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Best power tool manufacturer. cross thread intervention.

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posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 05:19 PM
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In another thread the question came up as to the best power tool company and I felt the need to make a new thread about this to keep it on topic.

Options in the thread where Dewalt, Hilti, Makita and Bosch.

All good in there own right but I would like to proffer my own opinions and ask others for the same.

Here we go and starting with Bosch.

Best jigsaws ever, they invented the Jigsaw and just got better, good technology and fantastic blades. I own a bosch pro jigsaw and its old but as good as it gets. 2002 and lived a builders life. may benefit from some new brushes in the near future.(ignore the green stuff bty that is for diy/argos)

I do not own but use a bosch belt sander, this thing takes 4 inch belts and will take your arm off if not carefull, a day on this thing and it feels like you have been hit by a large car/medium sized van. this with the right attachments would pull a caravan out of a medium sized ditch.

Dewalt. Make the only radial arm saw of choice. cordless drills and impact drivers also good. Now own what was ELU so make a good half inch router but quality less.

Hilti. Good for builders who need no nonsense tools that can hold thier own day after day.

Makita. good for girls and those with a lack of funds, popular with lesser trades that do not need real tools. make pretty good sanders. Overpriced and somewhere inbetween Argos and real mans tools.

Thats my opinion and would love to talk more as tools is good.




posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 05:25 PM
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Old Bosch is good. New Bosch seem like cheaper stuff in Bosch boxes.

Why I like Hilti?

They repair for free and replace if the repair is too arduous. They collect from me and return to me within 5 days, even if the problem is an accidentally cut power lead. They're red too!

Dewalt? Ok until you have to buy one of those expensive batteries!

Just got a nice Makita LS1216 chop saw for work. Looks the biz.


Off to bed, now. Laters.



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 05:28 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific

Makita 18v lxt is a great hammer drill and impact drive drill. Certainly NOT a "girls" tool. Their lithium ion batteries slowly discharge rather than abrupt making them much more valuable on a ladder than the Dewalt Chinese made 20 volt.

I'm a carpenter amongst other things like a farmer and herbalist. Makitas are fantastic tools today. I'll bet you I can frame 1000 SQ feet faster with a Makita 18v, than a Dewalt, and that it can take a fall to a slab and still operate more times than any tool I've ever used.

Now I really use a Hitachi 21 degree framing gun, but have framed smaller projects with screws. I'll take a Hitachi framing gun over a senco and definitely over a shi##y Bostitch.
edit on 10-3-2016 by BlueJacket because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 05:30 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific

You are absolutely correct regarding the Bosch jigsaw, nothing better



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 05:30 PM
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As far as new power tools and cordless tools go I highly recommend Milwaukee.



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 05:39 PM
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originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: nonspecific

Makita 18v lxt is a great hammer drill and impact drive drill. Certainly NOT a "girls" tool. Their lithium ion batteries slowly discharge rather than abrupt making them much more valuable on a ladder than the Dewalt Chinese made 20 volt.

I'm a carpenter amongst other things like a farmer and herbalist. Makitas are fantastic tools today. I'll bet you I can frame 1000 SQ feet faster with a Makita 18v, than a Dewalt, and that it can take a fall to a slab and still operate more times than any tool I've ever used.

Now I really use a Hitachi 21 degree framing gun, but have framed smaller projects with screws. I'll take a Hitachi framing gun over a senco and definitely over a shi##y Bostitch.

Now we are talking tools!

It is not the name but the tool in question and the manufacturer that makes the best one for the job.

Here in the UK when it comes to first and second fix nail guns you cannot really beat Paslode. not sure if you have them where you are?



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 05:39 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific

I swear by my DeWalt DC 727 18v drill. Nothing beats mains power, but in my line of work, you need power on the move, and this thing delivers every time I apply it to a surface. Coupled with hardplate bits, this thing will eat anything I will ever need to put a drill bit through, and you cannot ask for more than that.

There are, however, some jobs that it is a little TOO beefy for.

