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BLM madness, confront Trump supporter. Backfires.

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(post by Darmok removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)

posted on Mar, 24 2016 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: tadaman

Funny how many people forget that Carson endorsed Trump, or that His daughter and Grand Children are Jewish... I have a theory, I think people just don't like him for any one of combination of the following.

1. He is not a politician
2. He speaks his mind and don't care who likes it
3. He is rich and that makes people jealous

There is a meme that spells it out pretty well, If the Establishment doesn't like them, if Republicans don't like them, if Democrats don't like them, maybe you found your guy.

The whole system needs a reboot, maybe he is the guy to press that button.

#Trump 2016



posted on Mar, 24 2016 @ 03:09 PM
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Check this out.

Cops are heavily unionized.

They mostly vote for the left.

BLM is also left.

So in a nutshell shell BLM hates themselves because they both vote the same way.



posted on Mar, 24 2016 @ 06:31 PM
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a reply to: Edumakated

a reply to: SlapMonkey

All I needed to see was the heavy handed police response in Ferguson after Michael Brown was murdered. You want systemic police abuse at the hands of the administration who cited and fined these people for years with impunity, until they exploded.

Eric Garner was choked out in New York for selling cigarettes on a corner, Freddy whats is name was killed in the back of a police van, there are others. I don't live there, I'm not any but witness to what transpired over the internet. I get their frustration and their response why they formed a movement called BLM.

Historically there are other precedents, the 60's civil rights movement, the father of which (MLK) was shot and killed in Memphis, the Chicago MOVE organization, bombed and burned to the ground, the Black Panthers and others. I don't have to look to far to see the same heavy handed response every time the 'hood' gets 'Uppity'.

I'll leave out Watts riots, Rodney King riots and the uncountable lynchings over decades in the south for now.

Gotta keep the black man down.
edit on 24-3-2016 by intrptr because: added reply.



posted on Mar, 24 2016 @ 08:26 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

You do realize the rest of the country lives here too, right?

keep a black man down? Can you not go to school, get a job or buy property /own a business?

You realize that EVERYONE, ALL RACES are subject to police abuses.....right?

This is BS.

Talk about not showing solidarity with the rest of us.

also, what is the end game of all this?

you want the rest of us to support you in your cause that alienates EVERYONE ELSE?

Please. No one cares. Thats right. This movement is a joke.

Go fix your life and stop blaming everyone else who is not a problem and if you werent so racist to all other peoples would listen to an actual grievance you had.

bite me and your holding the black man down nonsense.

you sound like one of those snake oil salesmen from Harlem that everyone shuts up with the quickness for talking mess.

This whole movement is embarrassing to all black people and only serves to self segregate while keeping real solutions at arms length.

We are all one people.

I AM YOUR PEOPLE TOO, MY FELLOW AMERICAN

racist


edit on 3 24 2016 by tadaman because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 24 2016 @ 08:44 PM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey

originally posted by: intrptr
BLM is fed up with police murdering predominantly black people in their neighborhoods, as if gangs, drugs, de education and lack of jobs wasn't enough on their plate.


Fed up, maybe, but not NEARLY as vocal, angry, or active about that compared to worrying about the small percentage of cops (and even then, mostly only white cops) who shoot and kill a black person.

Their priorities are all ridiculous, as are their tactics, as are a large portion of their members...and as are the arguments that their apologists come up with to defend them.

Hell, I'm fed up with the gangs, drugs, education issues and job problems in poor urban neighborhoods (and anywhere else it is prevalent), but the problem is that the movement itself, for the most part, is turning into a large gang whose premise lacks education (or cherry picks its data). It's the blind leading the blind, here, and if it weren't for the fact that cops have been killed in the spirit of the movement and businesses and lives destroyed under the guise of "peaceful protest," it would be comical.

But it's not, because that movement is bringing with a lot of negatives that have begun to outweigh the positives.


I'm fed up with what was mentioned above. I lived it. During the winter months I was harassed and physically assaulted more than once. Because I have Italian ancestry I generally tan during the spring/summer/early fall months. At that point I can only assume I blended in and maybe passed for Hispanic. At this point I highly doubt the White masses, or the majority of white people, are themselves racist. There is an institutional legacy however. Just look at American prison populations and our pay to play justice system.

