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Have you really considered your water usage/needs in the event of no mains supply?

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posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 10:09 AM
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a reply to: grainofsand

If I do come and help don't let me drive the digger though.

Last time I drove one I fell in the hole and the track fell off.




posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 10:20 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific

Haha, funny you should say that, I've got loads of tanking slurry mix left over from jobs where the customer paid for a 25kg tub but only a fifth or less was needed. They were happy with the price, and I was happy with the 'leftovers'.
I'll buy most materials on my mates account at the builders merchant, he's a property developer so gets a massive discount.
He likes doing that and getting the cash in his hand for some reason...



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 10:23 AM
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originally posted by: nonspecific
a reply to: grainofsand

If I do come and help don't let me drive the digger though.

Last time I drove one I fell in the hole and the track fell off.

Lol, I was driving the digger on Friday, burying a load of rubble so my mate avoided the £100 per ton landfill charge.
You'd be amazed at what is buried in rural parts...



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 09:38 AM
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originally posted by: grainofsand

originally posted by: nonspecific
a reply to: grainofsand

If I do come and help don't let me drive the digger though.

Last time I drove one I fell in the hole and the track fell off.

Lol, I was driving the digger on Friday, burying a load of rubble so my mate avoided the £100 per ton landfill charge.
You'd be amazed at what is buried in rural parts...


reminds me of a mate who moved into a house with slightly overgrown garden, when he got around to cutting it all dow he found a big rectangle-ish bit of soil that felt like it would collapse when any weight was on it, there was a weird movement down and back up. After a major panic that he'd rented a house with a sink hole or something he dug gently down to find 3 old rotten king-size mattresses stacked up and covered with about a foot of soil lol I'm guessing it was also to avoid charges by previous tenants



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 09:45 AM
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Yes, I have a Katadyn survivor 06 reverse osmosis water maker it can make 6 drinkable gallons a day, I also have a 4200 Watt gas generator, and a 5000 watt power inverter in my Jeep, I have all of my tools and equipment in my Jeep



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 11:36 AM
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originally posted by: DonVoigt
Yes, I have a Katadyn survivor 06 reverse osmosis water maker it can make 6 drinkable gallons a day

I just looked that up, a nifty piece of kit, not cheap though at £700, but I guess you get what you pay for.
Sounds like you really are prepared



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 11:45 AM
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a reply to: grainofsand

I have considered the impact of no municipal water supply. To that end I envisioned a solar powered device I called a scavenger to pull water out of the air and deposit it in a container. When I did the patent search I found the device already existed - so I bought one.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 01:30 PM
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originally posted by: Vroomfondel
When I did the patent search I found the device already existed - so I bought one.

Ooh, your post got me interested and I've searched a while but only really found a recent invention by a bright young chap in Australia.
Do you have a link to the supplier, or the name of the product you purchased please?



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 02:35 PM
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You know I was just thinking of this the other day myself. When my grandparents lived on the farm they had a well and had to watch how much they used so they told me to never flush the toilet unless it was #2, and sometimes even then. Sometimes my grandma even had a sh*t bucket that you had to use to do your jobs because there was no water in the toilet to flush with at all.(She used to walk up into the field or way down into the ditch to dump that.) They did a lot of boiling their water or when they could afford it get several gallon jugs and put it in the fridge and storage. She also had a big container outside used to catch rain water and they would boil that as well and use it for cooking, drinking and baths. She also made sure the dog had water in his bowl but would mainly leave that for nature.(It was an outside dog who had an awesome dog house which was insulated for the winters and had rooms.) She had a shower, but never was used and it was always hot water from the wood burning stove that was dumped into the tub. More I think about it, I never really saw water out of the tap but for once, and it was a nasty brown color and stunk to high heaven. This was during the 80's and early 90's.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 02:40 PM
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a reply to: MacSen191

Ah, thanks for sharing that interesting story

Pretty much all houses in the UK have had clean piped water for so long (even rural areas) that it is taken for granted.
Your grandparents sound like those who would survive quite well while younger generations would fall apart in the event of supply interruption.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 07:09 PM
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originally posted by: Vroomfondel
a reply to: grainofsand

I have considered the impact of no municipal water supply. To that end I envisioned a solar powered device I called a scavenger to pull water out of the air and deposit it in a container. When I did the patent search I found the device already existed - so I bought one.


