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What does it look like inside a black hole (video)

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posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 07:57 PM
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I was on my daily browse and came across this video that tries to describe what it would look like inside of a black hole. Its fun trying to fully follow what's being explained, so I figured I'd throw it your guys way to enjoy. Definitely one of the more interesting videos I've come across recently.


A weaver of dreams at the loom of the mind




posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: DimensionalChange03


So make it short for other posters:



They don't know. There, I saved you 4 minutes.



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 08:09 PM
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a reply to: DimensionalChange03

Not that they will ever be able to prove it, but I am pretty sure it is completely dark and devoid of light so it is most likely ummm, black.



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 08:18 PM
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a reply to: DimensionalChange03

The real answer to that question is they don't really know. Theres time lapse video of stars moving around the center of the Milky Way. In the images the 'object' they are orbiting is invisible. No one has gotten close enough to see what it looks like close up. The best description is like watching water go over a water fall. From a point above the falls you see the water flow to the edge and go over, disappearing beyond the "event horizon". Light approaches the edge of the void and falls over the edge.

Heres a graphic of the time lapse images taken of the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. Theres 'nothing' there.
The best way to resolve one of these invisible immensities is to observe it feeding on something, generating light that can be seen.



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 08:43 PM
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a reply to: DimensionalChange03

Also interesting...I just stumbled across this video about something shooting out of a black hole!

Object shoots out of a black hole
From the article:



Two of NASA’s space telescopes, including the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), miraculously observed a black hole’s corona “launched” away from the supermassive black hole. Then a massive pulse of X-ray energy spewed out. So, what exactly happened? That’s what scientists are trying to figure out now.

“This is the first time we have been able to link the launching of the corona to a flare,” Dan Wilkins, of Saint Mary’s University, said. “This will help us understand how supermassive black holes power some of the brightest objects in the universe.”


What do we really know about what we thought we knew about space?



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 03:32 AM
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originally posted by: FelisOrion
a reply to: DimensionalChange03


So make it short for other posters:



They don't know. There, I saved you 4 minutes.


Thanks for that, I've gone off watching videos these days.

So many people just want to get their face on the TV screen. I cant stand 10 minute videos of UFO s that show 10 - 20 seconds of UFO. The rest is just talking heads telling us all about it and getting their face on the video.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 03:40 AM
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a reply to: DimensionalChange03

Yepp thats it, im gonna go for a hike and watch some birds..



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 07:56 AM
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originally posted by: NewzNose
a reply to: DimensionalChange03

Also interesting...I just stumbled across this video about something shooting out of a black hole!

Object shoots out of a black hole
From the article:



Two of NASA’s space telescopes, including the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), miraculously observed a black hole’s corona “launched” away from the supermassive black hole. Then a massive pulse of X-ray energy spewed out. So, what exactly happened? That’s what scientists are trying to figure out now.

“This is the first time we have been able to link the launching of the corona to a flare,” Dan Wilkins, of Saint Mary’s University, said. “This will help us understand how supermassive black holes power some of the brightest objects in the universe.”


What do we really know about what we thought we knew about space?


The writer of this blog article confused the issue here by adding something along the lines of "I thought nothing escapes black holes; so what's up with that?!", but that may be only because the writer doesn't fully understand what the mystery is, nor understand what is known about black holes. Scientists are NOT saying that stuff is escaping the grips of the black hole itself -- just from the stuff around the black hole.

Here is a better article about the X-ray pulse from black hole Markarian 335 in which the author seems to have more knowledge about black hole research:

astronomynow.com...


As I mentioned above, the X-ray pulse being emitted from the corona is NOT the same as saying that it came from within the black hole. When I say "within", I mean inside the event horizon.

Jets of energy (such as X-rays) have been observed coming from black holes for decades. A Quasar is such an event. Some of these jets emanate from the accretion disk of material swirling around a black hole, waiting to get sucked in. The black hole's gravity causes this accretion disk of material to swirl so fast that ultra-massive amounts of friction are built up in the accretion disk, and that friction causes energy that is release in the form of X-ray jets. These jets emanate from the disk along the direction of the axis of spin.

Granted, nothing can escape a black hole -- but that is within the event horizon. Once something crosses over that threshold of the event horizon, it is hopelessly lost to the gravity of the black hole. So the event horizon should actually be considered the true boundary of the black hole. Stuff swirling around the accretion disk outside that event horizon certainly does feel the gravity of the black hole, but that material is NOT hopelessly bound to the gravity of the black hole. Instead, it is possible for something in the accretion disk to escape...

...e.g., If you had a spaceship with a powerful enough engine (and be structurally strong enough to survive the gravity, but that's beside the point), you could escape the area outside the event horizon, such as where the accretion disk is. However, if you were inside the event horizon, there is not enough energy in the universe that would allow your spaceship to escape. That's the difference between "inside and outside the event horizon".

Having said that, the specific cause of this X-ray pulse is a mystery. This X-ray pulse is still thought to be emitted from the corona outside the event horizon, so it isn't coming form the black hole itself (it isn't being emitted from inside the event horizon), but the specific cause of this X-ray pulse is the mystery, since it is different than the jets of X-rays that are usually associated with the spinning accretion disk outside of a black hole.