All that being said however most non white people that I came across either immediately disliked me or were very suspicious of me. All because of my skin color. That was openly admitted. I am not trying to claim any sort of oppression here. Again, this was an open secret if you will. From my experience and observation alot of racism and communal inequality exists in these lower income inner city neighborhoods. I've even seen a lighter black youth being beaten up by 2 other darker black youths while being called a "wannabe white ass ni***". This was in front of a boys and girls club and the kids couldn't have been older than 14 but still, WTF?

This is the # that really gets me going. I usually get my hair cut where I used to live because they can actually do a decent fade there and it doesn't cost $35. These barber shops are generally staffed by and serve African Americans and Puerto Ricans. It's funny how much we all have in common when we sit down and talk. When it's a new place that I've never been to do I sometimes get the White boy jokes? Sure. But I also give it right back and everyone laughs. The sad part is, in my experience, we all agree that we're being intentionally played against eachother. However at the end of the day we, as communities, aren't getting together and trying to fix it as human beings. Not blacks, whites, Hispanics, Asians or anyone else.



posted on Mar, 24 2016 @ 09:07 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Mike Brown murdered? At this point, you've pretty much discredited everything else you have to say...

I might as well debate particle physics with my two year old. Sad thing is that would probably be a more productive conversation.

My post stands...



posted on Mar, 25 2016 @ 08:15 AM
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originally posted by: Edumakated
a reply to: intrptr

Mike Brown murdered? At this point, you've pretty much discredited everything else you have to say...

I might as well debate particle physics with my two year old. Sad thing is that would probably be a more productive conversation.

My post stands…

A legend in your own mind.



posted on Mar, 25 2016 @ 09:37 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
All I needed to see was the heavy handed police response in Ferguson after Michael Brown was murdered.


LOL...Mike Brown wasn't murdered, but if you're still believing that, you probably think that he had his hands up, too, don't you?

The fact that you are STILL buying into the narrative that ex-officer Darren Wilson murdered Mike Brown goes a long way in explaining why you seemingly come to the table in discussion like this with little logic supporting your arguments.


Eric Garner was choked out in New York for selling cigarettes on a corner, Freddy whats is name was killed in the back of a police van, there are others. I don't live there, I'm not any but witness to what transpired over the internet. I get their frustration and their response why they formed a movement called BLM.



I agree that Garner's and Gray's deaths were wrong, and in those two instances, the officers should have (and did) be indicted on charges for the deaths, if for no other reason than to have all of the evidence come to light in a public forum and have average citizens decipher said evidence and see if it constituted guilt beyond any reasonable doubt (the yardstick by which our justice system measures guilt).

But that said, what really led to the Garner confrontation? Three things: A ridiculous law passed to ensure that the state got its tax money; an individual who was knowingly (and repeatedly) breaking the law who got aggressive with officers (at least in tone...even though I can understand his frustration at the time); overzealous police officer(s) who were, IMO, more aggressive than they needed to be against a guy selling "loosies" of a legal item on the street. So, there really is blame to go around, but BLM only looks at one of those ingredients and then ignores the root of the problem: Overbearing government with ridiculous laws.

Gray's death was obviously caused by illegal police activity, and I joined in the vocal outrage over it. But that said, this is not an appropriate response, and IMO, is what put the nail in the coffin of the BLM movement and its legitimacy as being a reasonable protest group:

On April 25, 2015, protests were organized in downtown Baltimore, and the protests turned violent as protesters threw rocks and set fires. At least 34 people were arrested, and 15 officers were injured. On April 27, rioting and looting began after the funeral of Gray, with two patrol cars destroyed and 15 officers reported injured. Protesters looted and burned down a CVS Pharmacy location in downtown Baltimore. In reaction to the unrest, the Maryland State Police sent 82 troopers to protect the city... Maryland Governor Larry Hogan declared a state of emergency, and activated the Maryland National Guard. Hogan also activated 500 state troopers for duty in Baltimore and requested an additional 5,000 police officers from other locales.

