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NEWS: New Case Of Mad Cow Confirmed, This Time In Younger Animal

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posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 02:12 PM
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For the second time since Christmas, Canadian authorities have announced a case of Mad Cow disease. This makes the 3rd case in 1 years time. All 3 of the cows are from Alberta, Canada. This latest animal is just seven years old, and was born after a feed ban was instituted specifically to stop the spread of the disease. Agriculture Minister Andy Mitchell claimed in a news conference that "...this is not unexpected." He went further to say that preliminary investigation indicates that contaminated feed was the most likely source of this latest case of Mad Cow.
 



www.canada.com
OTTAWA (CP) - There's another confirmed case of mad cow disease in Canada but this time it involves an animal infected after a feed ban meant to prevent further cases.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says it confirmed Tuesday a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in an Alberta beef cow just under seven years of age. It's the third Canadian case in just over a year and the second since Christmas. All involve Alberta cows.



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


This one is a little scary if you ask me. A food ban was implemented to stop the spread of the disease, yet another cow has come down with the disease. If the culprit is contaminated food, then how can anyone be sure what is and what isn't contaminated?

If a measure so severe was taken that they banned a foodsource, how can it be possible that this contamination happened. Is there a way to actualy stop this disease?


[edit on 11-1-2005 by Banshee]




posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 03:41 PM
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"Is there a way to actualy stop this disease?"

Sure... if they wanted to.

But first that would mean that they would have to test for it, and if they test for it they might actually find it, and if they find it it would be detrimental to the cattle industry and everything else tied to cattle all the way down to the little drug capsules that contain gelatin from cow ligaments.

If you really want to be scared (and informed), check out this site... organicconsumers.org...

-Scott



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 03:51 PM
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I was under the impression that it could not be tested for. The "Prions" I believe they are called, cannot be tested for. Please advise, I would love to know more!



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 04:08 PM
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Originally posted by superdude
I was under the impression that it could not be tested for. The "Prions" I believe they are called, cannot be tested for. Please advise, I would love to know more!


It's not exactly 'high tech', they suck out some cow brains (after the cow is dead) and stick them into the head of a mouse. Months later they look at the mouse's brains, if they are full of holes we all panic (and hope they can find the cow that they conducted the test on)!

Deeper explanation, along with newer methods...
www.biomedcentral.com...

-Scott

[edit on 11-1-2005 by Nemithesis]



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 04:14 PM
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It's not exactly 'high tech', they suck out some cow brains (after the cow is dead) and stick them into the head of a mouse.


Mmmmm mmmm, sounds yummy! So in other words the only way to test is to kill the cattle? To me, that means that it can't be tested.



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 04:17 PM
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Originally posted by superdude

This one is a little scary if you ask me. A food ban was implemented to stop the spread of the disease, yet another cow has come down with the disease. If the culprit is contaminated food, then how can anyone be sure what is and what isn't contaminated?

If a measure so severe was taken that they banned a foodsource, how can it be possible that this contamination happened. Is there a way to actualy stop this disease?


[edit on 11-1-2005 by Banshee]


You should know that symptoms can take years to manifest. It's entirely possible that the cow was infected prior to the feed ban, and didn't show up until now.

This is why the whole thing is so scary. Since every cow is not tested, they could already have contracted the disorder and not show any signs prior to being slaughtered.

NO ONE will establish (not being studied) whether or not the disease can be passed on prior to manifesting (meaning during a time the animal has it, but has not yet shown any symptoms), and it takes several years for the disease to manifest once infected.



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 04:40 PM
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Yes it is scary. It's time to do the right thing, like Great Britain had to do. Start killing cattle that have been anywhere in the vicinity of these infected cattle. If we don't the consequences will be worse later. But we are a people that needs to wait until later. We actually need to lose a coulple thousand people before we start our investigations. Before you know it, a couple years from now, Bush will be napalming Canadian Cattle ranches.



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 05:04 PM
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That effectively ruined my appetite (Was going to have beef for dinner)

It's not Albertan beef, but I highly doubt it's isolated to the West.

Relentless, it couldn't have been infected prior to the ban. It hadn't been born.
Though, I wonder if BSE can be transmitted from Mamma cow to calf?



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 05:08 PM
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Also, I'm wondering about this.

I'm aware the UK has over 150,000 cattle test positive for BSE and there have been several cases of vCJD in the UK attributed to BSE. They keep saying you can eat the beef muscle products, like steak ground beef, etc., but what will infect you are the brains, eyes and spinal tissues of the infected cows. Were the British eating these parts of the cows either directly or were they combined in ground beef?




posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 05:19 PM
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Found my own answer


In 1989, Britain banned the human consumption of "specified offals" (brain, spleen, thymus, tonsils, and gut), but many Britons had consumed such products in their luncheon meats, frankfurters, and meat pies prior to that time.



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 05:23 PM
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Originally posted by parrhesia
Relentless, it couldn't have been infected prior to the ban. It hadn't been born.
Though, I wonder if BSE can be transmitted from Mamma cow to calf?





