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Oldest ever human genome sequence may rewrite human history

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posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 07:37 AM
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“Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.”
― Albert Einstein

This quote usually applies when we trying to discover our origins and usually find out we are most of the time




posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: spirit_horse

Is it this one you refer to?

I think it's 12,000 years old?



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 10:38 AM
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a reply to: Raggedyman
Here you go


DORSET, ENGLAND—An analysis of 30,000-year-old rabbit bones found in caves in the Iberian Peninsula suggests that rabbits were a crucial part of the modern human diet, but not in the diet of Neanderthals. “Rabbits originated in Iberia and they are a very special kind of resource, in that they can be found in large numbers, they are relatively easy to catch, and they are predictable. This means that they are quite a good food source to target. The fact that the Neanderthals did not appear to do so suggests that this was a resource they did not have access to in the same way as modern humans,” paleoecologist John Steward of Bournemouth University said in a press release. Neanderthals are usually thought of as hunters of large prey over short distances, but as the climate and environment changed and large game died out, Neanderthals may have been driven to extinction as well.


www.archaeology.org...

Rabbits originated in neaderthals home land and yet they didnt hunt them, they hunted larger and slower animals.

And this recent article about HSN diets


We have taken a detailed look at the Neanderthals’ diet,” co-author Hervé Bocherens of the Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of Tübingen said in a press release. He added that he and his team also looked at the diet of Stone Age Homo sapiens.

“In the process,” he said, “we were able to determine that the extinct relatives of today’s humans primarily fed on large herbivorous mammals, such as mammoths and woolly rhinoceroses.”

news.discovery.com...
That is not to say they didnt eat smaller animals, thjey didnt hunt them. There is good evidence that neaderthal were very good at catching nocturnal rodents, within their caves.

As for throwing over hand, i couldnt find the original paper, its over ten years old, but i found this


Projectile weaponry was an important component of early man's survival toolkit. Traces of projectile weaponry have been found in Africa dating back some 80,000 years. The mass migration by early man out of Africa into Europe some 40,000 to 50,000 years ago, show early European man developed and used bow and arrows and other projectile devices. The Rhodes/Churchill small sampling of Neanderthal's skeletal remains indicate he was outmatched by early modern man's development of a "throwing arm". This anatomical feature is measured by the degree of humeral retroversion in the dominant arm and in bilateral asymmetry.
Neanderthal's short squat body, massive limbs and lack of backward displacement at the shoulder joint may have hampered their ability to incorporate projectile weaponry. According to Jill Rhoades, an evolutionary anthropologist examinations of early modern European fossils show the backward displacement at the shoulder joint, but none of the small sampling of Neanderthal's skeletal remains carry this anatomical characteristic.



Read more at: phys.org...


So, there you go.

As to your other statements about young and old, thats just ingorant babble as you clearly have no idea what you are talking about. Because its easy to tell a persons age range through the bones.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 10:41 AM
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originally posted by: punkinworks10
a reply to: Raggedyman
Of course it looks human it is.
Although we are all "humans", Neanderthal and AMH have very different skeletons other just differnt shaped skulls.
First the larger HSN brain is due to the enlarged visual processing area to handle the low light conditions that larger eyes evolved to exploit.
HSN's shoulder was built differently from AMH, they could not throw overhand. The way their hips and lower legs are constructed meant they were good walkers but not so good runners, while AMH is built to run.
These two particlar physical traits are illustrated by HSN in their hunting habbits. They tended to larger slower animals compared to AMH, rabbits are all but missing from HSN sites, they are hard to hunt if you cant run or throw, while rabbits are prominent in any habitat that has them at AMH sites.

One of the best things about this grouping of spanish sites, is that they cover so much time you can see the evolution of the skull and face from HA through the Homo heidlburgensis /sima homonins and finally on to HSN.




Can you source this somehow please?