At a press conference, Baltimore's mayor announced there would be a citywide curfew from 10:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. School trips were canceled until mid-May, and Baltimore's city schools were closed on April 28. In addition, both the University of Maryland campus in downtown Baltimore and the Mondawmin Mall were closed early.

Source

Thirty-four arrests, fifteen officers injured (on two different days), structural fires set, rocks being thrown, rioting, looting, destroyed police cars, and as a response, increased police presence, activation of the National Guard, and needing to borrow officers from other places in order to protect the city from rioters and looters--and you imply that this is an example of a good and appropriate response from BLM; you imply that this behavior is justified?

Talk about systematic abuse--mobs of people that do this IS systematic abuse, so if you're going to call it out, call it out on both sides and don't leave it up to others.

I understand that not everyone was there supporting BLM--many were there to take advantage of the situation, and there is evidence that some were even paid to be there to cause problems and incite illegal activity--but when you actually do some research into people and organizations that support BLM and are active in it, you can often find things like this:

The rioting in Ferguson is the reason there is a Black Lives Matter movement. Without that explosion of righteous anger, the older “official” organizations of Black struggle would have maintained control of the organizing as they did with the response to Trayvon Martin’s murder. They were swept away for a time and in the space created new organizers were able to establish themselves, while thousands of people learned that it was possible to fight the police. It seems that the rioting was what many were waiting for, and it threw hundreds of thousands, if not millions of people into the street across the country.

Rioting has kicked off and sustained this movement, but is not an end in itself. The 1992 L.A. riots were much larger than the ones in Ferguson and Baltimore, but did not lead to a mass movement in the way that these did. Movements must defend all rioters both politically and materially, but must also take into account the context of the particular riots. Every riot is not the revolution. We must look at what groups or social forces are likely to benefit from the aftermath, and act accordingly. It’s important for people to experience their collective power and see that the police and the system they protect are not invincible, but if new forms of Black working class and poor self-organization don’t emerge from the ashes then riots can just be a “flash in the pan.”

Source (emphasis is mine)

This type of mentality is dangerous, pure and simple. Yes, so is systemic abuse of the public by law enforcement, but one does not outweigh the other, IMO, because each brings with it the possibility of innocent people becoming victims at the hands of someone who has no right to be victimizing.


Historically there are other precedents, the 60's civil rights movement, the father of which (MLK) was shot and killed in Memphis, the Chicago MOVE organization, bombed and burned to the ground, the Black Panthers and others. I don't have to look to far to see the same heavy handed response every time the 'hood' gets 'Uppity'.

I'll leave out Watts riots, Rodney King riots and the uncountable lynchings over decades in the south for now.

Gotta keep the black man down.


And you can also cite things like riots at the end of hockey games, or other sports venues, where the crowds are not all black and not from the hood, but there is still a heavy police hand in trying to keep the peace.

You're thought process is warped with ideology. Yes, I understand that the militarization local police forces and some of their tactics may be used too quickly and aggressively in some situations, but what you're doing is lumping everything into one big pile and pretending that they're all the same, and that is all in an attempt to "keep the black man down."

Like I've already said in this thread--that's yet ANOTHER terrible tactic to use, and people who are paying attention see right through it.



posted on Mar, 25 2016 @ 09:54 AM
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a reply to: s3cz0ne

Good post and well-said...the most pertinent part of it, I think, is when you mention that, "It's funny how much we all have in common when we sit down and talk."

That's the problem--we don't truly talk anymore, across racial lines or even within, really. Our language about things that actually matter has been reduced to talking points and poorly researched internet memes, and there is no real cognitive ability anymore when it comes to truly discussing things.

I grew up in California where the vast majority of my friends growing up were of Mexican lineage, with quite a few white people and black people thrown in for good measure. I had Asian friends, too, but there just weren't that many in my school, so they were the minority in my friend circle. The point, being, though, is that even though I was in junior high and high school right during and immediately after the Rodney King issue and the riots of '92, there was never any racial tension that emerged. Hell, we even occasionally threw around racial terms between races that were used as terms of endearment (like they do within races), and no one cared. We were both innocent enough and smart enough to understand that they are just words, and it mattered how the words were used, not what they meant 40 years prior.

