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Russian "Mayak" Satellite; Brightest Star In The Sky

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posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 05:21 PM
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a reply to: DexterRiley



Limits
According to Texas A&M University Extension, plants require a period of dark in order to grow properly. In most cases, the plants need at least eight hours of dark out of every day. Some flowering plants have even more specific requirements, as such plants as poinsettia and Christmas cactus will not bloom if they are exposed to light for more than 11 hours per day. The leaves on plants that get too much light begin to get pale. They may end up appearing burnt, and the leaves will ultimately turn brown and die. If the overexposure continues, the entire plant will succumb.


Exceptions
Texas A&M University does point out that some tropical plants can do well with constant light. These plants are those from at or near the equator that are used to extremely intense light 12 hours each day. When placed in an environment where there is constant lighting, such as in an office, the perpetual lights lack the intensity of the sunlight at the equator. The longer exposure time compensates for the diminished strength of the light, and these tropical plants will thrive under such conditions.


Source




posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 05:29 PM
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a reply to: DenyObfuscation

The second link states, "The second goal is for the satellite to do its job, which is to unfurl and use its large swath of reflectors to reflect rays from the sun back to Earth—which will make it the brightest object in the night sky".

The first link mentioned, "Russia has explored orbiting even bigger reflectors in the past. In 1993, a Progress cargo ship bound for the Mir space station carried aloft Znamya ("Banner"), a 65-foot diameter reflective disk of plastic coated with aluminum. While it was also intended to test the feasibility of solar sails, Znamya was an experiment in orbital lighting—using orbiting mirrors to light parts of the earth (or even entire cities) at night with reflected sunlight. The idea behind the program was that a collection of orbiting mirrors could be used to extend the length of daylight hours for harvests, major construction projects, and disaster response operations, a concept originally concocted by German space theorist Hermann Oberth (one of the fathers of modern rocketry) in the 1920s."

I agree the jump to conclusion of the Mayak satellite's aim to light cities is not cited in either article; However, there is strong inference that the Mayak could be used in a more limited fashion as its predecessor Znamya. Both articles suggest that the Mayak would be one of the brightest objects in the night sky.

Thank you for keeping me on point with my post, although it's not as if I swayed far from the satellite energy applications the University is attempting to test, or the braking system testing the articles claim are to come.

I do not believe we are getting the full research reasons the Mayak is to be set for launch and placement, but for now, the articles are clear as to scientific applications to be tested.

edit on 6-3-2016 by Boscov because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 05:50 PM
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a reply to: Boscov
I understand, but this part stands out to me, "The idea behind the program was that a collection of orbiting mirrors could be used to extend the length of daylight hours".

Those mirrors were also much larger than this thing and it doesn't indicate if it was actually successful.

About this one being one of the brightest objects in the sky, the ISS appears up to 4x brighter than Sirius, the brightest star, and I don't think anyone has to don shades for one of its (ISS) passes.



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 05:57 PM
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I think the reality is that this will provide very little light and really not be a big deal. I just can't see such a small reflector brightening up much on earth.

I suspect that this will fizzle out and not amount to much. As for bloody hopi prophecies...im sick of reading about those on ATS. If they were could see the future, why could they not forsee men coming to take away their land. I have no idea why grown ups a feel the need to believe in fairy tales.



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 05:57 PM
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a reply to: DenyObfuscation

Yep, I've noticed that a few times as well. It can easily be bright enough to read during a full moon on a clear night with a relatively reflective surface nearby.

But something large enough to cast a light as bright as the moon would probably be shredded by space junk before we could even get the rocket ready to blow it out of the sky.


-dex



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 06:18 PM
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a reply to: DexterRiley


A full moon makes it easier for prey to identify predator and again we would be messing with the food chain.



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 07:00 PM
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originally posted by: Kashai
a reply to: DexterRiley
A full moon makes it easier for prey to identify predator and again we would be messing with the food chain.
That's actually a pretty good point. Both I and my fellow nocturnals would certainly not appreciate having our habitat so illuminated on a constant basis.


Such destabilization would definitely obey the law of unintended consequences. I'm sure that a fully functional full-time full moon would impact more than a few characteristics of our environment.

The stated purpose for this satellite is to provide additional illumination during the harvest. But it seems to me that a more localized approach would be less environmentally intrusive. Such as tall scaffolding topped with night suns, powered by diesel generators. That's probably even more cost-effective than a billion dollar satellite.

-dex



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 07:26 PM
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a reply to: DexterRiley


And even so crops would be smaller.



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 08:52 PM
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a reply to: DexterRiley

"But something large enough to cast a light as bright as the moon would probably be shredded by space junk before we could even get the rocket ready to blow it out of the sky."

Actually we would probably still try to shoot it down.


I mean clearly deploying something like this would do more harm than help, if it was related to Earth.



posted on Mar, 8 2016 @ 05:39 AM
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Hopi Prophecies?

I am not familiar.



posted on Mar, 8 2016 @ 06:58 AM
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originally posted by: Eilasvaleleyn
Hopi Prophecies?

I am not familiar.


Don't bother. It's total rubbish.



posted on Mar, 8 2016 @ 07:16 AM
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The "Mayak" Satellite is a conspiracy project cover up. . . from an alien mothership aka huge pyramid ufo appearing in the sky.




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