It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Boeing 737 from Dubai crashes in southern Russia

page: 8
24
<< 5  6  7    9  10  11 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 12:26 AM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Wow good info, I wonder how long it will take to give out the data to the public! Your pretty good at finding info quickly. Like the voice recording was great you posted. You might be able to retrieve it quicker!




posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 12:28 AM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: carewemust

When an aircraft stalls the nose drops, just like you see there.

This was a 747 freighter taking off in Afghanistan. One of the MRAPs they were carrying shifted aft, causing them to stall, and crash.

youtu.be...

That's exactly what this aircraft did.



That video is frightening. I've seen it many times and my blood runs cold every time. It's so odd to see a 747 act like this. What the hell must have gone through those pilots minds as they plummeted.



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 12:33 AM
link   
a reply to: Quantum12

Anywhere from three days to a week usually. The CVR is harder to read than the FDR is.



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 12:38 AM
link   
a reply to: 3danimator2014

Omg that video is scary. Did anyone live? I will have bad dreams tonight!



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 12:40 AM
link   

originally posted by: Quantum12
a reply to: 3danimator2014

Omg that video is scary. Did anyone live? I will have bad dreams tonight!


I'm pretty sure no one got out of that one mate.



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 12:40 AM
link   
a reply to: Quantum12

No. I believe it was 8 on board, all were killed on impact.



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 09:21 AM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

That video was taken down for some reason. Try this one:




posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 04:18 PM
link   
Just before the crash the pilots were warned of moderate windshear.

A former FlyDubai pilot has come forward saying that he's willing to bet that fatigue played a role. He says that pilots are worked to exhaustion, with few breaks, and often switching from daytime flights to night flights. The captain involved in this accident had worked 11 days doing just that, with one day off. When he turned in his resignation he cited frequent fatigue and the schedule as one of the reasons for leaving.

www.rt.com...



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 06:57 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
Just before the crash the pilots were warned of moderate windshear.

A former FlyDubai pilot has come forward saying that he's willing to bet that fatigue played a role. He says that pilots are worked to exhaustion, with few breaks, and often switching from daytime flights to night flights. The captain involved in this accident had worked 11 days doing just that, with one day off. When he turned in his resignation he cited frequent fatigue and the schedule as one of the reasons for leaving.

www.rt.com...


Stories like this worry the hell out of me. I had heard them before and decided never to fly Ryanair because of the stories of low pay and long hours id read. I would suggest people boycott low cost operators that clearly put profit before safety. But i know people won't.
The only question I guess is, does this sort of thing happen with the bigger operators like Cathy, BA etc..



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 07:08 PM
link   
a reply to: 3danimator2014

Commuter airlines are horrible for this, and worse. There are horror stories out there that would keep at least some people from every flying again. Heh.



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 10:27 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Zaphod58, I have a friend who is a pilot for a Commuter Airline. He is always tired,overworked and he told me the pay is really low. I would think a pilot flying hundreds of people around each day should be paid more money then any doctor. A doctor saves how many lives per year? I don't know. I trust the pilot when I fly. As I would a doctor if I have a problem.

We pay so much money for a ticket to fly and now we pay for luggage and on some airlines you have to pay a premium for a better seat. Airlines make a huge profit. Delta made 1.5 billion in 2015 profit after paying taxes. I would think with all the money they make paying a pilot a decent amount of money would not be a big deal. IMO.
edit on 3 22 2016 by Quantum12 because: Add



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 10:31 PM
link   
a reply to: buddah6

THANK-YOU for that thorough reply, Buddah6. This captain was so experienced, its hard to believe that he'd not err on the side of safety. But then again, his experience could have made him over confident.



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 10:40 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: carewemust

When an aircraft stalls the nose drops, just like you see there.

This was a 747 freighter taking off in Afghanistan. One of the MRAPs they were carrying shifted aft, causing them to stall, and crash.

youtu.be...

That's exactly what this aircraft did.


Wow..that's a surreal video. If the weight shifted to the back of that 747, why didn't it stall and go down TAIL first?? The people who loaded the plane must feel really bad!



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 10:49 PM
link   
a reply to: carewemust

Because the wing is what stalls. The aircraft is still going forward, but the wing isn't generating any lift anymore. So the nose drops, regardless of if the center of gravity shifts back or the nose is pulled up too high.

This is what happens when the wing stalls.



Once you reach that point, the nose drops, and the aircraft falls. If you have enough altitude, you regain forward speed, your wing generates lift again, and you pull the nose up and start flying again. If you're low, as in the FlyDubai and Atlas crashes, you don't have enough time to get the nose down, and start flying again.



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 10:56 PM
link   
a reply to: carewemust
That viedo is so sad. I think what happened the weight shifted to the tail but with the forward momentum it caused the nose up tail down and the plane looks like it lost lift. Without air flowing over the wings it went down. Sad

edit on 3 22 2016 by Quantum12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 11:02 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58


OK...I think I understand. No matter how much weight is at the back of the plane, the nose will drop after the stall point. The physics of it is over my head, but I understand what you said. Thanks for the illustrations, too. They always help!


This is exactly what I see at the Chicago air show, but the Blue Angels are high enough over Lake Michigan to recover from the self-inflicted stalls and zoom back up after the nose points down. Fascinating to watch.

I wonder how much height a cargo 747 would need to have to avoid crashing? There's not much a pilot can do to train for low altitude stalls is there..



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 11:21 PM
link   
a reply to: carewemust

They train at high altitude for stalls. Any time a new plane flies, part of the test program is stall recovery. Normally it doesn't take long to recover from the stall, but at the altitudes these two planes were at, there isn't long to recover. But it depends on speed, weight on board, and several other factors.

747 stall test:



787 stall test:




edit on 3/22/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 11:31 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58


Very informative clips, Zaphod58. Thanx! It looks like they're pretty conservative with the stall tests. I suppose that's all for the best, when lives and millions of $$$ of equipment is at stake.


I live a few miles from Ohare (Chicago) airport. Even after seeing thousands of take-offs and landings over the years, it's still fun to watch how they line up at night for miles. And in heavy winds they planes have that weird side-skew, just like the Dreamliner in that third video. Thanks again for sharing these, Zaphod58.



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 11:35 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Great clips. Not the hair cut place. I wonder if the stall tests are done without weight or do they add weight to the plane or does it matter?



posted on Mar, 22 2016 @ 11:43 PM
link   
a reply to: carewemust

It's called crabbing. If the aircraft were to fly straight, the crosswind would push them sideways. So there are two ways to correct for that. You can either drop one wing slightly into that wind, which keeps you going straight, or you point your nose into that wind, and fly sideways until just before you touch down. Once you're close to the runway, you kick the rudder, straighten up, and land.

Or in some aircraft, like the B-52 and 747, they design the landing gear to turn up to about 10-15 degrees off straight. So you turn the fuselage into the wind, and the landing gear lines up straight with the runway.

Then you end up with something like this that really freaks you out when you see it.



This is another example of a stall. This was a B-52 in Washington in 1994. The pilot had a history of hot dogging in B-52s, but was allowed to continue flying. He was practicing for an airshow, and when he made a turn, he rolled the aircraft so far, that one wing lost lift, and stopped flying, they nosed over and crashed.




new topics

top topics



 
24
<< 5  6  7    9  10  11 >>

log in

join