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Sceintist find 140 Trillion Times the water than is on the Earth

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posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 02:41 AM
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originally posted by: orionthehunter
The new process efficiently converts salt water to fresh using some battery tech.

I'm curious to know what you're talking about. If you're referring to electro dialysis/capacitive deionization, then it's hardly a new technology. If not, though, and there is some new method, I'd be very interested to know about it.




posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 12:37 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

this is amazing



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 03:01 PM
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a reply to: Nochzwei

Yes it is.

It has got me to thinking about how we could use waste materials and create a process that utilizes the operation of a quasar on a smaller scale to power the unit continually and to produce water vapor then condense it into liquid.



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 07:59 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn
Wow that is amazing. Thank you for sharing.




posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 11:30 PM
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Phage, do you think we know enough about a Quasar to mimic it on a smaller scale?

I though if we did we could create a device that mimics the quasar, We could fuel it with trash to power itself and produce water vapour, then we could condense the vapour into liquid so as to supply the world with water.

I know I am just a Dreamer.

Would be nice though.

oh wait a minute a miniature black whole might not be all that stable. Oh well back to the drawing board


edit on 6-3-2016 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 11:32 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

I knew water was universal and abundant in the universe...

Cool. Very cool.

S&F



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 01:05 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: ChesterJohn
Meaningless question.
Space has no temperature.


No, your reply is nonsense. If anything, space does have a specific temperature, the thing is, it is the lower temperature that can be and it doesn't change over time. Explain to me, oh wise one, is the space hot or cold? does it get cold when you are out there? if so then there is a temperature you can measure, is just not a variable one. I may be mistaken a bit here but the temperature in space is something like -270 Celsius and that means it can be measured, you can't measure something that doesn't exist, can you?

Time and again i see your posts and you continue to look like a robot that has been filled with "current knowledge" that someone else figured out and you just keep repeating one liners over and over until this "accepted truth" changes then you start repeating the new "accepted truth".
edit on 7-3-2016 by WarriorMH because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 06:25 AM
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originally posted by: enlightenedservant

originally posted by: intergalactic fire
now back to earth, how to end water poverty.

The solution is an international network of desalination plants and water pipelines. There's more water on Earth than we can ever use or need. We just have to start treating it as a priority.


What do you suggest we do with the brine water left over from desalination? Salt the earth?



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 06:43 AM
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originally posted by: WarriorMH

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: ChesterJohn
Meaningless question.
Space has no temperature.


No, your reply is nonsense.

Phage's reply is not really nonsense, but the question of "what is the temperature of space" can sometimes be about semantics.

Space itself has no temperature. However, things IN space (such as a satellite, astronaut, or these water molecules) can have a temperature, but normal space has virtually no molecules of stuff, so there is nothing to be warm or cold. The reason why we can measure the air temperature on Earth is because we are measuring the temperature of molecules in the atmosphere.

If you put a thermometer in space, it would show the temperature of the thermometer itself, not the space surrounding it. If that thermometer were in the sun, it could be warmed by the Sun's radiation, but that temperature would only be at the thermometer itself. If the thermometer were in a shady spot (say in a spot in permanent shade where the Moon is eclipsing the Sun), then that thermometer would slowly radiate its heat into space and eventually show a cold temperature.

When we say "it's warm today" here on Earth, we are talking about the temperature of the molecules of air around us. Through conduction, that air can either transfer its heat to us, or (on a cold day) conduction can pull our heat away from us. That is different than what happens in space, where there is virtually no conductive process; things in space can get hot or things can lose heat (get cold) through radiation rather than conduction.

EDIT TO ADD:
Some astrophysicist will say that space DOES have a temperature, and that temperature is the cosmic microwave background (CMB), which is 2.726 K (2.726 degrees above absolute zero). But again, it's semantics, because this is the temperature that the CMB radiation can be measured to be when it (theoretically) heats up a thermometer.


edit on 3/7/2016 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 06:46 AM
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originally posted by: ChesterJohn
a reply to: Nochzwei

Yes it is.

