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The last job on Earth: imagining a fully automated world [VIDEO]

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posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 06:18 PM
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Hello ATS,

This issue has been on my mind for years now. I am fascinated with technological progression and it's exponential growth in both advancement, as well as rate of advancement. It's incredible and terrifying at the same time.

Incredible, because we will see inventions so incredible that they would have been considered magic 100 years ago, and 50 years ago, and 10 years ago and soon to be last year, all within our lifetime, and eventually occurring so regularly that the rate and level of advancement wont even phase us.

Terrifying, because I have absolutely no faith in humanities ability to respectably, logically, and responsibly use and adapt to these new advancements.

One huge problem that's about to hit us is a fully automated world. It is no longer a question that we are going to lose our jobs to the machines we build, it will happen and it is happening. The question now is "how do we live in a society with no jobs?".

Many science fiction writers have posited concepts on how this would be feasible, and although they too are equally fascinating, the transition is what's going to kill us; potentially.

Here's a short video on the subject I'm talking about






The Guardian recently released an animated short set in a time when machines dominate the workforce. The story follows the last human worker going on with their average day. Most other humans seen are lining the streets in poverty, as empty high-rise apartment buildings line the skies. The short is beautifully depicted, but has frightening implications.

According to Moshe Vardi, professor of computer science at Rice University: “Machines could take 50% of jobs in the next 30 years.” And Andy Haldane, Bank of England chief economist, notes, “Machines are already undertaking tasks which were unthinkable—if not unimaginable—a decade ago.”


However, there is another point of view that many of you may hold:



Even as automation takes over many of today’s jobs—new opportunities may also appear as a result. And these jobs of the future may be much more meaningful for everybody.

“The light at the end of this tunnel,” writes Vivek Wadhwa, “may be a world in which the pursuit of enlightenment is more cherished than the pursuit of money.”

While extreme utopian and dystopian views ordinarily dominate the conversation, the possibility of a middle scenario appearing may be just as likely. And maybe the next generation of “jobs” will empower humans instead of devaluing them.

S. Vollie Osborn offers another fresh perspective: “The developments and innovations produced by passion, and aided by technology, have stretched the imagination. From the realization of many concepts formerly considered science fiction, to the creation of new forms of art, we already stand in awe of what passion and innovation can achieve.”

link to quotes

Although I do not believe we will totally rid ourselves of every single job, I do believe that we will rid ourselves of so many jobs that it could easily cause societal collapses unless we build a new system where jobs aren't an absolute requirement for life.

So I'm wondering; What do you think of all this? What do you think needs to be done about it? And do you think it's Achievable?




posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 06:24 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147

I think worrying about things that might happen is a waste of time. Unless you plan on going all Ted Kaczynski on technology I would recommend you sit back and enjoy the ride.



posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 06:28 PM
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There's an old science fiction story that depicts a rich class of humans who get all the good seats and are well-respected, kind of like doctors today.

They were the barbers, because no one could teach a robot to cut hair.



posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 06:32 PM
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originally posted by: Metallicus
a reply to: Ghost147

I think worrying about things that might happen is a waste of time. Unless you plan on going all Ted Kaczynski on technology I would recommend you sit back and enjoy the ride.


I don't find a lack of discussion and to simply 'let things go out untouched and unplanned' to be a very valuable form of dealing with issues



posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 06:51 PM
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originally posted by: Ghost147

originally posted by: Metallicus
a reply to: Ghost147

I think worrying about things that might happen is a waste of time. Unless you plan on going all Ted Kaczynski on technology I would recommend you sit back and enjoy the ride.


I don't find a lack of discussion and to simply 'let things go out untouched and unplanned' to be a very valuable form of dealing with issues


One of the issues here is how much this is hyperbole and how much is fact. The claim is that ALL jobs will be eliminated and EVERYONE will be unemployed.

Really?



posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 06:55 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler
One of the issues here is how much this is hyperbole and how much is fact. The claim is that ALL jobs will be eliminated and EVERYONE will be unemployed.

Really?


That's just the title of the film. I stated in the OP the following:

Although I do not believe we will totally rid ourselves of every single job, I do believe that we will rid ourselves of so many jobs that it could easily cause societal collapses unless we build a new system where jobs aren't an absolute requirement for life.



posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 07:01 PM
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The artist. The craftsman. The inventor. The repairman. Plus other functions that we can't even think of.



posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 07:10 PM
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originally posted by: Ghost147

originally posted by: schuyler
One of the issues here is how much this is hyperbole and how much is fact. The claim is that ALL jobs will be eliminated and EVERYONE will be unemployed.

