It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Aviation trivia quiz.

page: 18
11
<< 15  16  17    19  20  21 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 08:07 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

And only 30 years really separated the 247 from the 747, just as two years separated the Wright Flyer from the 247.

It never gets less crazy to think about.




posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 08:08 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Do it! Doooooooo it!!!



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 08:24 PM
link   
a reply to: seagull

Even cheating, that one will be hard to find.



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 08:25 PM
link   
a reply to: Barnalby

Would be fun just to see what people's responses are.



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 08:42 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

God....I don't remember what or when but there was a test that crashed into an alfalfa field...I think...



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 08:49 PM
link   
a reply to: Sammamishman

Oh, it would be



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 09:11 PM
link   
The "alfalfa" could be flechettes dropped as an anti personnel weapon or to make a place hard to walk or drive through.

The object would be to drop a shaft of metal into the ground about every square foot or square yard. It would kill anybody there when they hit and would make movement through the area difficult if the shafts were sticking up out of the ground.

A rear area supply and logistics attack.



posted on Mar, 20 2016 @ 09:39 PM
link   
a reply to: Northernhollow

DAST. As soon as the drone left the wing the recovery chute deployed and it landed in an alfalfa field.



posted on Mar, 21 2016 @ 02:28 AM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Barnalby

First low wing monoplane, first all metal aircraft, last open cockpit aircraft.


That's not correct Zaphod. Junkers were building all metal low wing cantilever monoplanes (more advanced that the wire braced P-26) as early as worl war one, and they went into service. There were several other low wing monoplanes in the decade plus before the P-26 was built from several countries. The first low wing cantilever monoplane fighter built for US service was the British designed and built Handley Page HP21 Type S built for the US Navy in 1921.



Although this design was at least a decade ahead of its time, it was not adopted. It was offered to the USN as Handley Page already had a relationship with them from other aircraft and the British Air Ministry had made it clear they would never order a monoplane.
edit on 21-3-2016 by waynos because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2016 @ 02:45 AM
link   
Unanswered questions.

Atlantic, HP97 and VC7 were the commercial passenger carrying versions of the three V Bombers, Vulcan Valiant and Victor.

The Bloch 150 prototype completely refused to leave the ground, understandable in 1906, unforgivable in 1936, the much modified Bloch 152 fought in WW2.

Harmonious Dragmaster was the very loud Gloster Javelin 1952-68 which produced a strange whine from the vortex generators that festooned the delta wing.

Groundgripper was the less than encouraging nickname of the HS Trident jetliner 1962-85 from its incredibly long take off run.

Tonka is the RAF nickname for the Panavia Tornado, because of its general toughness (after 70's Tonka toys "for real tough boys"


edit on 21-3-2016 by waynos because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2016 @ 02:55 AM
link   

originally posted by: Barnalby
a reply to: Zaphod58

And only 30 years really separated the 247 from the 747, just as two years separated the Wright Flyer from the 247.

It never gets less crazy to think about.


The that gets us around here is that when the Vulcan started flying, the same companies Lancaster was still in service with the RAF!!. It's probably our modern perspective from decades long development programmes, but to look at them this seems incredible.

Similarly the RAF's last Spitfire sortie was in 1954 and the 1500mph BAC Lightning flew four years after in 1958.



posted on Mar, 21 2016 @ 04:39 AM
link   
a reply to: waynos

I should have said first designed and built in the US. I just figured since I was talking about Boeing that was assumed.
edit on 3/21/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2016 @ 05:15 AM
link   
Here's an interesting one. What is interesting about the A380 flap system.



posted on Mar, 21 2016 @ 05:23 AM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Never assume. First US doesn't equal first ever, that's the trouble with you Americans, lol.

Is the A380 flap all electric with no mechanical backup (guess)?



posted on Mar, 21 2016 @ 05:25 AM
link   
a reply to: waynos

Nope.



posted on Mar, 21 2016 @ 05:25 AM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
Here's an interesting one. What is interesting about the A380 flap system.


It's big and annoyingly loud?



posted on Mar, 21 2016 @ 05:32 AM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam

That too, but no.



posted on Mar, 21 2016 @ 05:43 AM
link   
Hm. It's got Kreugers and a droop. Although that's not that unusual.

eta: the droop is sealed?

etaa: Ha, I misremembered. It's got a droop instead of Kreuger flaps
edit on 21-3-2016 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2016 @ 07:22 AM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam

The left inboard fairing, ahead of the hinge, is bigger than the right inboard. They put the RAT in it.



posted on Mar, 21 2016 @ 08:06 AM
link   
a reply to: Semicollegiate

Don't know. This was for use against subs. I never wanted to find out, there was little chance of the helo being able to get out of the blast radius.



new topics

top topics



 
11
<< 15  16  17    19  20  21 >>

log in

join