To go further here , a question that might pop up is "what is Hawking radiation? Isn't THAT something that escapes a black hole?". The answer is that Hawking radiation is not true material that was once sucked into the black hole that is now radiating away. Instead this is a simplified explanation for Hawking radiation:

Hawking radiation is not exactly the radiating away of the actual material that fell into a black hole; it instead works in a more indirect way. In Hawking radiation, an entangled pair of virtual particles pop into existence near a black hole (a particle plus its anti-particle). One of those particles crosses over the event horizon and gets caught in the gravity of the Black hole, while the other does not cross the event horizon, and it escapes. Due to the conservation of total energy, the one that fell in would be negative energy, causing the black hole to lose one particles worth of energy, while the other entangled positive particle is left over, appearing (but only appearing) to have been radiated from the black hole.

So even Hawking radiation is not exactly something finding its way out of the grasp of a black hole.

edit on 3/16/2016 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 08:21 AM
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Double post. See post above.


edit on 3/16/2016 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 10:08 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

An article from NASA should be credible and succinct in info, right? Are you saying NASA is incorrect?



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 10:48 AM
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I would love to believe inside a BH looks something like that in the movie "Interstellar"




posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 10:57 AM
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originally posted by: NewzNose
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

An article from NASA should be credible and succinct in info, right? Are you saying NASA is incorrect?

Your link was from "blastr.com", not NASA. Furthermore, the article in your link wasn't written by someone from NASA, but by someone from blastr.com -- and it seems that the writer from blastr misinterpreted the information from NASA.

The article I linked in my post (from astronomynow.com) was just an identical copy of the original article from NASA, so it was more accurate than the article written by the guy from blastr.com. Here is the NASA article about the Markanian 335 black hole flare:

Black Hole Has Major Flare

If you read this article (or the astronomynow.com one) you will see that it is devoid of the language from the blastr.com article that says something like [paraphrasing] "OMG! I thought nothing can escape a black hole!!". That's because the real NASA information is that X-ray flares from Markanian 335 are NOT coming from within the black hole itself, but from the corona near (but outside of) the black hole itself/event horizon, and from the disk of material around (and outside of) the actual black hole itself/event horizon.

That distinction is what the writer from blastr.com seemed to misunderstand.

edit on 3/16/2016 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 11:18 AM
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originally posted by: FelisOrion
a reply to: DimensionalChange03


So make it short for other posters:



They don't know. There, I saved you 4 minutes.

We don't know a lot about the universe, but we can guess and predict a lot too. Do you have a problem with that? Using computer modelling and mathematical predictions is a big part of our lives in the modern world. If you can't understand or appreciate that, then that's your problem.

~~~

Now, to comment on the video and the subject of an observer falling into a black hole:

A black hole isn't an object like you'd imagine a huge drop of black ink to be. Going into the event horizon will not surround you with blackness. In fact, to an in-falling observer, the event horizon will appear to recede before him all the way to the singularity. Above him, the universe will continulously blue-shift and speed up in time. Although the video mentions that the visible part of spectrum will shift into UV (and thus become invisible), the observer will be able to see infrared, microwave, and radio "light" from the universe.

The thought that the observer, looking out, will see all of the universe's future, is quite astounding, though.
edit on 16-3-2016 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 05:26 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People


Granted, nothing can escape a black hole -- but that is within the event horizon.

Suns supernova, wonder if black holes do, too?

Really Big Bangs forming new galaxies or even clusters of galaxies? So many forms of Galaxy exist out there, they must represent various stages of their life span, just like suns, except on a more massive scale.

A galaxy could absorb several others over its life span and when it becomes too big for even a galactic sized Black hole, it lets fly, first from the poles and then "Quasar".

These are the brightest objects in the Universe. A super nova from a star lasts a few days or weeks, a galactic super nova is how long?

We can't begin to fathom the time lapse of these life cycles. Everything else is born and dies, galaxies must too.

Oh and I agree, the X-ray pulses are from feeding at the equator. But the polar jets are from within the event horizon, gravity is weaker at the poles.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 05:39 PM
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originally posted by: Skywatcher2011
I would love to believe inside a BH looks something like that in the movie "Interstellar"

Sci fi. I'll tell you what the inside of a black hole looks like… nothing. A hole in space. If you got to close you would enter and become nothing, too.

Maybe, if you could get close enough, and it passed in front of a star, you could see the hole if you were in the right position… it might look like this.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 05:45 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: Skywatcher2011
I would love to believe inside a BH looks something like that in the movie "Interstellar"

Sci fi. I'll tell you what the inside of a black hole looks like… nothing. A hole in space. If you got to close you would enter and become nothing, too.

Maybe, if you could get close enough, and it passed in front of a star, you could see the hole if you were in the right position… it might look like this.



There would be a tremendous gravitational lensing effect, so the light from objects behind the black hole would be visible in a heavily distorted halo around the black hole.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 05:55 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Then how do we account for the invisibility of the object they resolved at the center of our Milky Way? To me it appears totally invisible. Shouldn't there be a ring of light around the object when stars pass close by?



posted on Mar, 17 2016 @ 11:20 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Then how do we account for the invisibility of the object they resolved at the center of our Milky Way? To me it appears totally invisible. Shouldn't there be a ring of light around the object when stars pass close by?

Fist of all, that video is a CGI animation, secondly, the black hole at our galaxy's centre is too far away to be actually resolved.
edit on 17-3-2016 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2016 @ 01:40 PM
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Its CGI from the time lapse photos, taken over a span of years, I think. They were trying to resolve the object, only seeing the stars. If the black hole was visible at all it would have shown up.

But it doesn't show up, because its a void in space. Those are tight orbits around whatever is there. The event horizon is where light disappears, falls over the edge.

Edit: There is nothing there to "resolve".

edit on 17-3-2016 by intrptr because: Edit:




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