Really?


That's just the title of the film. I stated in the OP the following:

Although I do not believe we will totally rid ourselves of every single job, I do believe that we will rid ourselves of so many jobs that it could easily cause societal collapses unless we build a new system where jobs aren't an absolute requirement for life.


And that itself is telling. You are suggesting that enough jobs will be eliminated to cause societal collapse. I'm suggesting that is hyperbole. About the only evidence you have is a generalized 'robotics is rapidly advancing' kind of argument. I have no doubt robotics will affect jobs, and will affect jobs negatively. But that doesn't mean society will collapse. It means jobs will change. Add to that declining populations--a phenomenon that is happening worldwide--and you just might have the opposite of what you fear. In any case, if you're going to claim the sky is falling, it's up to you to prove it really is.



posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 07:23 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147

Human beings will always have instincts. If those instincts are ALL rendered obsolete, then humanity will fly apart like a broken helicopter rotor assembly.

Many human instincts are not nearly as widely useful as they were, or at least, modern life makes them less useful, as long as that modernity continues unabated. The instinct to hunt for food, rather than merely purchase it, the instinct to build shelter, rather than relying on pre-existing shelter being available, the instinct to protect ones family, these are all necessary to the human experience, but some are becoming obsolete in certain areas on the planet.

But if nearly all natural human instinct is reduced to anachronism, then those instincts will sour and become... Well, I need not explain too much, suffice to say that many things would become suddenly on fire, that were not previously.

However, if humankind were given other things to do, because all the work was being done by machines, that might allow for a certain amount of natural instinct to kick in. If, for example, the work of machines to perform simple tasks on earth, allowed more and more people the option of going to other planets and bodies in the solar system, like The Moon, Mars, Phobos, or any of the other solid objects on which human beings could potentially set up some sort of camp or colony, that would be marvellous. You see, the one thing that human beings as a species are very good at, is exploring. We find our way into all sorts of mischief, all over the globe. The reason we are everywhere on this rock, is that we love exploring, pioneering, expanding our horizons. There is always another mountain range, always another dune, ocean, continent, depth, height, or breadth to reach the extent of. Except, of course, that there really is not always such a thing any more.

But on other worlds, colony building, mining, exploration and prospecting...that would account for an awful lot of spare instinct. Living and working on other worlds, or in space would be an awesome outlet for our instincts as a species, so although the future is bleak in many respects, with regard to employment, if it leads to a multiplanetary society, even one which might one day escape the boundary of the solar systems outer reaches...I would never say I am in favour of a job being taken from a person who needs one, but there are certain silver linings that might come about later on. It would be miserable to live in the years between automation and exploration though. Utterly miserable.
edit on 18-3-2016 by TrueBrit because: Grammatical error removed.



posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 07:28 PM
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I've wondered about it too, Ghost. Jobs will consist of building and operating robots? Someone would have to keep them operational, and invent them. I guess robots would build them.

Mercedes went to robotics, and many employees were let go. They now employee computer people to run the robots, and the starting salary was $50,000 a year, and Mercedes paid for all their training at a nearby university. It was a great job for those who were hired. Not so great for those who were fired.


“The light at the end of this tunnel,” writes Vivek Wadhwa, “may be a world in which the pursuit of enlightenment is more cherished than the pursuit of money.”


If only enlightenment could fill an empty stomach, yes? When I was younger, I also thought people would seek "awards" like a Pulitzer Prize, and it would be more coveted than money. Now I realize very little is more coveted than money, but we have to have money! It seems the more people have, the more they want.

But I wonder how it all will work. I can't imagine not having work in my life. Of course I could always attend to my hobbies, but my hobbies aren't always free.

I need a sense of purpose, and accomplishment to feel whole.



posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 07:28 PM
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I don't need a job now.

Guess I'm just ahead of the curve.



posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: corvuscorrax

Congratulations, I too have a couple of jobs that I love, but I'm acutely aware that there are people outside of me who aren't so lucky. I can think of few things worse than not having a job, and the income and satisfaction it brings.

I wish everyone could find the job they want and deserve.



posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 07:40 PM
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originally posted by: ladyinwaiting
a reply to: corvuscorrax

Congratulations, I too have a couple of jobs that I love, but I'm acutely aware that there are people outside of me who aren't so lucky. I can think of few things worse than not having a job, and the income and satisfaction it brings.