It has got me to thinking about how we could use waste materials and create a process that utilizes the operation of a quasar on a smaller scale to power the unit continually and to produce water vapor then condense it into liquid.


You wouldn't need the energy from a quasar to combine hydrogen and oxygen to make water. Hydrogen combusts very easily, and can be done so with the heat energy from a match or even just a normal spark. When hydrogen combusts, water is created.



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 09:30 AM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

This is an idiotic statement just as there is more oil than we can ever want or need? I do believe with the over population of the human animal there is no such thing as an infinite supply of anything on this rock floating through the chasm of space.

Has anyone mentioned how far this "water" is or how to get it so close to a black hole? seems like an effort in futility in our current situation...



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 10:33 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

so it would be prohibitively expensive to break down all our trash to get the hydrogen and oxygen to make water from it.



posted on Mar, 8 2016 @ 12:33 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

I like your response, this is what i would expect instead of just a one liner putting someone down. I agree that it all comes down to how people decides to interpret the data, and even if the way things heat up or get colder in space is different than on Earth i still think that if you can meassure it somehow then it exists as that concept (of having a temperature)

Anyway you clearly know and understand from where i was coming from and thanks for expanding on it.

Stating something as an absolute fact is a big mistake and no scientist should ever do that, its a terrible habit. You can never know how new data or looking at things from a new perspective will change things. Otherwise we would still be denying planes can flight and can go beyond the speed or sound.



posted on Mar, 8 2016 @ 01:21 AM
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a reply to: WarriorMH

I like your response, this is what i would expect instead of just a one liner putting someone down.
If a fact takes more than one line, why post more?
How is it a put down?


if you can meassure it somehow then it exists as that concept (of having a temperature)
But, you missed the point. You can't measure the temperature of space. Yes, you can measure radiation levels. But that is not temperature. You can measure the temperature of things in space. You can measure the temperature of water vapor in space. But space has no temperature.
edit on 3/8/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2016 @ 04:06 AM
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originally posted by: Forensick

originally posted by: enlightenedservant

originally posted by: intergalactic fire
now back to earth, how to end water poverty.

The solution is an international network of desalination plants and water pipelines. There's more water on Earth than we can ever use or need. We just have to start treating it as a priority.


What do you suggest we do with the brine water left over from desalination? Salt the earth?


French Fries and lots of em.




posted on Mar, 8 2016 @ 02:57 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: WarriorMH

I like your response, this is what i would expect instead of just a one liner putting someone down.
If a fact takes more than one line, why post more?
How is it a put down?


if you can meassure it somehow then it exists as that concept (of having a temperature)
But, you missed the point. You can't measure the temperature of space. Yes, you can measure radiation levels. But that is not temperature. You can measure the temperature of things in space. You can measure the temperature of water vapor in space. But space has no temperature.


It matters because you are wrong and don't even provide a simple explanation of why you think you're right. Don't be so narrow that just because you learned it as a "fact" nothing can ever change or you can learn that whatever you learned was a simplified explanation. That's the danger with the facts you like to throw around, they may not show the full picture.

What is space made out of? are referring to a 'void' perhaps? what do you think about this? are they wrong?

helios.gsfc.nasa.gov...



Temperature of the Universe

What is the approximate temperature of the Universe, and how can it be calculated?
The entire Universe is filled with the remnants of the Big Bang, in the form of photons (electromagnetic packets). They have cooled down to about 2.7 Kelvin or 2.7 degrees above absolute zero (-270.7 degrees Centigrade). So this is the temperature of space. It can be calculated from the expansion of the Universe, and it has been measured.

You can learn more about the COBE mission that measured this on the TopHat web site.

