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Why Do I Need a Photo ID to See a Doctor?

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posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 09:45 AM
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I went to see a new doctor today and was asked for a Photo ID. I told them my name and explained I would be paying cash for the visit. They told me that they couldn't treat me without proof of my identity. I then asked if they were denying me service and they told me that without a Photo ID they couldn't see me even if I was going to be paying cash. I walked out.

I had my ID on me, but WTH do I need to have it for if I am paying cash? Our country is on the brink of madness when you can't trouble a potential voter for their ID, but it is perfectly okay to require one to obtain medical treatment. So basically I can vote, but I better not get hurt while doing it or I am screwed if I don't have a friggen ID.

Screw this country and it's "society". This kind of stuff makes me livid.




posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 09:49 AM
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a reply to: Metallicus


Prescription shopping for one thing.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: Metallicus

I can only think that your state may, perhaps, have a prescription monitoring database.
It is probably in case you were to receive a narcotic.
I do agree that if that is the case, then at the time the prescription is written would be the time to show required ID.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 09:53 AM
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a reply to: Metallicus

The kind of doctor who is part of this isn't the kind of person you want to entrust with your health.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 09:54 AM
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a reply to: Metallicus

They also need to keep accurate and verified records, for many reasons. One being potential lawsuits (against them.) I'll gladly sell you a rebuilt engine for cash and you don't even have to tell me your name - heck, wear a mask if you want, but if I was a doctor, I wouldn't treat or diagnose you without having a verified, accurate record of who you are - it could come back to bite me in the glutes.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 09:56 AM
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Wait, so you didn't see the doctor, did they know you even needed a script?

BS that you needed your ID to just "see" a doctor. Not fair at all.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 09:56 AM
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a reply to: Metallicus

So the medical records of your visit are listed under the right person. Maybe I just am not at the level of paranoid that I should be, but I really don't care who knows my identity. I figure the doctor I went to see is cool, since I went there,and not vice versa, I don't mind showing my ID to vote, as it is a way to eliminate fraud, and I sure don't mind showing my ID to a cop when asked, as I prefer the adequate ventilation I already have as opposed to excessive ventilation.

If you are afraid to show the doctor your id, maybe you need to look a bit in the mirror and ask yourself why that is.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 10:02 AM
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a reply to: Metallicus

You need one to vote, why not to see your doctor? Security is better than freedom amirite?



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 10:08 AM
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a reply to: Metallicus


What if someone used your name and got medication?
Or had serious mental problems and had the appointment and that went on your own health record/medical file.
If it's your Dr, why not just show it, who cares?


edit on 11/3/16 by blupblup because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 10:13 AM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: Metallicus


Prescription shopping for one thing.


This was an ophthalmologist. The only prescription involved might have been for eyeglasses.

Also, I don't want to have to have an ID at all. I would give up my right to vote and many other things for my right to live in anonymity. I should be able to transact business with cash in a free country.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 10:14 AM
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a reply to: blupblup

I didn't even think of that aspect. If someone used your identity to get a diagnosis and medication for some form of mental illness, you could loose some of your basic rights and by no fault of your own. Think of the government stopping by to relieve you of your weapons due to your recent mental illness filed by your doctor. I'd bet the rant on that would be quite loud.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 10:16 AM
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a reply to: network dude


Exactly mate, identity fraud can happen in many ways and have all manner of consequences.
I'd just show the ID personally.

*shrugs*



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 10:20 AM
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originally posted by: blupblup
a reply to: network dude


Exactly mate, identity fraud can happen in many ways and have all manner of consequences.
I'd just show the ID personally.

*shrugs*


You make a good point. However, I still don't like how invasive doing business has become. I don't like that my humanity has been reduced to a Photo ID card.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 10:21 AM
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a reply to: Metallicus


Hmm, well, I'm not sure in that case. In Canada, I have never given a photo ID to have an eye exam.

That being said, in the US, medical service providers are quite a bit stickier on keeping records due to lawsuits, insurance, etc. The eye doctor needs a record of who they treat I suppose.

I typically agree with your libertarian views, but I can also see why a service provider in any medical field would feel the need to keep track of their patients.

You live in a "free" country, but unfortunately it was only "free" for a very small period of time, as you know.

ETA: maybe you should add the part about this being an eye doctor in your OP so you don't get a bunch of useless responses like my original about prescription shopping.

edit on 11-3-2016 by Atsbhct because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 10:25 AM
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originally posted by: Metallicus

You make a good point. However, I still don't like how invasive doing business has become. I don't like that my humanity has been reduced to a Photo ID card.


I hear you mate but that's the way it is? The UK gov wanted to bring in some ID chipped card with all your medical data and all manner of stuff on it.. and then charge us money to "buy" them. It was scrapped thankfully but I'm sure it will be the way of the world in the near future. Your entire life, history, financial and medical records... all on a little card that is a digital you.

But until then... just show your passport and get your glasses dude.


edit on 11/3/16 by blupblup because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 10:29 AM
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You always have to. How can the provider be sure you say who you are without your info?
edit on 11-3-2016 by avgguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 10:43 AM
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I have been in jobs before where I had to see a great many patients. Some, not that often. I asked for a quick photo to go in their record so when I pulled it, it jogged my memory on who they were.

I know that sounds terrible, but good grief, physicians have several thousand patients and it takes time to get to know them all.

What I asked for was strictly voluntary, and nobody saw the record but me, and sometimes clerical staff and a treatment team member. If somebody said they would rather not, there were no questions asked, I just moved on. When I left that job, I removed those photos from the records as they were there for my purpose only.

This might not be the reasoning here; but if it is, I don't blame them . Of course, I don't prescribe medications, so these justifications might be altogether different. Seems to me if they are concerned about fraud in medications, the photo's would be better served with the pharmacists.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 10:58 AM
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a reply to: chiefsmom

Not fair? What isn't fair is the number of losers out there scamming doctors and pharmacies to get drugs and medical benefits, forcing the medical industry to do it's best to document who it interacts with and when, and what they do, so nothing comes back to bite them in the ass later.

In a country where people sue each other for looking at them wrong, it only makes sense that doctors, who are already targets for bs malpractice suits from scumbags hoping for a settlement, are taking steps to make sure they're covered.

In my opinion, the person coming in refusing to give ID is the one who is up to no good...You expect someone else to put their ass on the line and treat you medically (even a consult could bite them later) and you whine when they don't risk their entire livelihood for you? How selfish of you.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 10:59 AM
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First world problems right here.

I'll never set foot in a doctors office ever again.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 11:01 AM
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a reply to: Metallicus

Yes, you should. Now tell that to the tens of thousands of morons that ruined it for people like you. People create fake identities to screw over landlords, utility companies, services, businesses, etc, just to get out of paying what they owe. Your desire to be anonymous may be pure, but for other people it isn't, and if I was a businessman how could I know the difference between you and some loser who wants to rip me off or set me up for a lawsuit? I'd rather know who I am dealing with.

Also, ophthalmologists are still at risk for malpractice suits.




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