Removing/replacing screws is a job that I could do with my DeWalt, because I have a handy dandy adaptor bit, which came with some very nice screwdriver bit heads in various shapes and sizes. However, there is much power in that yellow and black casing, and sometimes there is simply too much. So I carry with me a Worx Qbit on every job. This great little bit of gear has just the right amount of torque to remove, or replace a screw without rounding the head off, or shearing it, as I have done before now with my DeWalt. It runs on a 14v system, charged via a port on the bottom of the hand grip.

The smart thing about that bit of kit, is the way it holds different bit heads. It can carry six different bits at a time, and these are stored and deployed inside a revolving chamber, a little like you might expect to see on a six gun from the old west. In order to swap bits, one simply draws back a slide which is on the top of the tool which retracts the previous bit, to reveal the chamber near the forend of the tool, and then turns the chamber until the desired bit is facing the forend. Then you simply push the slide forward, which covers the chamber, and presses the newly selected bit, out of the front of the tool, ready for use. It came with a dinky little pilot bit, a No.2 pozi bit, a narrow slotted bit, a hex head, and some others. I cannot fault it, for all that it is hardly a bit of pro gear. It has saved me an awful lot of RSI over the years, that is for damned sure. Something else I should mention about it, is that it does not give one problems, when one wants to use another manufacturers bit set inside it. As long as the bits have the same size base, you are golden.

Lovely!



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 05:40 PM
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originally posted by: charolais
As far as new power tools and cordless tools go I highly recommend Milwaukee.


They are getting more popular in the UK but seem pricey for what they are?

A little like Festool, more of a rich boys toy than a viable option for the general man at work?



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific

BOSCH is the best!

I have tools from them that are over 25 years old still working like a champ. And it´s not that they have been used rarely. One hammerdrill is over 30 years old and I fixed the coal holders with parts of a coke can. They are absolutely durable.

Recently I bought a high pressure water cleaner and was not that happy about the power. I gave it three stars on amazon and two days later they contacted me and send someone personally to pick up the device and check it.

Absolutely professional customer service.
There is a saying in germany, no kidding:
"Halt deine Gosch, du schaffst bei Bosch!!"
Translates into: You really can´t be complaining, because you work at BOSCH.

BOSCH
Jigsaw, big and medium impact drill, circular saw, vibrating multitool, three axis saw, grinder, sander
the jigsaw and three axis saw is the best!!

MAKITA
Their portable Drillmachines are very good! You can either srew at least 1500 screws with the grey (not red or black) akku packs.

HILTI
Good heavy equipment.

FESTOOL
For high precision work on wood and metal. Really, I have a circular saw that´s at least 20 years old with electronic blimblim and ask me what else it´s unbreakable and precise to a 10th millimeter when it comes to long cuts.

DEWALT
I dislike them because the haptic(feeling in your hand) is bad in my opinion.

DREMEL
Only have their original dremel. Died after two years. Piece of #

versus

NONAME DREMEL 10€(including shipping!) 200pcs set
Lasts for over ten years....loud as hell but unbreakable

edit on 10-3-2016 by verschickter because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 05:45 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Would something like this be of use to you sir?

I have one and no use for it. just needs a battery and a very good tool?

linky



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 05:46 PM
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originally posted by: verschickter
a reply to: nonspecific

BOSCH ist the best!

I have tools from them that are over 25 years old still working like a champ. And it´s not that they have been used rarely. One hammerdrill is over 30 years old and I fixed the coal holders with parts of a coke can. They are absolutely durable.

Recently I bought a high pressure water cleaner and was not that happy about the power. I gave it three stars on amazon and two days later they contacted me and send someone personally to pick up the device and check it.

Absolutely professional customer service.
There is a saying in germany, no kidding:
"Halt deine Gosch, du schaffst bei Bosch!!"
Translates into: You really can´t be complaining, because you work at BOSCH.

MAKITA
Their portable Drillmachines are very good.

HILTI
Good heavy equipment.

FESTOOL
For high precision work on wood and metal. Really, I have a circular saw that´s at least 20 years old with electronic blimblim and ask me what else it´s unbreakable.

DEWALT
I dislike them because the haptic is bad in my opinion.


What did you mean by hipatic? I feel that spell checker/ translate is going wrong?
edit on 10/3/2016 by nonspecific because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 05:52 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific
You mean that "t" that slipped in? I do not use any translate or spell checkers other than google translate. What else is wrong?
if you mean haptic, I mean the feeling of the tool.



