It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

WAR: NASCAR innovation to aid chopper pilots vision in Iraq

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 12 2005 @ 01:19 AM
link   
What does a Nextel Cup race car and a U.S. Army Blackhawk helicopter have in common? Hopefully the protective windshield coating developed by Pro-Tint Inc. which helps keep the race cars windshields clear of debits can also be of aid for the copter pilots. When a race car windshield becomes pitted from impacts and the like, a layer of the protectant is peeled off leaving a new windshield. Recently the company teamed up with United Protective Technologies to develop a thicker version for the U.S. Army
 



www.miami.com
KANNAPOLIS, N.C. - A protective windshield coating that improves visibility for NASCAR drivers is getting a new application - on the windshields of U.S. Army Blackhawk helicopters flying combat missions over Iraq.

The clear plastic film, which race teams have been using for several years to keep flying debris from ruining drivers' view of the track, was pioneered by Pro-Tint Inc., a 14-person operation headquartered in a small building in the heart of Nextel Cup racing country.

Pro-Tint pioneered tear-away windshield film for racing teams in the late 1990s. The multilayer product is now used by virtually all Nextel Cup teams to protect windshields from small rocks, car parts and other debris that can reduce vision at speedways like Darlington and Bristol.

Instead of replacing a scratched and pitted windshield, race teams merely peel off a layer of the protective film to reveal a new, clear layer of film underneath.

Recently, Pro-Tint teamed up with United Protective Technologies, another tiny firm, to produce a thicker and more complex Mylar protective film for military helicopters.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


This is good news for the Pentagon. Apparently the sand and dust are eating up windshields at a rapid rate. Some are being replaced at a cost of $15,000 each not counting the downtime needed to actually perform the repair. But with this new system in place it doubles the life of the windshield and costs a mere, for the Pentagon that is, $1,000. If this works out it will be a great deal for the Army.




posted on Jan, 12 2005 @ 04:58 AM
link   
Well, thats just dandy. How about puting that money into actually helping people in Iraq build up their infrastructure instead of wasting it on war machines
that only help things get worse. A man with job and a full belly is less reluctant to violence.
Its nice to know that atleast the choper pilots are safer now, I mean its not their fault that tehir in that mess.



posted on Jan, 12 2005 @ 09:36 AM
link   
thanks for this FredT -- that is
As a Nascar Fan -- it's great to see one of their innovations come to good use for other things. Plus I am all for saving money that ultimately comes out of our pocket in taxes


jm



posted on Jan, 12 2005 @ 10:45 AM
link   
Outstanding. I think it is great to see a civilian technology used in a military apllication. All too often the flow-through goes the other way. The military at huge R&D costs come up with a technology, and then it is passed on to the civilian sector. This time the civilian sector developed a system at low R&D and then passed it on.

The R&D costs are typically, and even in other industries, a main reason why prices for somethings are so high.



posted on Jan, 12 2005 @ 12:44 PM
link   

Originally posted by TheDarkFlame
Well, thats just dandy. How about puting that money into actually helping people in Iraq build up their infrastructure instead of wasting it on war machines


You cannot build up an infrastructure unless you take care of the insurgency. What goo dis building up a home only to have it blown up?

It is cool to see civilian sector product make thier way into the military.



posted on Jan, 12 2005 @ 08:18 PM
link   

Originally posted by FredT
The clear plastic film, which race teams have been using for several years to keep flying debris from ruining drivers' view of the track, was pioneered by Pro-Tint Inc., a 14-person operation headquartered in a small building in the heart of Nextel Cup racing country.


Fantastic another great improvement for our miltary.

NASCAR and Auto racing in general have given us all many improvements for our cars based on their research.

Just a thought but perhaps and I do say perhaps this may help on normal cars. Think of the money insurance companies could save by not having to replace the windshields of cars hit by stones.




top topics
 
0

log in

join