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Plethora of Links on Global Warming

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posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 02:59 AM
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originally posted by: intergalactic fire
a reply to: Phage

Matter of fact the earth was in a glaciation cycle during the Ordovician period.


Well accurate information skewed based on biased point of view.

There are theories that the only reason that life on earth exists is because greenhouse gases trapped heat, warmed up the surface of the earth enough to put it in a habitable temperature. In fact Micho Kaku talks about using this effect to terraform mars


It wasn`t until the Ordovician period that plants started to appear on land and start to give a leveling of the co2, which is why there were so many different ice ages in the Precambian period. Even though co2 was high during that period there were lots of different things that caused weather to be sporadic. The introduction of of plant life started an equalization of the atmosphere that started stabilizing the temperature and environment.

Also as for the solar output the sun`s thermal radiation output was about 30% less than it is today.
www.climate.be...




posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 05:48 AM
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a reply to: openeyeswideshut



Well accurate information skewed based on biased point of view.

You say now we can't rely on any of the historical data?





Also as for the solar output the sun`s thermal radiation output was about 30% less than it is today.
www.climate.be...




The evidence for the climate of the early Earth is particularly scarce. When Earth was formed about 4.6 billion years ago, the solar irradiance was about 30% lower than at present.


I wasn't talking about the solar energy during the earth's formation. Only if you believe earth is 500My old.



which is why there were so many different ice ages in the Precambian period

You know you are talking on a timespan for over 4 billion years? I like to see the data saying there were so many different ice ages during the precambrian.



It wasn`t until the Ordovician period that plants started to appear on land and start to give a leveling of the co2. Even though co2 was high during that period. The introduction of of plant life started an equalization of the atmosphere that started stabilizing the temperature and environment.

No, there wasn't any 'leveling off' of co2, especially not during the paleozoic. The only period you could say was fairly stable was during the mesozoic. Life was already in full abundance during that period.



there were lots of different things that caused weather to be sporadic.

Such as?
edit on 6-3-2016 by intergalactic fire because: (no reason given)

edit on 6-3-2016 by intergalactic fire because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 01:27 PM
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originally posted by: intergalactic fire
a reply to: Phage




Because CO2 absorbs and re-emits infrared radiation. Because the more CO2 there is, the less heat escapes to space. Because humans are dumping billions of tons of CO2 into the atmosphere each year. Because CO2 levels are higher than they have been for at least 700,000 years. Because that has happened over the past 100 years.


to be more correct somewhere near 6 GT a year, yes. Compare that to 2000 GT from biomass from organic life or +35000 GT from the oceans. Where is the significance in that?

+-50ppm higher than the norm, yes, is that a big deal? Who knows, that's at least what the ice core data tells us but if we look at the data derived from plant stomata we get a whole different picture.
Yet there is still a lot of discussion whether this data is accurate but that also counts for the ice cores, the determination of the age of the gas in the bubbles, the time when the pores close to the time the snow was deposited, loss or displacement of molecules during it's entrapment,...but as i said that also counts for the measurements of the stomata in plants.

CO2 increase has gone up since 1860, that's roughly 250 years after the temperature-rise at the last little ice age.
Leveled off, where, between 1750 and 1900? You could call that leveled off i guess.

If co2 is at it's highest value for over 700.000 years, why do we see a small decline in temperature since the last ice age?
And what about the lag? What does that say to you? It clearly shows temperature isn't carbon driven.




I'm not being taxed, but when do you think the time would be right to do something? Last minute?

We aren't doing anything, that's the problem! Last minute of what exactly? Before we get devoured by the oceans?or before we suffocate from pollution?

We know too little to say we know how our climate works.
Maybe we should learn more from the past and trying to figure out why ice ages happen or what causes these abrupt changes in earths past climate.


I have read the LIA was caused by volcanic eruption along the Icelandic fault. It was enough to cool Europe in the 18th century. This was preceded by "Medieval Warm Period" which was well before industrialization.

We still haven't gained the understanding of the complexities of the environment. It would be extremely arrogant to predict catastrophic events with the level of science today. We can't control the weather and are only marginally capable of predicting it. Has there been a plan to reduce the CO2 in the atmosphere other through draconian efforts by the US alone?

The USA has started closing fossil fuel power plants and killing the coal industry In turn the present government hopes this will improve pollution. They haven't a scintilla of proof that anything will change. It's like spitting in the ocean. The only thing that will improve is the number of coal miners on public assistance. It would seem that the only thing we are sure of is more Americans will be hungry and cold because of these policies.



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 01:43 PM
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originally posted by: intergalactic fire
to be more correct somewhere near 6 GT a year, yes. Compare that to 2000 GT from biomass from organic life or +35000 GT from the oceans. Where is the significance in that?

Humans produce way, way more than 6 GT/yr. Estimated over 30 GT/yr.

The problem is that there was a slight sink effect prior to the industrial revolution, where CO2 was being absorbed more than it was being produced. Some of our CO2 is being absorbed back, too... but not all of it. You can actually calculate how much CO2 got added between time periods pretty easily:

originally posted by: Greven
Earth's atmosphere: 5,148,000 gigatonnes (Gt) = a
Mean molar mass of the atmosphere: 28.97g/mole = b
Carbon Dioxide (CO2) molar mass: 44.0095 g/mole = c
Atmospheric CO2 parts per million (ppm), November 2014: 397.27 ppm = d
Atmospheric CO2 ppm, November 2015: 400.16 ppm = e
Atmospheric CO2 mass, November 2014 (a * (c / b) * d): 3,106.7812 Gt = f
Atmospheric CO2 mass, November 2015 (a * (c / b) * e): 3,129.4654 Gt = g
Atmospheric CO2 mass increase (g - f): 22.6842 Gt



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 02:58 PM
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originally posted by: Greven
Humans produce way, way more than 6 GT/yr. Estimated over 30 GT/yr. / b) * e): 3,129.4654 Gt = g

The 6.4 gigatonnes I think is taken from the IPCC 2007 AR4 carbon-cycle and was the amount of CO2 as carbon emitted by humans every year. Converting that to CO2 amounts to about 23.5 gigatonnes. As of 2013 it was about 36 gigatonnes, and today I suspect it is probably at almost 40.
edit on 6-3-2016 by Nathan-D because: (no reason given)



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