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 05:56 PM
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originally posted by: verschickter
a reply to: nonspecific
You mean that "t" that slipped in? I do not use any translate or spell checkers other than google translate. What else is wrong?
if you mean haptic, I mean the feeling of the tool.




Understood but hapatic means nothing in the English language, how would you describe it please?

Is it how it holds in the hands or is it how the tool moves? It is not a word here?



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 06:07 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific

To be honest I just assumed it exists and if I exchange the "k" with a "c" it´s ok

"haptik" describes the feeling of a tool, the grip, the weight, the balance, does it feel sturdy or instable, how much recoil the motor has when it stops, how easy is it to change battery pack and all those things all boiled down into one word.

If you take a cheap plastic screw driver and compare it to a good one with soft ergonomic grip, you have the best example of it.
The "haptik" of the cheap one is bad but the other one with soft ergonomic rubber grips has a outstanding "haptik".

Or call it "the way it integrates to tool into you body to become one with the tool".
Because being one with the tool is important.

I guess it´s a german only word or type of thinking.
edit on 10-3-2016 by verschickter because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 06:21 PM
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originally posted by: verschickter
a reply to: nonspecific

To be honest I just assumed it exists and if I exchange the "k" with a "c" it´s ok

"haptik" describes the feeling of a tool, the grip, the weight, the balance, does it feel sturdy or instable, how much recoil the motor has when it stops, how easy is it to change battery pack and all those things all boiled down into one word.

If you take a cheap plastic screw driver and compare it to a good one with soft ergonomic grip, you have the best example of it.
The "haptik" of the cheap one is bad but the other one with soft ergonomic rubber grips has a outstanding "haptik".

Or call it "the way it integrates to tool into you body to become one with the tool".
Because being one with the tool is important.

I guess it´s a german only word or type of thinking.


I thought that is what you meant, no word for it in English but "feels right" is the closest we can get.



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 06:42 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific

Well... It looks like a handy bit of kit, but I am of the belief that it is impossible to know without experimentation!

*In no way should anyone assume that I adopt this position in order to justify performing experiments.*



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 06:49 PM
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Ridgid power tools. I like em a lot. great lifetime warranty. Much less expensive than Dewalt.

Also pretty impressed with the Hitachi 18v. impact drivers we use at work. Used rough outdoors in all weather. They take a beating. I run screws into some pretty thick steel at times. Of course a good screw is the key there,



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 06:59 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific

Haptic feedback is what is being referred to here. Touch feedback would be another way to describe it, but modern mobile phones have settings to provide enhanced haptic feedback. When you press a button on screen, the part of the phone responsible for vibration sends a pulse of vibration out, to help you register the fact that your attempt to hit the button was successful.

All the word means where tools are concerned, is how much information you receive through your hands, while using it to perform a task. It is a relatively new term though. Other uses for it come into play when mad engineers in computer labs, think about new ways to provide sensory input to users. Think about it, computer games which can simulate blast waves, or rain, or winds and make you feel them, or a measure of them at least.

It's an interesting area of study, in any case!



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 07:00 PM
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Table saw - Bosch

Cordless drills/impact drivers - #1. Makita #2. Bosch

Corded hammer drill - Bosch

Sliding Radial arm saw/Chop saw - DeWalt DW717 is good for the money tho there are better more expensive ones.

Jig saw - #1. Bosch #2. Milwaukee

Nail guns - roofing/framing: Hitachi. anything smaller, Paslode

Sawzall - Milwaukee

Skill saw - Makita

Makita is by no means "girl tools" I agree with the poster above, my Makita drill an driver have taken many falls on concrete, in pools, in dirt and they just keep going. DeWalt is junk in comparison.



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 07:02 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific

G'day

Been a while, but I couldn't resist.



Makita. good for girls




Au Contraire Mon Ami, although I agree about the jigsaw and the beltsander. what you see is the tip of the iceberg and they take a flogging, especially the grinders and they never miss a beat. Try strapping on an Arbortech industrial carver and see how you go with that, I'd back Makita anyday.

And yeah, WTH is it with Festool. I've never used one and not likely to either, do they just think up numbers and then double them for their pricing?

Kind Regards
Myselfaswell




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