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Happy Nowruz ATS!

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posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 02:09 AM
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Happy new year ! Nowruz is a celebration of spring coming to our lives . its the celebration of life and light .

Wish you all a happy happy new year no matter if you celebrate it or not . may peace prevail in our world .


Iranian new Year - Nowruz

Nowruz, the Iranian/Persian New Year starts on the exact moment of the Vernal Equinox. As it is marked by the beginning of spring, Nowruz is the universal celebration of renewal and rebirth. Just when the flowers blossom and the trees come to life ....



Nowruz is celebrated and observed by Iranian peoples and the related cultural continent and has spread in many other parts of the world, including parts of Central Asia, Caucasus, South Asia, Northwestern China, the Crimea and some groups in the Balkans.

Nowruz marks the first day of spring and the beginning of the year in Iranian calendar. It is celebrated on the day of the astronomical Northward equinox, which usually occurs on March 21 or the previous/following day depending on where it is observed. As well as being a Zoroastrian holiday and having significance amongst the Zoroastrian ancestors of modern Iranians, the same time is celebrated in parts of the South Asian sub-continent as the new year.

The moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator and equalizes night and day is calculated exactly every year and Iranian families gather together to observe the rituals.

At the time of the equinox, the sun is observed to be directly over the equator, and the north and south poles of the Earth lie along the solar terminator; sunlight is evenly divided between the north and south hemispheres.

In around the 11th century CE major reforms of the Iranian calendars took place and whose principal purpose were to fix the beginning of the calendar year, i.e. Nowrūz, at the vernal equinox. Accordingly, the definition of Nowruz given by the Iranian scientist "Ṭūsī "was the following: "the first day of the official new year [Nowruz] was always the day on which the sun entered Aries before noon".



The UN's General Assembly in 2010 recognized the International Day of Norooz, describing it a spring festival of Persian origin which has been celebrated for over 3,000 years. During the meeting of The Inter-governmental Committee for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Heritage of the United Nations, held between 28 September – 2 October 2009 in Abu Dhabi, Nowrūz was officially registered on the UNESCO List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.






Nowruz is a time for family and friends to gather and celebrate the end of one year and the beginning of the next. Children have a fourteen-day vacation from school, and most adults do not work during the Nowruz festivities. Throughout the holiday period friends and family gather at each other’s houses for meals and conversation. Preparing for Nowruz starts a few weeks prior to the New Year with a traditional spring cleaning of the home. At this time it is also customary to purchase new clothing for the family and new furniture for the home.

Chahar Shanbe Suri: The Fire Jumping Traditions

On the night of the last Wednesday of the old year Chahar Shanbe Suri, in Persian, is celebrated. During the night of Chahar Shanbe Suri people traditionally gather and light small bonfires in the streets and jump over the flames shouting: “Zardie man az to, sorkhie to az man” in Persian, which means, “May my sickly pallor be yours and your red glow be mine.” With this phrase, the flames symbolically take away all of the unpleasant things that happened in the past year. Because jumping over a fire is dangerous, many people today simply light the bonfire and shout the special phrase without getting too close to the flames.





Tahvil: The Exact Moment of the New Year

Families return home after the events of Chahar Shanbe Suri and wait together for the exact moment when the vernal equinox occurs, in Persian called Tahvil. Today people know the moment of Tahvil through searching on the Internet or looking in the newspaper. However, before these sources of information were available, families knew that the New Year was close when a special person called Haji Firooz came to the neighborhood to sing, dance and spread the news of owruz. Haji Firooz is usually dressed in a red satin outfit with his/her face painted as a disguise.
When the New Year is just minutes away families and friends gather together and wait for Tahvil to occur. Right after the moment of Nowruz, the family exchanges well wishes such as “Happy New Year” or “Sal-e No Mobarak!” in Persian. Next, the eldest in the family distributes special sweets and candies to everyone, and young children are given coins as presents. It is also traditional for families and neighbors to visit each other and exchange special gifts.

Haft-Seen Table: The Table of Seven S’s

The most important activity in the celebration of Nowruz is making the haft-seen table. Haft is the Persian word for the number seven and seen is the Persian word for the letter S. Literally, the haft-seen table means a “table of seven things that start with the letter S’. Creating the haft-seen table is a family activity that begins by spreading a special family cloth on the table. Next the table is set with the seven S items.

Here are some of the items and what they symbolize:

Sumac (crushed spice of berries): For the sunrise and the spice of life
Senjed (sweet dry fruit of the lotus tree): For love and affection
Serkeh (vinegar): For patience and age
Seeb (apples): For health and beauty
Sir (garlic): For good health
Samanu (wheat pudding): For fertility and the sweetness of life
Sabzeh (sprouted wheat grass): For rebirth and renewal of nature

In addition to these S items, there are other symbolic items that go on the haft-seen table, depending on the tradition of each family. It is customary to place a mirror on the table to symbolize reflection on the past year, an orange in a bowl of water to symbolize the Earth, a bowl of real goldfish to symbolize new life, colored eggs to represent fertility, coins for prosperity in the New Year, special flowers called hyacinths to symbolize spring and candles to radiate light
and happiness. Each family places other items on the table that are special, for example the Qur’an, the holy book of Islam, or the Shahnameh, an epic Persian story of colorful kings and princes written around the year 1000 CE.

