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A thought on the Sun

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posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 04:42 AM
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a reply to: ExCloud

So are you asking what would happen if, inside the Sun, there was like an explosion or something? The Sun is basically one long explosion, or millions of explosions all in one place.

The Sun discharges a lot of energy, sometimes we get ejections of mass called coronal mass ejections and we can see them, they look like huge splashes of fire that fly away from the Sun out into space.

They are magnetically charged and cause the aurorae on Earth, and also some electromagnetic problems with satellites when they hit hard.


edit on 5-3-2016 by Jonjonj because: format




posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 04:46 AM
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a reply to: ExCloud

It is not the magnetism of the sun that keeps our planet in its orbital alignment, but the GRAVITY of the sun. They are entirely separate from one another. Its magnetic properties however, are what contain, and sometimes unleash the vast solar flares, coronal mass ejections, and so on, that could potentially cause communications blackouts and grid failures on this planet, if said flares happen to pass through the region of space that our planet inhabits at any given moment.



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 04:50 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Nice reply.



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 04:53 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Yea thats where I am at. I got that. Okay so you have this orbit, but We are magnetic as is the sun. Say you put 2 magnets together what happens depending on what side you push them? We are getting pushed farther away from our sun, but for an instant(Yes always explosions and burning but a mass explosion). What happens? A Mass explosion on one side of the sun aka a coronal hole could push or pull the earth in? Correct? Like for a 3 second instance?



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 04:56 AM
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a reply to: ExCloud

We have been at our current orbit for around 4.5 billion years. You really don't have to worry about it.



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 04:59 AM
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a reply to: JackReyes

I get that
Im saying.... do we notice 3second scew up or a 20 second screw up? If we are watching the sun/earth orbit or whatever do we notice it?



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 05:00 AM
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originally posted by: ExCloud
a reply to: JackReyes

I get that
Im saying.... do we notice 3second scew up or a 20 second screw up? If we are watching the sun/earth orbit or whatever do we notice it?


There is no screw up.



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 05:02 AM
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a reply to: ExCloud

It is kind of hard to know what you mean by 3 second screw up. To put it into perspective, the Sun is a pretty fluid object, it moves like a fluid, things don't just start and then stop in 3 seconds, maybe that is what you are thinking?

Pictures can often tell stories that words fail to describe, so check out this video to see the fluid nature of the Sun:



Incredibly beautiful and pretty intense.


edit on 5-3-2016 by Jonjonj because: added video



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 05:09 AM
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a reply to: Jonjonj

A 3 second screw up in light years is nothing , but you screw up in 3seconds in you life what the impact? Im getting at that. Like the sun screws up for 3s we may not notice it on a huge scale, but it does effect us I think. 3 seconds=3years=30years=300years in a personal life. Im sure it means the same thing in astrophysical sense, but I think its effects something. We have been here billions of years...



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 05:10 AM
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a reply to: ExCloud

Listen I will share with you some more amazing things about our sun.


In order for life to exist you need a single star. Most stars in the observable universe (which is the Milky Way) are binary. Almost all of them. Check an astronomer if you doubt that. And almost no yellow stars (like our sun) have found to be single, rather they are all binary. Ours is a single star. This is important because a binary star system can wreck havoc on the gravity of the solar systems planets.

The circular orbit of our planets. most exo-planets found to exist have ecliptical, and not circular orbits, unlike our solar system.

The fact that small planets are found in the inner-solar system, and large planets in the outer. The outer planets act like magnets and actual shields for the inner planets, as their gravity draws in comets and other outside matter that hurls inward. Also if you had large planets in the inner solar system their gravity would play havoc on our orbit around the sun.

Those are a few things, just a few.

Scientists are looking for life elsewhere in the universe. They should at least take these very very few factors into account when looking, and then, even then, they would find very very few candidates, if none.

Our sun revolving around the galaxy is found at and outward arm. Closer to the inner for of the galaxy life would be impossible because of the stellar radiation of the mass stars clumped together, as well as the inner giant black hole.

The earth is special.

When the first mission was launched to the moon, do you realize the astronauts were not focused on the moon as they went there? They kept looking out the window towards the earth, in unbelievable awe at the beauty of earth. They could not stop looking at it. The earth's beauty far dwarfs that of the moon.

And that is our home.

And we are safe on it. God will NOT allow anything to destroy it EVER.

Again, take comfort in a few more words of truth:

(Psalm 104:5) He has established the earth on its foundations; It will not be moved from its place forever and ever.

(Ecclesiastes 1:4) A generation is going, and a generation is coming, But the earth remains forever.



edit on 5-3-2016 by JackReyes because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 05:17 AM
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a reply to: ExCloud

Well here is where we must refer to our magnetosphere, and the difference in potency between magnetism, and gravity.

Our planet has magnetic properties, it is true. Around our planet is a bubble of magnetic force that we call the magnetosphere, a shield of sorts against particle emissions both from deep space, and from our own home star, harmful emissions, which would scour the planet dry and dead in hours, were it not for the protection offered by that magnetospheric barrier. When the solar wind blows against our magnetosphere, it changes the shape of the magnetosphere, like a crumple zone on a car might change upon impact with an object. Except when the solar wind changes to a lower ebb, our magnetosphere changes back to its original shape. It is adaptive shielding, and although it is common for some excess radiation to pass through during the Suns most active periods, it is generally a formidable defence.