Drs. Eric Christian and Louis Barbier

Temperature of the "Void"

Is it correct that objects in deep space (not heated by an external source, such as the Sun) have a temperature near absolute zero - but the void itself has NO temperature?
Objects in the void will eventually come to the equilibrium temperature of the cosmic microwave background, which is 2.7 Kelvin (2.7 degrees above absolute zero). The cosmic background is a sea of photons (light) that are the remnants of the Big Bang, which has cooled down to 2.7 Kelvin over 15-20 billion years. The comment that the void itself has no temperature comes from the fact that temperature is usually defined with the random motions of matter, and if there is no matter, there is no temperature. But I (and many others) equate the cosmic background with the 'void' having an effective temperature of 2.7 Kelvin, even if there is no matter.

Dr. Eric Christian


I'm sorry but i just don't think you are well informed or can imagine beyond what you have learned already. As explained on that link, yes there's no matter on space so it can't have a temperature (as matter do), BUT there are remnants of the big bang in the form of cosmic microwave background which fill that void and it can have a temperature that can be measured.

So again, if it can be measured, then it exists. I don't know why its so hard for you to visualize and understand this, perhaps you think the NASA link is also wrong so never mind then.
edit on 8-3-2016 by WarriorMH because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2016 @ 07:51 PM
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a reply to: WarriorMH

I just wonder if there is no temperature in Space why is it water boils then the vapour turns to ice.

Is that just a local space phenomena only found in our solar system?



posted on Mar, 9 2016 @ 02:08 PM
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originally posted by: ChesterJohn
But when I read this article I was blown away. then I remember the Bible mentions God at some time after the beginning of his way there were fountains of water.

Prov 8:22-24 ¶ The LORD possessed me in the beginning of his way, before his works of old. I was set up from everlasting, from the beginning, or ever the earth was. When there were no depths, I was brought forth; when there were no fountains abounding with water.
I would not doubt one bit if this is one of those fountains of water.


Yeah... no doubt... right.

Flag for the science. Lack of a star for the ridiculous conclusion...

Now we just need to prove it isn't any of the water-specific gods found in the following religions and cultures!

1 Aztec mythology
2 Ainu mythology
3 Australian aboriginal mythology
4 Benin mythology
5 Canaanite mythology
6 Celtic mythology
7 Chinese mythology
8 Dogon mythology
9 Egyptian mythology
10 Fon/Ewe mythology
11 Fijian mythology
12 Finnish mythology
13 Greek mythology
14 Hawaiian mythology
15 Hittite mythology
16 Hebrew mythology
17 Hindu/Vedic mythology
18 Igbo mythology
19 Incan mythology
20 Inuit mythology
21 Japanese mythology
22 Korean mythology
23 Kyrgyz mythology
24 Lithuanian mythology
25 Luganda mythology
26 Lusitanian mythology
27 Māori mythology
28 Mayan mythology
29 Mesopotamian mythology
30 Native American mythology
31 Norse/Germanic mythology
32 Persian/Zoroastrian mythology
33 Philippine mythology
34 Physiologus
35 Pirate lore
36 Roman mythology
37 Shilluk mythology
38 Slavic mythology
39 Island Nations mythology
40 Taíno mythology
41 The Tonga of Zimbabwe
42 Yoruba mythology
43 Vietnamese mythology
44 Viking lore



posted on Mar, 9 2016 @ 02:12 PM
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originally posted by: ChesterJohn
a reply to: WarriorMH

I just wonder if there is no temperature in Space why is it water boils then the vapour turns to ice.

Is that just a local space phenomena only found in our solar system?


There are many things that emit heat. Heat travels through a vacuum by infrared radiation (light with a longer wavelength than the human eye can see). The Sun (and anything warm) is constantly emitting infrared, and the Earth absorbs it and turns the energy into atomic and molecular motion, or heat.



posted on Mar, 9 2016 @ 02:19 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

Excellent find

Maybe during some of the black hole processes of separating the atoms into particles the elements or materials are separated initially and then recompiled. Such activities could then pull hydrogen and oxygen from various existing celestial materials and make the mentioned fluid / water detected...

NAMASTE*******



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