Sadly and disappointingly, innocent days like that are gone. The ability to see HOW words are used instead of WHICH words are used has faded into the sunset, much like personal responsibility and thick skin.

But my point is that even though I was benefitted by growing up where I didn't notice skin color because it was just normal to have friends of all types (and we looked passed the color of skin...or didn't notice it...either one), we WERE just a group of people, and not a group of mixed races. That's how we saw ourselves, and I feel like we have gone backwards in modern times and have once again started caring more about the words instead of the meaning--and even then, we have forgotten that even if sticks and stone may break my bones, words should never hurt us.



posted on Mar, 25 2016 @ 09:56 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
A legend in your own mind.


But he's right.

And apparently smarter than me, because he seemingly walked away from the conversation...



posted on Mar, 25 2016 @ 09:57 AM
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originally posted by: JIMC5499
a reply to: 727Sky

I used to work with an Engineer who was black. He was a real good guy, with a nice family. His parents still lived in the house that he grew up in. He would never take his children to his parent's house, he would always pick up his parents and bring them to his. He offered to buy them a house near his, but, his parents refused. We were talking one day and this subject came up and I asked him why he didn't take his kids to his parents? He told me that he was afraid for their safety. The people in the neighborhood where he grew up considered him a traitor. He had been told that he had sold out and became white. A black man makes a success of himself and others of his race scorn him.



I find it curious that almost 100 percent of the time there's a post about black people, this story ( or some version of it) always gets posted. How many versions on the first page of this thread alone? Where are you people finding these black people?

How is it that I, a successful black man, have NEVER encountered them? Why doesn't my block consider me a traitor? According to internet posts, they should because they're black right? I'm very curious as to where these people are growing up.

Most people don't 'hate' when someone makes it out. It's actually considered an achievement, given the odds.

Sounds like some people are using the jealousy (haters) of a few people to (dishonestly imo because no one can be that stupid) depict an entire race. (Maybe that's your inner you trying to justify and rationalize your thoughts? )

The white guy sitting outside of my office at this very moment is incredibly jealous of me. I'm half his age, but I'm the leading engineer.

Is it okay for me to know state that If you're black and you're successful, white people will, without a doubt, get jealous and start to 'hate' ?
edit on 25-3-2016 by Tsubaki because: (no reason given)

edit on 25-3-2016 by Tsubaki because: (no reason given)

edit on 25-3-2016 by Tsubaki because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2016 @ 10:20 AM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

Slap, at some point, you gotta just let it go. No amount of facts and logic will convince some people. Like I said, he can't directly answer the simple question and thus my point was proven to be correct.



posted on Mar, 25 2016 @ 10:39 AM
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a reply to: Edumakated

Yeah, I'm there. I'm backing away slowly as not to startle the thread...



posted on Mar, 25 2016 @ 11:38 AM
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originally posted by: Tsubaki

originally posted by: JIMC5499
a reply to: 727Sky

I used to work with an Engineer who was black. He was a real good guy, with a nice family. His parents still lived in the house that he grew up in. He would never take his children to his parent's house, he would always pick up his parents and bring them to his. He offered to buy them a house near his, but, his parents refused. We were talking one day and this subject came up and I asked him why he didn't take his kids to his parents? He told me that he was afraid for their safety. The people in the neighborhood where he grew up considered him a traitor. He had been told that he had sold out and became white. A black man makes a success of himself and others of his race scorn him.



I find it curious that almost 100 percent of the time there's a post about black people, this story ( or some version of it) always gets posted. How many versions on the first page of this thread alone? Where are you people finding these black people?

How is it that I, a successful black man, have NEVER encountered them? Why doesn't my block consider me a traitor? According to internet posts, they should because they're black right? I'm very curious as to where these people are growing up.

Most people don't 'hate' when someone makes it out. It's actually considered an achievement, given the odds.

Sounds like some people are using the jealousy (haters) of a few people to (dishonestly imo because no one can be that stupid) depict an entire race. (Maybe that's your inner you trying to justify and rationalize your thoughts? )

The white guy sitting outside of my office at this very moment is incredibly jealous of me. I'm half his age, but I'm the leading engineer.

