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Oldest ever human genome sequence may rewrite human history

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posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 02:59 AM
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From a place called the pit of bones some very interesting discoveries are being made about the divergence of our species. They are now saying Homo antecessor (wow they got that name correct if this all comes to be fact) is the possible common link to us, Neanderthals, and Denisovans.. Bottom line is things are getting pushed back to before 765,000 years ago..

This species first appeared more than a million years ago – and its face is very similar to that of modern humans, says Chris Stringer at the Natural History Museum in London.


www.newscientist.com...


The oldest ever human nuclear DNA to be reconstructed and sequenced reveals Neanderthals in the making – and the need for a possible rewrite of our own origins.

The 430,000-year-old DNA comes from mysterious early human fossils found in Spain’s Sima de los Huesos, or “pit of bones”.

The fossils look like they come from ancestors of the Neanderthals, which evolved some 100,000 years later. But a 2013 study found that their mitochondrial DNA is more similar to that of Denisovans (see video, below), who also lived later and thousands of kilometres away, in southern Siberia.




posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 03:20 AM
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WOW! I love it when they discover something that upsets the academic applecart. There is a hole in Florida that is filled with water that was seen by satellite. It looked initially like a sink hole, but the water didn't make sense. They sent in divers and found no oxygen at the bottom and preserved bones of humans, mastodons, giant sloths, and all sort of stuff. It is just being studied. I had no idea these things were roaming Florida, but the surprising thing is the human bones found with them. I suppose the genome extraction from those may bring up some entirely new information that scrambles their understanding.

The show I saw it on was 'What on Earth?" where they find odd things on satellite images and go in to find out what it is. A lot of new scientific findings of old roads buried in sands in the desserts to rivers, to things like this hole which they say the water makes it unique on the whole Earth. The satellite that found it is being used to detect slight depressions that occur before sinkholes appear in Florida to try and give warning of impending catastrophe. However, sink holes are formed when water is vacated from the limestone deposits below the ground and are dry when formed. This one wasn't which is why it was studied, It had an hourglass shape and the bottom findings show it was there in the Pleistocene era.
edit on 15/3/16 by spirit_horse because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 03:35 AM
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So Carbon dating is only possible to 60kya, but, I think the Neanderthals or Denisovan in a colder climate created the foundation for our modern civilization, the reference is a fixated point called the Pole Star

The 1750CC brain of the neanderthal, and the 1150CC brain of the denisovan would actually put the denisovan at a domestication range..
Chimps have a app. 500CC maximum average about 250CC..

Origin of the domestic dog is likely due to hunting animals in a colder climate..


Genetic information from a 35,000-year-old wolf bone found below a frozen cliff in Siberia is shedding new light on humankind's long relationship with dogs

Domestication much older

A farmers almanac would be extremely hard without a fixated point at the axial tilt.

To make it politically incorrect, if you look at cultures/species where, well, they are less intelligent.. Being culturally intelligent to survive isnt a problem nor an issue.. They are more susceptible to domesticate by very simple needs.. But they are also sometimes extremely parasitic on society..

Embrace Jesus i tell you! Or the Northern Kings will punish you!



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 03:39 AM
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originally posted by: Tsuro
So Carbon dating is only possible to 60kya


May I ask why you've brought this point up?



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 03:44 AM
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a reply to: Ghost147




The 430,000-year-old DNA comes from mysterious early human fossils found in Spain’s Sima de los Huesos, or “pit of bones”.



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 03:59 AM
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originally posted by: Tsuro
a reply to: Ghost147

The 430,000-year-old DNA comes from mysterious early human fossils found in Spain’s Sima de los Huesos, or “pit of bones”.


That's not radiocarbon dating, that's DNA sampling. The oldest DNA samples ever recovered are from insects and plants in ice cores in Greenland up to 800,000 years old.

The two are different tests



edit on 15/3/16 by Ghost147 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 04:20 AM
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a reply to: Ghost147


DNA extraction

Maybe i get the procedure wrong, and you can guide me?



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 04:49 AM
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This explains things in more detail.

www.scientificamerican.com...

Matthias Meyer has just published the results of what may be the world’s most wasteful genome-sequencing project. In decoding just 0.1% of the genome of the oldest DNA ever recovered from an ancient human, the molecular biologist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, threw out enough raw data to map the modern human genome dozens of times over.
But the excess was necessary, because the DNA in the 430,000-year-old bones was degraded and contaminated. Meyer’s feat of recovery has revealed that the remains, from a cavern in northern Spain, represent early Neanderthals—and has pushed back estimates of the time at which the ancient predecessors of humans must have split from those of Neanderthals (M. Meyeret al. Nature dx.doi.org...; 2016).


and this...



