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Anhedonia? I don't feel much.

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posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 09:12 PM
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Hey ATS members - Some of you know me by now, from other forums, and some of you don't...

Here to ask what any of you have done for.. Apathy, I suppose.

It's pretty much been life-long. I'm not sad - I'm actually quite happy. Just disinterested.

Pretty much lack emotions and feelings towards things. Gaming doesn't interest me, low desire for intimacy, low desire for most things...

What should I do?




posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 09:14 PM
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Hmmm, I was going to say it could be mild depression, but you said you are happy.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 09:19 PM
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a reply to: Night Star

Well, if you dive into depression, there's different types which are based on different chemicals within the brain. I have the assumption that my .. issue? Is dopamine related. I have compulsive and addictive... Hmm, tendencies I suppose. I don't do drugs, gamble, etc - But the impulsiveness to do such things is there, and it takes more effort than I wish to stay away from things.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 09:23 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope

I don't know exactly what you should do, but it sounds like you need a shock to the system. Good or bad. A major, once-or-twice in a lifetime kind of vacation, skydive, i can't think of other examples at the moment, but a jump-start for your neurotransmitters.

And/or - look into a diet/supplements to support dopamine production, as well as overall health. What you're feeling sounds to me like something is causing your reward/pleasure centers to have a tough time firing as they should.

I wouldn't recommend drugs -legal or otherwise- they'll just make the problem worse long-term.

ETA: I was writing this before seeing your post just above mine refresh to the screen, so yeah, from one not-doctor to another not-doctor, as a second opinion, I concur with your diagnosis. There's a handful of supplements which are supposed to be helpful for dopamine support. It's quite possible you naturally have a lower number of receptors, or dopamine production. Either way, I'd give it a try.
edit on 3/16/2016 by dogstar23 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 09:34 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope

Have you seen a doctor? Being a life long thing, it is sad to see you suffer when you don't have to.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: Night Star

Not really suffering when I don't care.

I do have some desire to care - To feel something about it, but it's not like it ruins my life. It's a little bit on and off, mostly on.

I once did take a medication, thought about doing it again. Really mild, mostly safe stuff. Wellbutrin.
edit on 16-3-2016 by deadlyhope because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 09:38 PM
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a reply to: dogstar23

I went on Wellbutrin - Bupropion Hydrochloride for a few weeks, I should have given it more of a chance, but I didn't care to.. Oops, the apathy got in the way of curing the apathy perhaps = /

It's known to be really mild, but particularly good at sensitizing dopamine response.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 09:44 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope


The thing with any med is to find the right one at the right dose. I do wish you all the best and hope you find a solution soon.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 09:54 PM
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a reply to: Night Star

Thank you!



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 10:22 PM
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Have you had your genetics done? A coding error on the MTHfR gene could be the problem. B12 breaks down to the neurotransmitters seratonin, dopamine, melatonin, epinephrine and others. I happen to have a double error on that gene.
Seems the B12 in itself is not so bad but adding an inability to breakdown folic acid into folate makes it a problem.

I happen to have a coding error for B12 which is not so bad in itself but there is also an error on the same gene that slows/inhibits the ability to break down folic acid into folate. That make the B12 a problem. Surprisingly about 20% of the population have this same error.

I have struggled with various degrees of depression all my life (have had a very stressful life from childhood). Only the first time did an antidepressent help me. It was called Sinequan which actually replaces the seratonin. As it happens genetic testing told me that I don't respond to 6 of the 7 groups of antidepressents given. The other on hasn't been tested.


Serotonin acts as a neurotransmitter, a type of chemical that helps relay signals from one area of the brain to another. ... This includes brain cells related to mood, sexual desire and function, appetite, sleep, memory and learning, temperature regulation, and some social behavior.


WebMd
Considering that this is life long, you might want to be tested. If you are interested in genealogy test on ftdna or ancestry. 23 and me costs more. Then you can upload your results to a program that tells you where you may have problems.