However, as formidable as the magnetic field of our planet is, at performing the role of defending our planet from the Suns fury, it is not strong enough to magnetically attract our planet toward the Sun, and fantastically enough, neither is the Suns magnetic field strong enough to either push, or pull our planet in any given direction what so ever.

Now, if there were a serious event on the Sun, and I mean so serious as to fail to resemble any recorded event in the history of solar observation, or indeed in human history to date, which did cause an effect in terms of our orbit, no matter how major, or slight, it would have precisely nothing to do with magnetism, or at least, the actual mechanical effect which caused the change, would not have anything to do with magnetism.

Let's say that a huge, and I mean solar system shattering CME blasted free from the sun, a CME of such magnitude, that it caused the mass of the sun to change drastically, over the course of very few seconds. Since the amount of mass something has, directly effects the amount of gravity it exerts on surrounding things, like space time for example, you might see a ripple in the skin of space time, which might slightly alter the organisation of objects in the solar system, but it would be the GRAVITY of the Sun which had changed, which had affected the rest of the system, not in any way, it's magnetic fields.
edit on 5-3-2016 by TrueBrit because: Spelling error correction



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 05:21 AM
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originally posted by: JackReyes
And we are safe on it. God will NOT allow anything to destroy it EVER.



It's already been destroyed several times. Pretty much everything tossed and a new restart. It'll happen again, given enough time.



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 05:24 AM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: JackReyes
And we are safe on it. God will NOT allow anything to destroy it EVER.



It's already been destroyed several times. Pretty much everything tossed and a new restart. It'll happen again, given enough time.


All before human life. And if you take human life into account, you can even call the global flood, or deluge, the end of a world.

But when has the earth ever been destroyed? NEVER. And we have the promise that it never will be.

No meteor, while humans live on earth, will ever hit earth to kill us. No one will ever die of a meteor strike. Because, while Satan may rule the earth the angels protect it from outside. All of the damage being done is by humans, and Satan of course. All of it.



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 05:29 AM
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originally posted by: JackReyes
But when has the earth ever been destroyed? NEVER. And we have the promise that it never will be.


I'd call the advent of chloroplasts one such destruction. Every advanced form of life on Earth died, a victim of green pond scum. And that was it for life on Earth.

There was a very great spread of life in the pre-Cambrian. All sorts of things you never saw again, and it was obliterated by a meteor strike. Back to the drawing board.

The surface of Earth was re-liquified when the Moon was created. There's you one.

And the Age of Reptiles ended when the comet hit.

It's not the only one. If you look at a globe, there are a LOT of circular bays. The Gulf of Mexico, for instance. It's likely an asteroid strike.

We'll eat another asteroid or comet eventually. It's a matter of time.



No meteor, while humans live on earth, will ever hit earth to kill us. No one will ever die of a meteor strike.


Yah, right.



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 05:31 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

The earth still lives. Does it not? We are on it. How many earths do you think there were?

When has there ever been a recorded event of ONE single human killed by a meteor? EVER? You say "yea right" like you have a lot of evidence to the contrary. Bring it forth.



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 05:38 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam




It's not the only one. If you look at a globe, there are a LOT of circular bays. The Gulf of Mexico, for instance. It's likely an asteroid strike.


I thought that it had already been stated that the probable asteroid strike at Chicxulub, in the Gulf of Mexico, was what caused the ELE at the time of the dinosaurs.

They are going to drill there, you know?

Chicxulub drilling mission

Science mag Chicxulub drilling




posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 05:39 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam





Of course. The Solar magnetic field flips polarity back and forth quite frequently.


Oh! That must account for my dizzy spells then



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 05:40 AM
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a reply to: JackReyes

The last time I checked, this thread was not posted in the religion forums. The information you are putting forth here, does not represent a scientific opinion in the least, and I am wondering why it is that you think it appropriate fare for this conversation.

I believe in Christ, in God, and the Bible, and yet you do not see me muddying up a scientific discussion with matters of faith.



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 05:43 AM
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originally posted by: JackReyes
a reply to: Bedlam

The earth still lives. Does it not? We are on it. How many earths do you think there were?


The earth is a rock. A complicated rock, but it's not alive.

I'd say the eradication of all life except pond scum is pretty much obliteration.

Same with the pre-Cambrian explosion. You get a 99.9% de-speciation, you got an effective End of the World As We Know It.




When has there ever been a recorded event of ONE single human killed by a meteor? EVER? You say "yea right" like you have a lot of evidence to the contrary. Bring it forth.



Life on Earth has been decimated by asteroids and comets more than once. Your view of history is narrow. Let me guess...you think the Earth's about 6000 years old, too, right?

But there were two recorded Tunguska deaths, no one knows how many more there were, given the terrain. And 1500 injuries due to the Chelyabinsk meteor. A 40 year old Indian guy bit it in February of this year, dozens of Chinese were killed by one in 1639.



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 05:44 AM
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originally posted by: Jonjonj

I thought that it had already been stated that the probable asteroid strike at Chicxulub, in the Gulf of Mexico, was what caused the ELE at the time of the dinosaurs.


Yup. As Larry Niven says, look at a globe with an eye for circular features. They're all over, once you start looking. Every one likely to be an impact.



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