Then this is even worse, I was thinking the US Feed ban, which only went into affect a year or two ago. However, note this from the article:



"This is not unexpected," he told a news conference. "Although this animal was born after the feed ban was put in place (in 1997) preliminary information indicates the likely source is contaminated feed and this will be the focus of our investigations."

"I am directing the CFIA to conduct an examination of what this animal may have been fed early in its life and the potential feed source."

A ruminant to ruminant feed ban was introduced in 1997 to stop the spread of the disease through infected tissue. But officials said some infected feed may have been consumed shortly after the ban.


So, first of all, this particular cow was in a tight window that is being somewhat acknowledged. Secondly, another thing that they refuse to establish is whether a pregnant cow with the disease can pass it on either while carrying the calf or through it's milk.

Now, considering the fact that the US feed ban was put into place much later than this one, how many people feel the year or two since the precaustions were finally taken is enough time to feel safe?

Another thing that shuld worry people is that the feeb ban (at least in the US) is for ruminants. But this feed is still considered suitable for non-ruminants (chicken, pigs, your pets). I do believe, and someone please correct me if I am wrong, that these animals then can be used for ruminant feed. It is my understanding that the feed ban in the US is strickly addressing feeding ruminants to ruminants.

The only way to stop this madness (pun intended) is for the public to demand the industry go back to natural feeding, if not entirely organic and this precludes the use of growth hormones (since cattle subjected to growth hormones cannot be sustained on a natural diet). But there is too much money at stake for the drug companies for that to happen via government regulation.



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 05:33 PM
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Originally posted by Relentless

So, first of all, this particular cow was in a tight window that is being somewhat acknowledged. Secondly, another thing that they refuse to establish is whether a pregnant cow with the disease can pass it on either while carrying the calf or through it's milk.


And if it's seen to be able to pass from the pregnant cow to the calf through milk... there's another worry. I'm glad I don't drink milk.



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 05:35 PM
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You should know that symptoms can take years to manifest. It's entirely possible that the cow was infected prior to the feed ban, and didn't show up until now.

This however is what is so scary, this latest cow was born AFTER the ban.



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 05:37 PM
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Regarding passing BSE from pregnant cows to calfs.. from this Canadian inspection site, I would think there's a good chance...



All BSE cases as well as, if they are females, all their progeny born within the last two years together with all cattle reared with them during their first year of life that consumed the same potentially contaminated feed or all animals born in the same herd within 12 months of their birth, if alive are completely destroyed following their slaughter or death

More



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 05:38 PM
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I just found this article that may shed some more light on the subject of how the cow got infected, if in fact what is stated is true. The article was only written a month ago.

www.prwatch.org...

It's not pretty, so if you don't have an option of buying organic meats and you aren't willing to give it up, don't explore the rest of the site too far. I mean it



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 06:38 PM
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This cow was born in March 1998 and the feed ban went into effect August 1997. I heard one speculation that the farmer was just using up feed that he had. A costly mistake in m.ore than one way.

They say that if you stay away from meat with bone-in you should be okay.

I believe the feed ban includes chicken ruminants as well because of fear of avian (bird) flu.

Wow, kinda makes you want to become a vegetarian, eh. Not! Nothing goes better with a big ole salad than a gorgeous BBQ steak.



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 06:47 PM
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An excerpt from it:


The weaning of calves on cattle blood remains legal and widespread. Cattle blood and fat are fed legally to cattle. Cattle are legally fed to pigs and chickens which are in turn legally fed back to cattle.


And they are still trying to convince us that Mad Cow is under control? Correct me if I am wrong but haven't British researchers confirmed mad cow is transmissible through blood and organ transplant.

Also from the site:


The USDA will sue any company privately testing for mad cow disease. The USDA's own testing program is inadequate and has no transparency. The recent announcement that a suspect cow was eventually found negative has not been confirmed or verified outside of the USDA and therefore should not be trusted.


No oversight - no independent verification - no confidence at least on my part. How many people already have this disease and don't even know it.


B.



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 06:54 PM
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Originally posted by Bleys
No oversight - no independent verification - no confidence at least on my part. How many people already have this disease and don't even know it.


B.


EXACTLY! (I really feel that one word makes my point but since that is not allowed......)

The other question becomes how many have it and are diagnosed as something else for damage control? There are an awful lot of degenerative diseases out there to pawn it off on.

Just food for thought
.



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 07:16 PM
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Originally posted by parrhesia
And if it's seen to be able to pass from the pregnant cow to the calf through milk... there's another worry. I'm glad I don't drink milk.

I found a lovely article on milk at Rense.com~old but worth the read:

www.rense.com...



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 07:35 PM
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Originally posted by CelticMist
I found a lovely article on milk at Rense.com~old but worth the read:

www.rense.com...

One thing I do not agree with regarding this article is that all dairy is the same. If it is organic, a great deal of these problems do not occur.










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