I'm curious as well. What did you get exactly? Everything I search is in startup phase with no real product to sell/buy.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 08:08 PM
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Yes, there will be much less baths and showers.

Need to conserve for drinking and cooking.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 08:30 PM
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a reply to: StoutBroux

Actually the one I got was from a start-up. My nephew knows one of the guys developing them.

Tbere are a lot of DIY types you can make though in the mean time. I first got the idea from the dehumidifier I have in my basement. The one I wanted to make worked the same way, just much smaller. It was really nothing more than some copper tubing, a small pump and coolant reservoir, a container to drain in to, and a power source. My version had interchangeable one liter bottles.

There are all sorts of air wells, solar stills, and such available right now. Of course, if you want a slightly larger air to water device that runs on a/c there are plenty to choose from. Several companies make residential air/water machines. There is a registry of over 2000 companies in this field right now. How many are ready for production I don't know but I am sure it is not far off. The technology isn't new. Its just re-purposed air conditioning or dehumidifiers.

I got started on the solar powered thing a few years ago with a solar battery charger that will charge any size portable battery and/or exchange a charge from one type to another. With solar panels being more efficient and less expensive, making the transition to a solar powered unit is pretty easy.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 08:51 PM
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a reply to: Vroomfondel
I had looked at the Fontus which was featured in the Huffington Post in 2014, www.huffingtonpost.com... Many newer articles but it appears to be crowd funded and so far, hasn't gone anywhere. There are many negative reviews by people on the schematics, saying it would be a poor water source because of the low volume it would generate.




It seems like there are lots of ideas in the works but very few in reality are available. Thanks for replying.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 09:00 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand

I doubt it.

Some of the stuff I've found over the years is rather incredible.

An entire car, filled with trash. Don't ask me, I've no clue who, muchless why...but someone buried it under a foot and a half of dirt sometime in the 70's...it'd been buried for right around twenty years, when we found it.

Stoves. Freezers, no bodies in 'em thank god. Boxes of magazines, old Life from WWII (so cool, I've kept most of them.). A box of ceramic horseheads, mostly broken.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 09:33 PM
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a reply to: StoutBroux

The bicycle one is a neat idea but definitely single user volume.


Residential Atmospheric Water Generators, also known as AWGs, generate water from the natural humidity in the atmosphere. GR8 Water’s AWG's for the home and office can generate enough water for the average-sized family each day without the need for an external water source; making about ten gallons of clean water each day at 72 degrees F and 55% humidity. The water generated with the GR8 Water AWG is one of the purest in the world and is free from foreign matter or inorganic materials thanks to the advanced filtration system built into each unit. The ozonation and UV processes that all water made with the GR8 Water AWG goes through ensure that all bacteria and other microorganisms in the water produced are eliminated. The one-of-a-kind patent pending air purification ensures that the indoor air will be of the highest quality. GR8 Water AWG’s are completely mobile and are compatible with standard electrical hook-ups, but can also be powered by alternative energy sources. This makes the GR8 Water AWG’s ideal for use during a natural disaster when the water supply might have been compromised by flood, hurricane, or other forces of nature. The residential GR8 Water Factory can be purchased with an option to provide up to 12,000 BTUs of air conditioning.


link



posted on Apr, 14 2016 @ 01:12 AM
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In the UK you are rarely far from some form of natural water source be it streams, rivers, ponds, waterlogged ditches etc. The big problem is cleanliness. Even if you store water it goes stagnant after a while unless treated.

