It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

A Comparative Religion inquiry into Modern Art

page: 1
2

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 3 2016 @ 03:24 PM
link   
The founder of Abstract art Kazimir Malevich put his now famous Black Square in the Icon Corner of the exhibition hall


where Orthodox Christians always put an icon



In his correspondence with an art critic Malevich called his painting "the image of God."

When Malevich died his followers placed Black Squre at the head of his funeral bed



Orthodox Christians usually have an icon in that place.



These and many other fact suggest that the worshiping of modern art is a religion.

See:
Holy Black Square: A Comparative Religion inquiry into Modern Art




posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 03:17 AM
link   
a reply to: vernichter

This proves you have no clue what art is...



posted on Mar, 4 2016 @ 12:43 PM
link   

originally posted by: Peeple
a reply to: vernichter

This proves you have no clue what art is...

We certainly have some advance in understanding.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 08:48 AM
link   
a reply to: vernichter
As usual another interesting thread that's way over my head, so kudos.

Love the Futurists, I think they we're included in the Dadaist Manifesto, although Tristan Tzara took a shot at them.

Here's my two cents, I like the Holy Black Square, if we look at the Buddhist tradition, Nirvana is the goal- deliverance of the mind. That is the final goal and cessation of all sufferings and conflicts- supreme happiness. From what I heard from the Eastern Orthodoxy tradition, via negativa- a way of describing something by saying what it is not, especially denying that any finite concept of attribute can be identified with or used of God or ultimate reality.

So if we interpret the Holy Black Square as representation of nothingness, that sure is a profound subject, one can even say iconic.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 08:52 AM
link   
a reply to: MaxTamesSiva

I am a fan of futurism. The "art" the OP describes is by no mean "Futurism", it's more like Suprematism, which I thoroughly dislike.

Futurism is about the inclusion of science/technological references or dynamism inside the artwork.

Suprematism is Russian in origin and is about geometrical figures, such as squares - just like the artwork in the OP.



edit on 2-5-2016 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 10:30 AM
link   
a reply to: swanne
Thank you for pointing that out, I always thought that Kazimir Malevich was a Futurist. I'm a fan of Boccioni's sculptures... I guess I love the Suprematists too. Maybe Mondrian, Kandinsky and Rothko owe something to the Suprematists?

Got it, Malevich was follower of Futurism before he founded Suprematism.

In Russia, Futurism had a strong effect on Rayonism and Constructivism. The movement began in 1912 with the publication of its manifesto A Slap in the Face For Public Taste. Members included Vladimir and David Burlyuk (1882-1967), Vladimir Mayakovsky (1893-1930), Mikhail Larionov (1881-1964), Natalia Goncharova (1881-1962), Kazimir Malevich (1878-1935) the founder of Suprematism, Velimir Khlebnikov and Alexei Kruchenykh (1886-1968). The movement endured longer in Russia, becoming closely associated with revolutionary politics, and influenced several other Russian art movements.

visual-arts-cork.com
edit on 09 11 2015 by MaxTamesSiva because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2016 @ 05:28 PM
link   
a reply to: MaxTamesSiva

Actually if you read the article linked in the OP you see that the exhibition where Malevich put his Black Suprematic Square in the Icon Corner was titled The Last Futurist Exhibition of Paintings 0.10




top topics



 
2

log in

join