Is it okay for me to know state that If you're black and you're successful, white people will, without a doubt, get jealous and start to 'hate' ?


So you've never been:

1) accused of talking white for speaking proper english?
2) accused of acting white for doing well in school?
3) accused of being a sellout if you happen to disagree with the liberal political narrative?
4) accused of acting white for doing anything that black people typically don't do... take your pick from obscure hobbies to admitting you can't dance?

I too am a successful black man and I experienced all of those things from childhood. I grew up in a predominantly black neighborhood in the 70s/80s.

I got picked on because I rode skateboards and raced BMX instead of baseball, basketball, or football.

I got picked on because I did well in school and I spoke proper english.

I've been called a sell out because I don't believe in progressive politics.

I can go on and on. Does it bother me? Not really. I could give 2Fs at this point in my life. I have a beautiful black wife, son, HBCU educated and done more in a weekend to help black folks than many of the BLM ministrels will ever do. I find it hard to believe you have not experienced the same.

Pretty much every successful black person I know has experienced it to some degree.



posted on Mar, 25 2016 @ 12:10 PM
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Awww, what a bummer, intrptr doesn't want to play anymore.

Theres no point to bickering with racists anyway, their sugar coated ridicule gets thickerer, their replies grow ever longer…

until you realize you're up against an impenetrable wall of hate.

Carry on building walls…


Whats that? I can't hear through that wall you're building.



posted on Mar, 25 2016 @ 12:13 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Agreed nice post!!



posted on Mar, 25 2016 @ 06:50 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

Awww, what a bummer, intrptr doesn't want to play anymore.

Theres no point to bickering with racists anyway, their sugar coated ridicule gets thickerer, their replies grow ever longer…

until you realize you're up against an impenetrable wall of hate.

Carry on building walls…


Whats that? I can't hear through that wall you're building.


There's never a point. It's like a Marxist talking to an evangelical conservative. Nothing will get done. However, I certainly do hesitate to accuse anyone of racism. That is a very, very heavy charge to level.

Also there is quite a bit of hate. IMO most of that hate is the result of misunderstanding(s). Does tough guy/thug culture exist in impoverished neighborhoods? Of course. One might argue that it derives from a sort of "survival of the fittest" mentality. I am obviously oversimplifing it. One could also argue that many white supremacists exist in the US. Too many do but they are a very vocal minority. The problem, at this point, seems to be an institutional legacy. It's a problem when it makes more economic sense to have kids and get welfare dollars. It's a problem when dropping out of your 35 pupil highschool class to make $1,000, $2,000, $3,000 or more week seems like the better option. It's a problem that many from inner city schools are basically denied the opportunity for an education that would allow them a college education. This isn't all about pulling ones self up by ones boot straps.

The system has intentionally been set up in such a way to achieve these results and has done damn well doing so. Let not even get into incarceration rates and all the rest. Just like banking, voting, etc.... It's all rigged from the start.

Manufactured hate, discontent and riots!



posted on Mar, 25 2016 @ 10:12 PM
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a reply to: s3cz0ne


This isn't all about pulling ones self up by ones boot straps.

The system has intentionally been set up in such a way to achieve these results and has done damn well doing so. Let not even get into incarceration rates and all the rest. Just like banking, voting, etc.... It's all rigged from the start.

Manufactured hate, discontent and riots!

You're spot on. People may not be that strong to rise above it. People that don't live there will never get that.



posted on Mar, 26 2016 @ 01:45 PM
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people have amnesia. americans are in so much denial about out history and the impact it still has on people. play all the games you want but there is so much information available the lies, historic distortions, coverups, excuses etc can only last but so long. the is only one group responsible for world wide destruction.

people are now able to stand up to these system without fear of immediate death. I personally know no person involved with BLM. They were created to bring a voice to certain issues and its working. If you think they represent all black people then you are the problem. black people are the most diverse group on the planet. oh wait there is no such thing as a black person or white person for that matter.

edit on 03pm13America/Chicago3150k by magnetik because: (no reason given)



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