I wish everyone could find the job they want and deserve.



Always fun to see those who pretty much hold polar opposite views.

I can think of few things worse than having a job.

Was always my way though. Learned very quickly that I wanted nothing to do with people or the things they do in general. You could offer me a great job with competitive pay and benefits and I'd laugh in your face.
edit on 2016-03-18T19:47:25-05:002016Fri, 18 Mar 2016 19:47:25 -0500v000000252016-03-18T19:47:25-05:002016Fri, 18 Mar 2016 19:47:25 -0500Fri, 18 Mar 2016 19:47:25 -0500 by corvuscorrax because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 07:45 PM
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i could see a time when cheap fusion , extrem ai, and robotics could eliminate near all manufacturing and base service jobs in the world. My problem I am not smart enough to see what kind of economy emergages and what kind of drive the human race keeps for progressing then. A world where human don't need to do much and live a very very long time could be a scary place. Or a great place like I said I'm not smart enough to see how the out come looks.



posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 08:26 PM
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Automation is the next big evolution of society but a world with no jobs doesn't work along with capitalism...

We'll have to choose between evolution or capitalism...choose, I meant fight.



posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 08:52 PM
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originally posted by: Teikiatsu
The artist. The craftsman. The inventor. The repairman. Plus other functions that we can't even think of.

This is a good list of jobs that robot's couldn't easily take over. I would ad, tree workers, chefs, healthcare workers and care providers, veterinarians.

I guess if the science of AI and perfecting robots got super duper advanced, I imagine a world where the only job left is robot/android building and maintenance.

I can't seem to think that an android with AI so advanced as to that of a scientist, would be created to take away those in the fields of science that do the heavy thinking when it comes to solutions of our problems like the good folks who study Marine Biology.

I'm not sure why we would have this sort of future. When human beings have perfectly good minds of their own, why would we need to create a substitute AI for the things humans think or do?

I'm brought to mind the Movie, Surrogates, where people don't ever even have to leave their home, they have surrogate androids live in the world for them.

I also can see only the elite, rich would navigate a world where humans don't have to do much other than create art and think about things.

Interesting OP!



posted on Mar, 19 2016 @ 03:03 AM
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originally posted by: Ghost147

One huge problem that's about to hit us is a fully automated world. It is no longer a question that we are going to lose our jobs to the machines we build, it will happen and it is happening. The question now is "how do we live in a society with no jobs?".




The Guardian recently released an animated short set in a time when machines dominate the workforce. The story follows the last human worker going on with their average day. Most other humans seen are lining the streets in poverty, as empty high-rise apartment buildings line the skies. The short is beautifully depicted, but has frightening implications.

According to Moshe Vardi, professor of computer science at Rice University: “Machines could take 50% of jobs in the next 30 years.” And Andy Haldane, Bank of England chief economist, notes, “Machines are already undertaking tasks which were unthinkable—if not unimaginable—a decade ago.”


However, there is another point of view that many of you may hold:

While extreme utopian and dystopian views ordinarily dominate the conversation, the possibility of a middle scenario appearing may be just as likely. And maybe the next generation of “jobs” will empower humans instead of devaluing them.

I do believe that we will rid ourselves of so many jobs that it could easily cause societal collapses unless we build a new system where jobs aren't an absolute requirement for life.

So I'm wondering; What do you think of all this? What do you think needs to be done about it? And do you think it's Achievable?


I an remember these sort of discussions taking place on TV in Australia in the 1970's and it was canvassed that one solution was to pay some people not to work or for the whole workforce to work less hours etc.

These days, many are doing their level best to make welfare for individuals a dirty word. In fact I read much and see much on TV that tells me that they demonising welfare for individuals. ( and I thought hate speech was a crime these days)

It has occurred to me a number of times before today that demonising welfare for individuals and the growing realisation that most of the population are going to be put out of jobs by robots, is in fact connected despite it also being ideologically driven.

While some jobs will be created by robotics, the same thing was said about computers when it obvious that computers were automating and deleting many jobs. Somehow I don't feel comfortable accepting claims that this has been the case.

The thing about robotics is that they will replace virtually all manual labour jobs. The people who work in these jobs are also the same people who have a higher likelihood to claim and perhaps repeatedly claim welfare in their lives.

On the other hand executives are the least likely to be replaced by robots and they are also the people least likely to claim welfare payments. Putting this kind of 2 and 2 together what do you come up with?




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