Researchers should now be looking for a population that lived around 700,000 to 900,000 years ago, says Martinón-Torres. She thinks that Homo antecessor, known from 900,000-year-old remains from Spain, is the strongest candidate for the common ancestor, if such specimens can be found in Africa or the Middle East.



From the reading I have done there are MULTIPLE finds of early quasi hominids very loosely labeled in the homo genius
however most of those papers are in French or German neither language I speak. Google Translate was very painful!
The Homo tree branches all over the place, the problem being the laypersons understanding is very rigid due to these other finds being pretty obscure, so conversations usually come to a screaming halt.



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 04:57 AM
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a reply to: Caver78

All i read was, it was a failure, but we cannot say we just spent resources on a failure, so lets make something up of the 0,1 percent contaminated and degraded material.................

Or they said we just made a revolutionary discovery, but im gonna point to my first opinion..



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 05:32 AM
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a reply to: Tsuro

Science works in fits and starts, they have excess data so maybe this will help the next guy or gal with the next set of bones to be discovered?

Yes, I know I am obnoxiously optimistic.



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 10:45 AM
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a reply to: Caver78

Think you are absolutely right. Fossils are extremely difficult to find but their lack doesn't mean that humans/ancestors etc didn't live in a lot more places than we currently think they did or the actual time we think they lived.

It wouldn't surprise me if we don't find our current ideas are vastly out of time and only reveal a very small part of our ancient history. DNA testing is a fabulous tool for getting to the truth of our past but it only gives the picture where fossils have survived.



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 11:14 AM
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Off topic, But I laughed so hard at your avatar with the kitty sky-diving.




posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: Tsuro

Do you have a citation that indicates where you derived the 1150 cc cranial capacity for Denisovans? I'm calling Bull on this as the entire physical remains of Denisovans can fit in the palm of my hand at a couple of phalanges and a couple of teeth. There is no way to determine cranial capacity without a cranium. Likewise for the chimpanzee cranial capacity as they range from 320cc to 480 cc giving them an average of 400 cc.

Also, if you had read through your cited source material, you would have found that dogs were not likely to have been domesticated in northern latitudes. Instead, they were domesticated at lower latitudes and then bred with indigenous Taimyr Wolves as Human populations moved North. That is what was indicated when analysis was done on the 35KA wolf bone found in Siberia.


edit on 15-3-2016 by peter vlar because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 01:10 PM
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Told you so...



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 01:31 PM
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a reply to: SLAYER69

LOL, yes you did.


Now get back to work....




posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 02:23 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 03:52 PM
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a reply to: benahaya

Grab your tinfoil hats and pass the cool aide!



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 04:34 PM
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DNA sample dating is based on attributing genetic difference to time.

So a mouse skull from last week having a genome 23% different than this lab rat we mapped, must be one trillion and twelve years old. Math!

Also, isotopic carbon is made -in part- by sun-sent protons with the right frequency. Other protons exist, some things are radioactive, and their age isn't a direct consequence of it.

If you guys really want state sponsored star trek tech, you're going to have to get more serious about science.

Craniology is bunk, and digging up human remains isn't good manners.

Children have small skulls, tall big people have big skulls, people's skulls' shapes vary slightly today too.



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 04:56 PM
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originally posted by: wisvol
So a mouse skull from last week having a genome 23% different than this lab rat we mapped, must be one trillion and twelve years old. Math!


what?....

Citation please


originally posted by: wisvol
If you guys really want state sponsored star trek tech, you're going to have to get more serious about science.


Yeah, lets get as 'serious about science' as you. With all your citations and all to back up your claims...



posted on Mar, 15 2016 @ 07:22 PM
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originally posted by: Tsuro
a reply to: Ghost147


DNA extraction

Maybe i get the procedure wrong, and you can guide me?


Absolutely. You can view the scientific letter that is being referenced in the article in the OP Here, it goes through the methodology used to gather the data to come to these dates (listed at the bottom of page 3 under 'Methods Summary')

The letter states: DNA was isolated using a recently published silica-based method14 and converted into 77 libraries for sequencing

You can view the methodology even more closely at the following references:
~ Meyer, M. et al. A high-coverage genome sequence from an archaic Denisovan individual. Science 338, 222–226 (2012).
~ Gansauge, M. T. & Meyer, M.Single-stranded DNA library preparation for the sequencing of ancient or damaged DNA.Nature Protocols 8, 737–748 (2013)


All of which are dated after the article you've posted



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