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Lizards trapped in amber for 100 million years amaze scientists

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posted on Mar, 9 2016 @ 01:01 PM
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Okay, and "by the way", amber is the best record of how far back life goes, essentially unchanged.

Torpeodes some aspects of evolution.




intptr: If that's the case, I'm quite sure you should be able to cite a specific aspect that was torpedoed and to make a cogent argument regarding how and why?

I'm quite sure once we get down to brass tacks, no such "torpedoing" will have taken place. I say this not because my mind is closed, but because I've studied this enough to believe I would have heard such "valid" scientific criticisms before.

But I'm willing to hear your argument if you actually have one.
edit on 9-3-2016 by Greggers because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-3-2016 by Greggers because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 9 2016 @ 02:06 PM
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No change in a hundred million years? Facepalm yourself with a handful of fresh amber.


There is nothing about evolution that requires any particular organism to change at any particular rate.

Elephant Shark DNA hasn't changed in like 420 million years. Those are tough little guys! The oldest, unchanged vertebrates known.

That doesn't necessarily mean that elephant sharks have not been responsible for starting evolutionary nodes that branched off in different directions (I'd need to do more research to determine that), but the Elephant Shark itself remains alive at the base of the node.


edit on 9-3-2016 by Greggers because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2016 @ 07:53 PM
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originally posted by: Ghost147

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Ghost147


Do you or do you not believe that the asteroid that occurred in the Yucatan event killed all life on Earth?

I don't know. I wasn't there.


Right, because if a person wasn't there to see it, we can never know anything at all. Just like I've never seen $2 billion dollars in cash, therefore it doesn't exist.

You're right. Fiat currency is just paper, no intrinsic value.



posted on Mar, 9 2016 @ 07:57 PM
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a reply to: Greggers


But I'm willing to hear your argument if you actually have one.

I think we both offered our arguments, we were going to just leave it a page ago, I think thats the best for now.

Out of respect…



posted on Mar, 9 2016 @ 10:17 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Greggers


But I'm willing to hear your argument if you actually have one.

I think we both offered our arguments, we were going to just leave it a page ago, I think thats the best for now.

Out of respect…


I never saw your argument. You have yet to provide any evidence for your opinion to be a valid argument.



posted on Mar, 9 2016 @ 10:54 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147
It was discovered in the past few years, that certain bacteria live several meters/kilometers below the ocean's surface.
Mystery Microbes Discovered Beneath Seafloor



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 02:23 AM
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originally posted by: Greggers
Again, the only ELE relevant to the honey bee is the Yucatan event. Evidence shows that bees suffered major losses during this period of time. But some clearly survived. It only takes one surviving hive to keep the gene pool alive.

Perhaps I am wrong but this seems like circular reasoning.

We know they survived because they are here. They are here because they survived.



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 02:34 AM
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a reply to: Ghost147

Thanks for the links I will most def check it out...looks very cool already!!!



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 09:15 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

We know they survived because their species can be observed in the fossil record, throughout the various strata between then and now.

Small lizards did pretty well during this particular ELE. They actually ended up expanding in divsersity.
edit on 10-3-2016 by Greggers because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2016 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: Greggers
Again, the only ELE relevant to the honey bee is the Yucatan event. Evidence shows that bees suffered major losses during this period of time. But some clearly survived. It only takes one surviving hive to keep the gene pool alive.

Perhaps I am wrong but this seems like circular reasoning.

We know they survived because they are here. They are here because they survived.


This isn't mere speculation. We have substantial fossil data that shows how this occurred.

Here's an excerpt from very well written scientific article on the subject:

Paleofaunal data confirm that there were fewer mammalian species during the latest Cretaceous than during any interval of the Cenozoic, and that a massive diversification took place during the early Paleocene, immediately after a mass extinction. Measurement data show that Cretaceous mammals were on average small and occupied a narrow range of body sizes; after the Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction, there was a rapid and permanent shift in the mean. The fact that there was an early Cenozoic mammalian radiation is entirely compatible with the existence of a few Cretaceous splits among modern mammal lineages.

You can read the full article here: The Fossil Record of North American Mammals: Evidence for a Paleocene Evolutionary Radiation



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