A great solution is the Lifesaver bottle. Although a bit expensive it is what it says on the tin. 6000 litres of clean and drinkable water. We carried these on OMLT tasks in Afghanistan when we would be embedded with ANSF for weeks. We would be drinking from filthy canals full of human and animal waste. Even the wells were infested with parasites. These bottles were amazing and prevented serious disease. It has a bigger brother, the Lifesaver jerrycan. This allows for up to 20'000 litres of water and stores 18 litres at a time.

I only sing praise for these items because I have used them in real life and they have been unbeatable. I may or may not have 'acquired' one or two new bottles at the end of my last tour...
edit on 14-4-2016 by PaddyInf because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2016 @ 12:51 PM
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originally posted by: PaddyInf
In the UK you are rarely far from some form of natural water source be it streams, rivers, ponds, waterlogged ditches etc. The big problem is cleanliness. Even if you store water it goes stagnant after a while unless treated.

A great solution is the Lifesaver bottle. Although a bit expensive it is what it says on the tin. 6000 litres of clean and drinkable water. We carried these on OMLT tasks in Afghanistan when we would be embedded with ANSF for weeks. We would be drinking from filthy canals full of human and animal waste. Even the wells were infested with parasites. These bottles were amazing and prevented serious disease. It has a bigger brother, the Lifesaver jerrycan. This allows for up to 20'000 litres of water and stores 18 litres at a time.

I only sing praise for these items because I have used them in real life and they have been unbeatable. I may or may not have 'acquired' one or two new bottles at the end of my last tour...


Those would be a brilliant thing to have but I doubt many of us have them ready on hand to use in emergency situations. My temporary solution for water sterilisation is to raid as many hydroponic shops as possible (Iv got 4 in walking distance) in the first few days of an emergency. Hydro shops have h2o2 aka hydrogen peroxide, its not the best water steriliser but is safe to use short term until you've built or acquired a steriliser for drinking water, best used on your already stored water and not river/puddle/dirty water. They usually have bulk cans of h2o2 so grab as many as you can, it can also be used to clean wounds and loads of other useful stuff 34 uses for peroxide

While I'm at the hydro shops il also be grabbing some ozone generators, carbon filters and UV sterilisers. 2 of them require electricity but I have access to the mother of all generators so not much of a problem. If you have no power then the activated carbon from the carbon filters work but are not recommended for use on their own and the carbon only works for a while but can be reactivated using heat, the centre of a good bonfire is adequate for that.
You could also use reverse osmosis BUT it can be quite acidic and has no minerals left that are vital to our bodies so best used for washing instead of drinking, this is also the same for distilled water both can strip bone and teeth if you have no calcium supplements (distillation is also wasteful, I think its something like 5 gallons in 1 out) If the only water you have access to is salt/sea water then RO and distillation would be good if you can get extra calcium and have a way of regulating the PH

Some good filter info here



posted on Apr, 14 2016 @ 02:23 PM
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a reply to: PaddyInf

What's that in usd?

A bit pricey, but well worth it, under the right circumstances.

I doubt I'd order from overseas, though... The shipping is outrageous.




posted on Apr, 15 2016 @ 02:58 AM
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a reply to: seagull

You're looking at $150 - $200. They are available in the US if you look for them. Like I said, a bit pricy but well worth it. The 6000 litre unit gives something like 15 litres of drinkable water per day for a year before changing filters. We were issued the 4000 litre unit which easily lasted for 6 month tours. We carried one per 4 man team if out for extended periods.

They do have some disadvantages. They can fail if the temp is below 0C, and the casing can be fragile if dropped. If you look after them though they are great. I kept mine in the middle of my daysack to protect it and it never gave me any dramas. This was on a winter tour in Helmand, which gets pretty cold.

Lifesaver is at the top of the range, but there are other filtration systems out there like the lifestraw etc. They come in a range of prices and specs to suit your needs. Most of the popular ones are good quality and are well worth a look if you are serious about prep.



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