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 10:54 AM
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a reply to: Tsuro

see above post,
as to larger visual cortex its no secret you can google it yourself



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 11:27 AM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

No the anatomy , the visual cortex and the looking at a skull image you clearly see they were more adapted to actually nocturnal hunting.. Or less light, vaaaampires.. No but seriously the anatomy claim you did,



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: Tsuro

Im not going to source more than ten years of reading to satisfy your lack of it, look into it yourself.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 11:41 AM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

Oh wow, I'm gonna start using that when I make a statement without a source.. Or maybe I could watch some Hollywood movie?



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 11:54 AM
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a reply to: Tsuro

phys.org...

johnhawks.net...




Neanderthal's short squat body, massive limbs and lack of backward displacement at the shoulder joint may have hampered their ability to incorporate projectile weaponry. According to Jill Rhoades, an evolutionary anthropologist examinations of early modern European fossils show the backward displacement at the shoulder joint, but none of the small sampling of Neanderthal's skeletal remains carry this anatomical characteristic.

Modern athletes like baseball pitchers have this characteristic in one shoulder joint and it is referred to generally as their "throwing arm". When engaging in over head throwing activity, such as throwing a baseball or a spear, this increases the movement of the muscles and gives greater velocity and speed to the throw, according to Steven Churchill an anthropologist at Duke University. This missing technology, along with climate change and competing arrow-shooting humans significantly challenged Neanderthal and may have led to an eventual extinction.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 12:08 PM
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a reply to: peter vlar

so no? im not the expert, if you could verify it or say no..



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 12:22 PM
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a reply to: Tsuro

Neanderthal could likely throw a short distance but HSS could throw much farther and much harder. The throwing arm of the Neanderthal was pretty useless. All of the Early Europeans Humans displayed backwards displacement at the shoulder. None of the Neanderthal did. They weren't going to be throwing spears at a mammoth and the definitely didn't use a bow and arrow like those who came out of Africa did. It is possible that Neanderthal used/created the first atlatl's. The oldest atlatl was found in what is now Germany and is dated to approximately 400 KA, well before AMH existed in Africa.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 12:27 PM
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originally posted by: Tsuro
a reply to: punkinworks10

Oh wow, I'm gonna start using that when I make a statement without a source.. Or maybe I could watch some Hollywood movie?


You ever had the idea that people also read books?



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: intergalactic fire




what,
read a what?



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: intergalactic fire

I also read books, great stories btw..

And i asked someone who actually i consider could teach a thing or two so i asked him for reference...



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 12:44 PM
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a reply to: Tsuro

I'm sure he can link you many books on the subject but if you believe they are all just stories we haven't advanced much.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: intergalactic fire

Then your life must be a surprise everyday !

I wish i could go back to those times



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 01:38 PM
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a reply to: Tsuro
My apologies for being a jackass, I think I have been sparing with Marduk too much.
The deal is there is so much info available on HSN, and I'm just a recreational researcher, so I don't compile a list of what I've read.
But of you are interested in HSN
scholar.google.com...

Unfortunately this paper is now behind a pay wall

www.jstor.org...
It discusses the differences in HSN hip and leg construction and why they were not good runners, but excellent hikers.


And by the way Peter V. is a bonafide expert on HSN
edit on p0000003k47332016Wed, 16 Mar 2016 13:47:32 -0500k by punkinworks10 because: (no reason given)

edit on p0000003k02332016Wed, 16 Mar 2016 14:02:19 -0500k by punkinworks10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 01:56 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

No worries, thats why i always ask him about things in this field..



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 02:22 PM
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a reply to: ParasuvO

Oh look...another ad hominem fallacy that takes a personal tone instead of addressing the science. yawn.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 02:51 PM
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If HSS or at least some variants of HSS have neanderthal and denisovans dna suggesting interbreeding; are these 3 species actually one?

Did they actually diverge that much?

are dogs, wolves and coyotes different species? There are now 3 way hybrids in the US, super coyotes.

Dogs alone have some of the most varied cranial capacity of any mammal, let alone physiology.

Would hypothetical archaeologist in the future place the labrador retriever and yorkshire terrier as the same species.

I was taught if hybrid offspring were fertile.


edit on 16-3-2016 by jellyrev because: (no reason given)



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