Another important item to place on the haft-seen table is a book of poetry by the famous poet Shams ud-Din Hafez.Hafez lived in Persian lands during the 14th Century CE and wrote many volumes of poetry and prose narratives.Many Persians consider Hafez to be their national poet, and his historical status is similar to the importance of Shakespeare in the English-speaking world.


Happy new year everyone .




posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 02:11 AM
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Happy Nowruz to you and your loved ones. Sorry haven't had time to read your post but will later. I hope this year brings you many happy times



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 02:38 AM
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a reply to: haman10

Happy New Year to you haman10 and to your family and friends.

I love your pictures. They make me think of spring.

I like the idea of the family decorating the Haft-Seen table.



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 03:13 AM
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i never knew this existed.

Happy Nowruz.



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 03:20 AM
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a reply to: haman10

Happy Nowruz


Thanks for shining a light on the culture and times of a place most of us here never think about.



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 04:10 AM
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originally posted by: Kandinsky
a reply to: haman10

Happy Nowruz


Thanks for shining a light on the culture and times of a place most of us here never think about.

originally posted by: crappiekat
a reply to: haman10

Happy New Year to you haman10 and to your family and friends.

I love your pictures. They make me think of spring.

I like the idea of the family decorating the Haft-Seen table.

originally posted by: Cloudbuster
Happy Nowruz to you and your loved ones. Sorry haven't had time to read your post but will later. I hope this year brings you many happy times

Thank you all .

I know for a fact that being healthy is the most beautiful and precious gift thats bestowed upon us .

So i wish you all a super healthy year for you and your loved ones .



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 05:43 AM
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Happy Nowruz.

Thank you for a very interesting and informative post.

I've often thought it would make more sense for the New Year to be celebrated on the first day of Spring. The traditions you describe sound delightful.

I'll certainly be investigating Shahnameh. If I can find a good translation to read online it might keep me quiet for a while



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 05:57 AM
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a reply to: haman10

Happy Nowruz, haman, and may this year bring you good health and much happiness. I'm going to check out Hafez later, I've never heard of him so many thanks to you for the education this morning.





posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 07:50 AM
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a reply to: haman10

Happy Nowruz haman , may it be a better one for all of us , new year = new hope.



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 07:51 AM
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Happy Nowruz and Happy Spring to you! I found this to be a lovely and informative thread and I thank you for that!





posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 07:55 AM
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a reply to: haman10

Happy Nowruz



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 08:12 AM
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What a beautiful thread. Happy Nowruz!



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 09:05 AM
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a reply to: haman10

Great post, thank you! I have 1/4 Iranian Persian ancestry. My great grandparents came to the US in the late 1800s, but none of them passed much of their culture on, other than a few recipes.

I relish in re-discovering my (and now my wife's) ancestral cultures. Back then, people wanted to near completely wash themselves of their homeland's culture and adopt their new one. Much of this, of course, was because immigrants weren't exactly treated kindly. They felt that the best chance for their children's success was to quickly become one with their surroundings.

Today, some people near-completely retain their culture when they immigrate. I wish there had been a "happy medium" long ago. Since there wasn't, I now feel it my "duty" as the generational "leader" of my broader family to bring back the knowledge, and to some degree, practices of the ancestors. My children have 7 identifiable ethnic backgrounds - being able to learn and experience from all of them, even in small "dabbles" in each, can be very enriching.

We can learn from all cultures, including those we have no history with. The commonalities are as fascinating as the differences! Thank you so much for sharing - I'm going to plan ahead on this being our "spring equinox" next year.



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 09:36 AM
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Thanks for sharing this! I had no idea of any of these beautiful traditions. I'm captivated by Persian culture.



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 09:46 AM
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Thank you all , ATS !

Here is a picture of my very own Haft Seen :



not much a single man can do, but felt like sharing it
and thats my silly cousin trying to mess the picture up .

Have the best of times ! love you guys .



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 10:33 AM
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a reply to: haman10

Happy Nowruz/Newroz.
نوروز مبارک

But I have unfortunately to sound nasty, by mentioning how the Newroz celebration is turning into a police crackdown against Kurds in Turkey at the moment :

#Newroz




posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 11:43 AM
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originally posted by: theultimatebelgianjoke
a reply to: haman10

Happy Nowruz/Newroz.
نوروز مبارک

But I have unfortunately to sound nasty, by mentioning how the Newroz celebration is turning into a police crackdown against Kurds in Turkey at the moment :

#Newroz


I wish it was just water cannons that were being used . how can someone ban the celebration of new year ? this is ridiculous .



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: haman10

I managed to find an English translation of the Shahnameh which can be read online:


www.iranchamber.com...


Thank you for mentioning it, I've been looking for something of substance to read for a while and this is so much my sort of 'thing'.



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 08:30 PM
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Prosperous Nowruz to you!

I really like seeing the cultural aspects of other places. That's the grit that should unite us all. Thank you!



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 08:53 PM
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Happy Norwuz!



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