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Can autiats get Headache?

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posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 11:41 AM
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Recently i noticed that if i turn my brain off while having headache, it stops.

Under turning off i mean stop thinking stop acting myself and just be an empty shell that does not think but just understands. I stop paying attention to the world unless caled. I do weird things and say things that i should be thinking about them and not saying. Basicaly my intelingence dissapears.

So anyway when i do that my head stops hurting so i was thinking.. Do people with severe form of Autism get headaches?




posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 11:47 AM
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I used to get a real lot of headaches before. I learned what was triggering most of them now though. Shutting down your thinking means you are slowing electrical impulses. I used to like to go out into the woods or fish by a lake with very little fish in it when I had a headache. Going where fish are always biting is stressful.

I have no clue whether someone with autism would get headaches. They still have a good brain, in fact some are really smart but suck at social interaction.
edit on 16-3-2016 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: ZeroFurrbone

Do people with severe form of Autism get headaches?

Life is pretty much one big headache for those with sever autism, isn't it? But they probably get 'normal' headaches, too.

As far as that cure you worked up for yours, good for you. Much better that way than having to take something. The way you make it sound, stress from worrying to much, spinning things up in your head, making mountains of mole hills as it were.

Just relax, empty your head. What is the mechanics you use, so others can emulate it? Do you find a quiet room, sit, close your eyes, what?



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 11:52 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

I just turn myself "off"

i dont need to be somewhere quiet or sitting. I just stop paying attention to anything fully relax my body and do whatever it wants. Main aspect is to empty your head and stop thinking yet to be able to respond if necesary.

Usually my face expression changes and i have trouble closing my mouth
edit on 16-3-2016 by ZeroFurrbone because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 11:56 AM
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originally posted by: ZeroFurrbone
a reply to: intrptr

I just turn myself "off"

i dont need to be somewhere quiet or sitting. I just stop paying attention to anything fully relax my body and do whatever it wants. Main aspect is to empty your hear and stop thinking yet to be able to respond if necesary


Ahhh, kind of auto pilot? Thats a neat trick. If I do that, I might forget what I'm doing. But I don't get many headaches (knock on wood).

Is what you are describing ignoring whats going on around you but still staying focused on what you're doing? Like others stressing you, turning that off?

Also healthy.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 12:01 PM
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a reply to: intrptr


yes. if there are others around you, you can still hear them but .. it is like they are really far away.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: intrptr


but i dont do it much xD i am kind of scared of losing myself. When i go "off" i am like a different person and that scares me



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 12:06 PM
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originally posted by: ZeroFurrbone
a reply to: intrptr


yes. if there are others around you, you can still hear them but .. it is like they are really far away.


Like a switch huh? Neatability. Some do it with drugs, drink or headphones. Be careful you don't practice that so much you become permanently unaware of your surroundings.

Pretending not to hear others is what my nephew is doing right now. He plays his I pod and watches tv but if you call his name he pretends not to hear you. Call him again louder and he goes, huh? He hears you, just doesn't want to. I don't blame him, his world sucks.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 12:09 PM
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originally posted by: ZeroFurrbone
a reply to: intrptr

but i dont do it much xD i am kind of scared of losing myself. When i go "off" i am like a different person and that scares me

That is a little different. Are you saying your body acts on its own and you are just observing? From where, inside your head, through your eyes or outside looking at yourself?

Does your body do things you… wouldn't do normally?



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 12:54 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: ZeroFurrbone
a reply to: intrptr


yes. if there are others around you, you can still hear them but .. it is like they are really far away.


Like a switch huh? Neatability. Some do it with drugs, drink or headphones. Be careful you don't practice that so much you become permanently unaware of your surroundings.

Pretending not to hear others is what my nephew is doing right now. He plays his I pod and watches tv but if you call his name he pretends not to hear you. Call him again louder and he goes, huh? He hears you, just doesn't want to. I don't blame him, his world sucks.


My daughter has autism, she often doesn't hear people when shes got her head in a book or watching tv etc, they go into their own little world. I find if I don't get her attention the first time a sharp loud bang does the trick, a lot of kids with autism are scared of loud bangs, seems horrible but after years you get fed up of saying her name 10 times to get her attention, you should see her freak out if I pop a balloon, mean daddy



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: ZeroFurrbone

I have Asperger syndrome, which is considered to be in the autistic spectrum, and I get killer migraines.

