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March 5th Asteroids, 2016 EG1 and 2016 DN2

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posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 02:23 PM
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I understand it is already march 5th in some parts of the world, but I find no evidence these have passed yet.

2016 EG1 at 1.1 LD and 2016 DN2 at 1.8 LD

2016 DN2

2016 EG1


Several have been posted about recently, but I didn't see these in any posts or 2 in one day.




posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: reldra

Well, the times are listed at the bottom of the link, I would suppose that the times are UDT?



posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 02:31 PM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: reldra

Well, the times are listed at the bottom of the link, I would suppose that the times are UDT?


That says date of determination. Does that mean time and date of pass?



posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 02:35 PM
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originally posted by: reldra

originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: reldra

Well, the times are listed at the bottom of the link, I would suppose that the times are UDT?


That says date of determination. Does that mean time and date of pass?

What I was reading was called 'Close-Approach Data'.
Check your messages...
edit on b000000312016-03-04T14:35:53-06:0002America/ChicagoFri, 04 Mar 2016 14:35:53 -0600200000016 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 02:36 PM
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Should I wear my motorcycle helmet?



posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 02:37 PM
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originally posted by: butcherguy

originally posted by: reldra

originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: reldra

Well, the times are listed at the bottom of the link, I would suppose that the times are UDT?


That says date of determination. Does that mean time and date of pass?

What I was reading was called 'Close-Approach Data'.
Check your messages...


I am too. I click on 'solution date' and it leads to a description of that which says 'date of determination'.



posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 02:42 PM
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originally posted by: reldra

originally posted by: butcherguy

originally posted by: reldra

originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: reldra

Well, the times are listed at the bottom of the link, I would suppose that the times are UDT?


That says date of determination. Does that mean time and date of pass?

What I was reading was called 'Close-Approach Data'.
Check your messages...
I am too. I click on 'solution date' and it leads to a description of that which says 'date of determination'.

I believe the solution date is the date and time that they ran the latest solution for the orbit? I don't know for sure, not into orbital mechanics.


edit on b000000312016-03-04T14:48:21-06:0002America/ChicagoFri, 04 Mar 2016 14:48:21 -0600200000016 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 02:42 PM
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a reply to: reldra

I think that for DN2 the times of approach are 2016-Mar-05 13:48 as it passes Earth and 2016-Mar-06 00:47 as it passes the moon. At least i think so.
Same for the other one, close approach data, bottom left.



posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 02:45 PM
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originally posted by: Jonjonj
a reply to: reldra

I think that for DN2 the times of approach are 2016-Mar-05 13:48 as it passes Earth and 2016-Mar-06 00:47 as it passes the moon. At least i think so.
Same for the other one, close approach data, bottom left.


ty



posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 02:46 PM
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At least I won't have to die while I'm at work...

Maybe I'll sleep in tomorrow.




posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 02:54 PM
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a reply to: reldra

No problem, it only rang a bell because someone told me a couple of weeks ago. I hope they were right!




posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 03:23 PM
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I know nothing about it, but it says that those dates are TDB, and, according to Wikipedia, that means Barycentric Dynamical Time.

Anyone knows how that relates to something like UTC?



posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 03:56 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP
I know nothing about it, but it says that those dates are TDB, and, according to Wikipedia, that means Barycentric Dynamical Time.

Anyone knows how that relates to something like UTC?


ArMaP, you must lower your expectation that normal people can actually understand what you say. I will look up barycentric Dynamical time.



edit: I think I know what this means. The site I used in my original post notes this somewhere. It is terrestrial time vs TDB and, alao, I think, time added or subtracted due to orbits. I think the difference is in milliseconds.
edit on 4-3-2016 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 06:26 PM
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a reply to: reldra

Thanks.



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 02:57 AM
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Lots of new objects discovered in the last 7-10 days.

It's been very interesting.



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 03:52 AM
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I think what we are in a period that they call: "two days of uncertainty".
I remember reading that somewhere.



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 04:26 AM
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originally posted by: reldra
I understand it is already march 5th in some parts of the world, but I find no evidence these have passed yet.

There would hardly be any evidence, as those asteroids looked very small and faint even at the close approach.

2016 DN2 had the apparent magnitude of around 17, which is a lot fainter than Pluto. 2016 EG1 was even fainter, at apparent magnitude of 18.5 (the larger the number, the fainter the object). I got these values from the "Ephemeris" link on those JPL pages. It also gives the times in UT.

Some very dedicated astronomer, somewhere, might have the photos or the video footage of those asteroids during the close approach, but we can only hope.
edit on 5-3-2016 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 04:37 AM
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originally posted by: M4nWithNoN4me
Lots of new objects discovered in the last 7-10 days.

It's been very interesting.

Check the tallies on the right: minorplanetcenter.net... and prepare to be amazed.



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 08:08 AM
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a reply to: wildespace
Thanks for that link. I've been looking up at the sky lately thanks to all the chatter here on ats. I can't believe how many close approach's are on that list and it only shows march. As a noob to this subject trying to learn more is this normal? Do we usually have so many close/ish approach's? I believe somebody wrote on another tread we are moving through a part of space with more activity, would that be the most likely explanation?



posted on Mar, 5 2016 @ 12:32 PM
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originally posted by: 772STi
a reply to: wildespace
Thanks for that link. I've been looking up at the sky lately thanks to all the chatter here on ats. I can't believe how many close approach's are on that list and it only shows march. As a noob to this subject trying to learn more is this normal? Do we usually have so many close/ish approach's? I believe somebody wrote on another tread we are moving through a part of space with more activity, would that be the most likely explanation?


That list includes approaches as far away as 40 LD (LD is the average distance from Earth to the Moon), which is hardly what people imagine when you say "close approach".

No, I'm not aware of any evidence that the number of close approaches or impacts is increasing, or that we're moving through a more active part of space. The asteroids are part of the Solar System as they orbit the Sun, so really they have nothing to do with the part of interstellar space we're moving through.




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