, we certainly shouldn't." he says. "We're observers of natural phenomenon."

a long waddle before dinner



posted on Jan, 23 2005 @ 08:06 AM
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demolition ice burgs hmm sounds very cool and iteresting it could becomne a sport
with daily events



posted on Jan, 23 2005 @ 10:27 AM
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from the animation you have shown it looks like that tongue is gonna get ripped right off.

Tahlen



posted on Jan, 23 2005 @ 10:55 AM
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For the latest satellite pictures, click the picture :


MODIS Rapid Response System - RossSea Subsets


[edit on 2006/4/25 by Hellmutt]


E_T

posted on Jan, 23 2005 @ 12:41 PM
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Originally posted by worldwatcher
I'm curious, could this cause earthquakes in the area or tidal waves or surges? What if a huge piece breaks off in the impact, wouldn't sea levels rise?
It's already displacing amount of water weighting as much as it, breaking it to smaller pieces won't change that.
BTW its mass is big, remember that ~9/10 of iceberg lies under surface.

And neither it is connected to earth's crust.
Only melting of whole continental glacier would cause earthquakes because of release from stress caused by kilometers thick layer of ice... and neither those would be big.
In fact crust is still rising few millimeters/year in here where I live, in some parts of western Finland rising is ~1cm/year.
(this rising is observable in big part of Fennoscandia)



posted on Jan, 23 2005 @ 12:49 PM
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Originally posted by DontTreadOnMe
I'm curious to see the outcome of this and how it will impact the penguin population.


Hopefully they will be smart enough to avoid the impact.
I would like a seat on the iceberg.



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