I have much empathy for you having dealt with this so long. I wouldn't wish this on anyone.

BTW, I took the Sinequan when I was 26. The results were dramatic and I knew I had been depressed all my life.
I am 70 now and just don't care.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 11:51 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope

paintball! its REAL fun



posted on Mar, 17 2016 @ 12:04 AM
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a reply to: liveandlearn

I haven't, it's definitely a thought, thanks for mentioning it!

Old serotonin boosting drugs were actually monoanime oxidase inhibitors. Mao is actually the chemical or process by which serotonin is depleted, so you're essentially lessening how much is depleted - now days most use selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, which more controls the reabsorption of serotonin.

I believe my problem to be dopamine related. I could be wrong, but I feel more apathy, lethargy, lack of energy. Less suicidal thoughts, mood swings, and sadness.

I should get checked out, I've just lost most faith in medical doctors as they are too friendly with big pharma.



posted on Mar, 17 2016 @ 12:15 AM
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originally posted by: deadlyhope
a reply to: liveandlearn

I haven't, it's definitely a thought, thanks for mentioning it!

Old serotonin boosting drugs were actually monoanime oxidase inhibitors. Mao is actually the chemical or process by which serotonin is depleted, so you're essentially lessening how much is depleted - now days most use selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, which more controls the reabsorption of serotonin.

I believe my problem to be dopamine related. I could be wrong, but I feel more apathy, lethargy, lack of energy. Less suicidal thoughts, mood swings, and sadness.

I should get checked out, I've just lost most faith in medical doctors as they are too friendly with big pharma.


The med I took was not an MAO, it came after. SSRI are nothing but drugs to keep you hooked on them. If you are depleted of serotonin how will an SSRI help if it is just recycling what you have left.

Dopamine and serotonin are both happy drugs. I don't know if one effects the other but it is possible.

I understand your lack of faith in Dr as I am right there with you. You really have to do your own research. Everytime I mention to my Dr about depression he hands me a packet of the latest greatest which I take home and throw away. I said no SSRI's and he hands me an SSRI. Doesn't know what he's doing.



posted on Mar, 17 2016 @ 12:28 AM
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a reply to: liveandlearn

Turkey is famous for tryptophan, and carbohydrates are also building blocks of serotonin, which is actually called 5-hydroxytryptophan.

St John's wort works similar to an ssri but is not deemed as being as dangerous. It's an herb that actually has trials backing it and such. Certain b vitamins are also known to help with different forms of depression.

I've read that levels of different chemicals do impact each other to a degree.

I like your signature by the way. I always maintain that I can change my mind on any issue if information previously unknown to me comes around and shows me my old view was faulty.



posted on Mar, 17 2016 @ 07:59 AM
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I have a mentor, older guy, that I really look up to. He occasionally teaches lessons at the church I attend. He has the most beautiful mind, and there aren't many people I'd rather have a conversation with. One day, in passing, he mentioned having suffered from anhedonia. I was intrigued, had never heard of it, then went home and looked it up. I was stumped, and very surprised, not only that he suffered from this (I couldn't tell, but he was a man of few words), but that he so openly mentioned it in front of a large group of people.

I've since spoken to him a little more on that subject. I've been open about my mental health struggles (anxiety and depression) and he has asked me if I ever tried medication. He said he found relief with pharmaceuticals as well, and that while once he thought he needed to just struggle through it and tough it out, he now knows that some people do need drug intervention.



posted on Mar, 17 2016 @ 09:11 AM
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a reply to: chelsdh

It's interesting how individual our emotions and feelings and such are. There's hundreds if not more remedies for different forms and levels of depression, anxiety, bipolar, ocd, and many more. It's crazy to think that of all things, that is the way in which we are most unique. Our minds. Not only psychologically, but physiologically as well.

I do wish you well in your own challenges.



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