I am fairly sure that those with autism can get headaches. Headaches are usually caused by a reduction in oxygenation to the scalp and meninges, the brain itself has no sensory nerves.

I would see autism as alternate (to the norm) functioning of the higher brain and therefore completely physically separate to headache mechanisms.

What I suspect in your case is that you have discovered transcendental meditation and its effect upon endorphin release, relaxation of muscles and constriction of blood vessels (which speeds the flow and brings oxygenated blood into the area).

edit on 16/3/2016 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 02:16 PM
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a reply to: ZeroFurrbone

As a clinically diagnosed high-functioning autism sufferer (bit of a misnomer, I'm not suffering at all) all I can do is unleash a facepalm of divine proportions at this thread. As a migraine and cluster headache sufferer.
No way.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 05:51 PM
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originally posted by: TigStar82

originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: ZeroFurrbone
a reply to: intrptr


yes. if there are others around you, you can still hear them but .. it is like they are really far away.


Like a switch huh? Neatability. Some do it with drugs, drink or headphones. Be careful you don't practice that so much you become permanently unaware of your surroundings.

Pretending not to hear others is what my nephew is doing right now. He plays his I pod and watches tv but if you call his name he pretends not to hear you. Call him again louder and he goes, huh? He hears you, just doesn't want to. I don't blame him, his world sucks.


My daughter has autism, she often doesn't hear people when shes got her head in a book or watching tv etc, they go into their own little world. I find if I don't get her attention the first time a sharp loud bang does the trick, a lot of kids with autism are scared of loud bangs, seems horrible but after years you get fed up of saying her name 10 times to get her attention, you should see her freak out if I pop a balloon, mean daddy

Yes you are, meany. My dad used to squeeeeak balloons near me and then pop them. My mom said it made me cry. What_a_dick.

But I get the impatient thing. Thing is you have to keep patient with kids no matter how many times it takes. Try gently touching her to get her attention. She'll respond.

And stop making loud noises to 'teach her a lesson'!

(scold off)



posted on Mar, 17 2016 @ 05:42 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

I do things i would normally not do if i was thinking about them. For istance i would look at a cat and say : "meow cute kitten." I would not do that usually.

Real me is much more dense. I am serious and inteligent. Understand allot of things and talk about them.

But when i am off it is like i am a diffetent person that does not care about anything. A person that does not know anything and likes to focus on simple tasks way more than he should. Someone who taps in the deepest desires no matter how innocent and silly.



posted on Mar, 17 2016 @ 01:23 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: TigStar82

originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: ZeroFurrbone
a reply to: intrptr


yes. if there are others around you, you can still hear them but .. it is like they are really far away.


Like a switch huh? Neatability. Some do it with drugs, drink or headphones. Be careful you don't practice that so much you become permanently unaware of your surroundings.

Pretending not to hear others is what my nephew is doing right now. He plays his I pod and watches tv but if you call his name he pretends not to hear you. Call him again louder and he goes, huh? He hears you, just doesn't want to. I don't blame him, his world sucks.


My daughter has autism, she often doesn't hear people when shes got her head in a book or watching tv etc, they go into their own little world. I find if I don't get her attention the first time a sharp loud bang does the trick, a lot of kids with autism are scared of loud bangs, seems horrible but after years you get fed up of saying her name 10 times to get her attention, you should see her freak out if I pop a balloon, mean daddy

Yes you are, meany. My dad used to squeeeeak balloons near me and then pop them. My mom said it made me cry. What_a_dick.

But I get the impatient thing. Thing is you have to keep patient with kids no matter how many times it takes. Try gently touching her to get her attention. She'll respond.

And stop making loud noises to 'teach her a lesson'!

(scold off)


I should have explained a little better, she finds it funny after the initial freak out plus I made the mistake of teaching her to box from a young age, one hell on a right hook and a pretty good left jab, she has autism (and cerebral palsy) but shes a tough cookie, trust me I learn my lesson if I'm ever a proper mean daddy

If I really want to be mean I wait tho til after parties when the rooms full of ballons and just let my dog loose, he loves playing with balloons, record was 30 popped in 6 seconds, like a machine gun
hehe
edit on 17-3-2016 by TigStar82 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2016 @ 01:52 PM
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a reply to: TigStar82

Your dogs a "Party Pooper", sorry couldn't resist.



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